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Maryland ■ 




I 




158 ■ 




.377 




1943/44 ■ 


• 




SEVENTY-EIGHTK 




ANNUAL REPORT 


V i . . , I 


iOARD OF EDUCATiOM 




OF MARYLAND 

1944 



LIBRARY -COLLEGE PARK 




DC SOT CIRCOLaTE 



. Digitized 


by the Internet Arch 






i 


in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/report00nnary_72 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 
State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
OF THE 

Public Schools of Maryland 
FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1944 




BALTIMORE, MD. 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

l^^f^ STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION--OCTOBER, 1944 

Name Addreea Name Addre$$ 

TASKER G. LOWNDES. Pres Cumberland NICHOLAS OREM HyattsvUle 

WENDELL D. ALLEN, Vice-Pres. Baltimore MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

HARRY Y. GEORGE Brunswick HENRY C. WHITEFORD Whiteford 

HORACE M. MORGAN Queen Anne 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1111 Lexington Buildinsr, Baltimore - 1, Md. 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. State Superintendent of Schools 

JOHN J. SEIDEL Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational Education 

E. CLARKE FONTAINE (Chestertown) Supervisor of High Schools 

JAMES E. SPITZNAS (Cumberland) Supervisor of High Schools 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Supervisor of High Schools 

WILBUR DEVILBISS (College Park) Supervisor of High Schools 

GRACE L. ALDER Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

MRS. NELL JACOBS Child Care Consultant 

J. WALTER HUFFINGTON Supervisor of Colored School* 

<3T.EN D. BROWN Acting Director of Vocational Education 

ELISABETH AMERY Supervisor of Home Economics 

H. F. COTTERMAN (College Park) *Supervisor of Agriculture 

R. FLOYD CROMWELL Supervisor of Educational and Vocational Guidance 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN Supervisor of Special Education 

THOMAS C. FERGUSON Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ETHEL E. SAMMIS Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ADELENE PRATT (400 Cathedral St.) State Director of Public Libraries 

BESSIE C. STERN Director of Bureau of Educational Measurements 

MERLE S. BATEMAN Director of Teacher Certification and Editor of Publications 

MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS Principal Account Clerk No. 1 

E. SUE WALTER Clerk 

RUTH E. HOBBS Stenographer-Secretary 

ELIZABETH McGINNITY Stenographer-Secretary 

C. ELIZABETH OWINGS Stenographer-Secretary 

ELSIE F. FORMAN Stenographer-Secretary 

E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS Senior Stenographer 

CARRYE HAMBURGER Senior Stenographer 

RUTH TIMANUS Senior Stenographer 

BLANCHE E. KEEN Principal Account Clerk No. 2 

M. ELEANOR RICE Statistical Assistant 

MRS. MARION KOSTER Statistical Assistant 

MARY C. WISKOW Senior Clerk 

R. C. THOMPSON Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

THOMAS D. BRAUN Case Work Rehabilitation Supervisor 

RUTH F. RING Rehabilitation Assistant 

MERL D. MYERS (Easton) Rehabilitation Assistant 

MYRTLE E. CHELL Rehabillitation Assistant 

LIONEL BURGESS Rehabilitation Assistant 

GEORGE KELLER Rehabilitation Assistant 

IRVING MEDINGER Rehabilitation Assistant 

KENNETH G. STONER Rehabilitation Assistant 

EMMA E. THOMAS Medical Social Worker 

MRS. LOUISE O. BOOZE Senior Stenographer 

EMMA E. LUECKERT Stenographer-Secretary 

MRS. C. ELAINE SHIPLEY Senior Stenographer 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

M. THERESA WIEDEFELD, President State Teachers College, Towson 

JOHN L. DUNKLE, President State Teachers College, Frostburg 

J. D. BLACKWELL, President State Teachers College, Salisbury 

WILLIAM E. HENRY, JR., President State Teachers College (For Colored Youth), Bowie 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHER'S RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

911 Lexington Baildinar. Baltimore -1. Md. 

HOOPER S. MILES State Treasurer and Chairman 

J. MILLARD TAWES State Comptroller 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. State Superintendent of Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME .. Superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Vice-Chairman 

ALTHEA FULLER Principal, Allegany County 

THOMAS I. HAYS Secretary 

MINNIE M. HAMILTON Stenographer-Secretary 

HELEN KIRKMAN Senior Clerk 



'Part-time 



MAY 1 1 1946 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS AND SUPERVISORS 

1944-45 



County Address 
ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Charles L, Kopp, Supt. 
Lillian Compton, Asst. Supt. 
Jane Botsford 
Winifred Greene 
Mildred Willison 
Helen Sandfort (Art) 
Richard T. Rizer (High School) 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Geo. Fox, Supt. 
Mrs. Ruth Parker Eason 
Evelyn Keller 
Ruth Dudderar 

Howard A. Kinhart (High School) 
Sarah "V. Jones (Colored Schools) 

B A LTIMORE — Towson 
C. G. Cooper, Supt. 
Edward G. Stapleton, Asst. Supt. 
M. Lucetta Sisk (Curriculum)^ 
Myrtle Eckhardt^ 
Jennie E. Jessop^ 
C. James Velie (Music) ^ 
Olive Jobes (Art)i 
♦Herbert R. Steiner (Physical Ed.) 

CALVERT — Prince Frederick 
Harry R. Hughes, Supt. 
Mattie V. Hardesty 
J. P. Layne (Colored Schools) 

CAROLINE— Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald, Supt. 

A. May Thompson 
♦Mrs. Lulu D. Ward (Colored Schools) 

CARROLL — Westminster 

Raymond S. Hyson, Supt. 
Ruth DeVore 
Charles E. Reck 

Samuel M. Jenness (High School) 
♦May E. Prince (Colored Schools) 

CECIL— Elkton 

H. E. McBride, Supt. 
Olive L. Reynolds 
Edwin H. Barnes (Colored Schools) 

CHARLES— LaPlata 

F. Bernard Gwynn, Supt. 

B. Lucile Bowie 

Joseph C. Parks (Colored Schools) 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 
W. Theodore Boston, Supt. 
Evelyn E. Johnson 
Mrs. Viola S. Comegys (Colored Schools) 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
E. W. Pruitt, Supt. 
Mrs L. Louise Freeman Thompson 
A. Drucilla Worthington 
♦Charles E. Henson (Colored Schools) 

GARRETT— Oakland 

Franklin E. Rathbun, Supt. 
Kate Bannatyne- 
Mrs. Caroline Wilson 



♦ Part time 

1 200 W. Saratoga St., Balto. 1 

2 Grantsville 

3 Havre de Grace 

4 Hyattsvillle 



County Address 
HARFORD— Bel Air 

C. Milton Wright, Supt. 

Benjamin S. Carroll, Asst. Supt. 
Hazel L. Fisher 
Mary L. Grau-' 

Dennis W. Noble (Colored Schools) 

HOWARD— EUicott City 
H. C. Brown, Supt. 
Gail W. Chadwick 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield (Colored Schools) 

KENT — Chestertov^n 

Louis C. Robinson, Supt. 
Mildred Hoyle 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
E. W. Broome, Supt. 
Ethelene Daniel 
Mrs Ruth S. Gue 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Edwards (Phys. Ed.) 

Elizabeth Meany 

Lucille Johnson (Music) 

Marjorie Billows (Art) 

Mrs. Fern D. Schneider (High Schools) 

Edward U. Taylor (Colored Schools) 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
G. Gardner Shugart, Supt, 
William M. Brish, Asst. Supt. 
Rowannetta S. Allen^ 
Mrs. Mary Jane A. Carey (Music) ^ 
G. Russell Hull 
Mrs. Maud Gibbs Hyle 
Mrs. Catherine T. Reed * 
Doswell E. Brooks (Colored Schools) 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centerville 
Franklin D. Day, Supt. 
Mrs. Margaret S. Stack 
Mrs. Lola P. Brown (Colored Schools) 

ST. MARY'S— Leonardtown 
Lettie M. Dent, Supt. 
E. Violette Young 
Ralph S. Waters (Colored Schools) 

SOMERSET — Princess Anne 
C. Allen Carlson, Supt. 
Alice Mae Coulbourn 
Clinton W. Corbin (Colored Schools) 

TALBOT— Easton 

J. Willard Davis, Supt. 

M. Lillian Cheezum 

W. H. Fauntleroy (Colored Schools) 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 
B. C. Willis, Supt. 
Pauline Blackford 
Katherine L. Healy 
Anne Richardson 
Mary Helen Chrissinger (Art) 
Miriam L. Hoffman (Music) 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 

James M. Bennett, Supt. 

Mrs. Leah M. Phillips 

Marie A. Dashiell (Colored School?) 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Arthur C. Humphreys, Supt. 
Margaret Laws 

Mrs. Lucy S. Pilchard (Colored Schools) 



118621 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 5 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff and Number of Public and Non-Public 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 7 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools and Length of Session 8 

Date before Which Children Must Be 6 for Admision to Grade 1 9 

Enrollment in Public and Non-Public Schools, Birth Rates, Ratio of 

High School to Total Enrollment 9 

Percent and Index of Attendance 14 

Grade Enrollment, Elementary Graduates, Non-Promotions, Over- 

Ageness 18 

Education for Handicapped Children in Counties and City 33 

High School Graduates: Number, Persistence and Occupations 35 

High School Enrollment by Year and Subject 44 

Participation of White High School Pupils in Music Activities 53 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 54 

Teachers by Subjects, Clerks, Certification, Sex, Resignations, 

Turnover, Summer School Attendance 57^ 

Number Belonging and Average Salary per Teacher 71 

Number and Size of Schools 85 

Summer Schools, Evening Schools, Adult Education, Vocational Re- 
habilitation, Vocational Training for War Production 91 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Percent from State, Distribution of School Tax Dollar 98 

Cost per Pupil 104 

Cost per Classroom Unit excluding Transportation 115 

Financing the Vocational Education Program 119 

The Adult Education Program 122 

Transportation of Pupils 124 

Capital Outlay, Bonds Outstanding, Value of School Property 129 

1944-45 County Levies; Percent of Levies Used for Schools; Assess- 
ments; Tax Rates; Wealth per Pupil; Individual Income Tax per 

Capita 133 

Parent-Teacher Associations; Other than Public Funds 142 

State and County School Administration and Supervision 143 

The Maryland State Teachers Colleges — Towson, Frostburg, Salisbury 181 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 192 

The State and County Health Program for School Children 193 

The Maryland Public Library Commission Aid to School Libraries 196 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 199 

Index 242 



4 



Baltimore, Jan. 1, 1945 



Honorable Herbert R. O'Conor, 

Governor of Maryland, 
Annapolis, Maryland 
Dear Governor O'Conor: 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77 of the Laws of 
Maryland, the seventy-eighth "annual report, covering all oper- 
ations of the State Department of Education and the support, 
condition, progress, and needs of education throughout the State" 
for the school year ending in June, 1944, is herewith presented 
to you. 

Continuing the policy during the emergency created by war 
conditions of eliminating or limiting State reports to the most 
important and essential data, an abbreviated report similar to 
those issued for the last three years omitting the verbal analysis 
of information included in tables or charts has been prepared. 

The war emergency continued to affect the schools adversely 
because of the great loss of teachers—three times the number in 
normal years. Due to draft or enlistment, the lure of patriotic 
work for the government or industry with monetary returns 
far higher than those paid Maryland teachers, or the desire of 
married teachers to be with their husbands stationed at camps 
and colleges in this country, and many other reasons, a number 
of teachers resigned from their positions and left their classes 
to be taught in many cases by untrained and unqualified teachers 
or substitutes. It is heartening to know that the number and 
percent of county white teachers leaving the service was slightly 
lower in 1943-44 than in 1942-43 which showed turnover at its 
highest peak. Undoubtedly the State bonus in effect from July 
1943 through April 1944 as a result of the enactment of Chapter 
739 of the Laws of 1943 brought some results. Your call for a 
special session of the Legislature in March 1944 with the specific 
purpose of providing for a continuation of State aid for adjusted 
compensation of teachers resulted in the enactment of Chapter 3 
of the Laws of 1944. This made provision for payments of $20 
per month for twelve school months from May 1944 through June 
1945, the State to pay $180 for nine of the twelve months and 
the local unit to be responsible for the remaining $60 for three 
months. Over and above the $200 bonus the counties found it 
necessary to provide additional county funds to supplement their 
county salary schedules, over half of which were the same as the 
State minimum salary schedule. 



5 



In some cases the loss of teachers and the migration of 
population to centers of war industry produced overcrowded 
classrooms due in part to lack of buildings and in part to lack 
of teaching personnel. This condition stimulated demand in all 
parts of the State for legislation requiring smaller classes. Re- 
ports from the U. S. Office of Education showed that in number 
of pupils per elementary teacher only Mississippi and North 
Carolina exceeded Maryland. The desire of parents for legis- 
lation requiring a twelve year program for the twenty counties 
having only eleven years was quickened when it was learned 
that there were only two States, Georgia and Virginia, besides 
Maryland which continued to give children less than a twelve 
year program to achieve high school graduation. 

Not only have teachers left their classrooms, but the students 
training to become teachers have deserted the campuses for highly 
paid positions for which special college training was not required. 
The number enrolled in 1943-44 at Towson, Frostburg, and 
Salisbury was 537 compared with 1013 six years before in 1938- 
39. These colleges accelerated their programs and permitted 
seniors and in some cases juniors to become cadets in the county 
schools before receiving their degrees. The decrease in the num- 
ber of students training for teaching will be felt for many years 
in the future. 

The children are those who will suffer. It is not difficult to 
visualize conditions in classrooms put in charge of a series of 
substitutes, many incapable of coping with the situation. When 
called on to give more efficient instruction in mathematics, 
science, English, physical fitness, the social studies, business, 
agriculture, home economics, and industrial work, the schools are 
asked to do it with fewer and less well prepared teachers. How- 
ever, those well trained experienced teachers who appreciate 
the importance of education in the war emergency and post-war 
world are worthy of the highest praise for the work they are 
doing under most difficult conditions. This report shows that 
most of the schools are carrying on and doing good work even 
under adverse conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Secretary Treasurer. 

State Board of Education 
Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Wendell D. Allen, Vice-President 
Harry Y. George 
Horace M. Morgan 
Nicholas Orem 
Fannie Thalheimer 
Henry C. Whiteford 



6 



TABLE 1 



White and Colored Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Public and Non-Public 
Schools in the Counties and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Type of School 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Grand Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 



Enrollment* 



Public 
City 

Junior High. 

Senior High 

Vocational 

State 

Non-Public 

City. 

State 

Public and Non-public — 

County 

City.. 

State 


106,881 
54,666 


22,259 
26,505 


129,140 
81,171 


45,784 

15',8io 
10,791 
1,442 


5,557 

4^484 
1,822 
378 


51,341 

20^294 
12,613 
1,820 


152,665 

54,666 
15,810 
10,791 
1,442 


27,816 

26,505 
4,484 
1,822 
378 


180,481 

81,171 
20,294 
12,613 
1,820 


161,547 

14,242 
28,789 


48,764 

601 
1,397 


210,311 

14,843 
30,186 


73,827 

4,517 
5,916 


12,241 

26 
218 


86,068 

4,543 
6,134 


235,374 

18,759 
34,705 


61,005 

627 
1,615 


296,379 

19,386 
36,320 


43,031 

121,123 
83,455 


1,998 

22,860 
27,902 


45,029 

143,983 
111,357 


10,433 

50,301 
33,959 


244 

5,583 
6,902 


10,677 

55,884 
40,861 


53,464 

171,424 
117,414 


2,242 

28,443 
34,804 


55,706 

199,867 
152,218 


204,578 


50,762 


255,340 


84,260 


12,485 


96,745 


288,838 


63,247 


352,085 



Teaching Staff 



Public 






















2,714 


591 


3,305 


1,785 


206 


1,991 


4,499 


797 


5,296 




1,416 


654 


2,070 








1,416 


654 


2,070 










591 


iei 


752 


591 


161 


752 










454 


84 


538 


454 


84 


538 










98 


29 


127 


98 


29 


127 




4,130 


1,245 


5,375 


2,928 


480 


3,408 


7,058 


1,725 


8,783 


Non-Public 


































923 


22 


945 


City. . 














1,248 


86 


1,334 


State - 














2,171 


108 


2,279 


Public and Non-Public 


































5,422 


819 


6,241 


City.. 














3,807 


1,014 


4,821 
















9,229 


1,833 


11,062 



Number of Schools 



Public 






















545 


290 


835 


144 


32 


176 


*596 


*296 


*892 


City Elementary 


90 


41 


131 








90 


41 


131 










" 16 




' '26 


16 


4 


20 










7 


2 


9 


7 


2 


9 


Vocational 








7 


1 


8 


7 


1 


8 




635 


331 


966 


*172 


*37 


*209 


*710 


*342 


*1,052 


Non-Public 






















100 


7 


107 


47 


1 


48 


*112 


*7 


*119 


City.. 


95 


9 


104 


29 


3 


32 


*98 


*9 


*107 


State - 


195 


16 


211 


76 


4 


80 


*210 


*16 


*226 


Public and Non-Public 




















County 


645 


297 


942 


191 


33 


224 


*708 


*303 


*1,011 


City. . 


185 


50 


235 


*57 


*8 


*65 


*212 


*55 


*267 


State 


830 


347 


1,177 


*248 


*41 


*289 


*920 


*358 


*1,278 



* Excludes duplicates. 

7 



8 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 2 

Opening and Closing Dates Year Ending June 30, 1944 







Date 


OF Closing Schools in 


1944 




Date of 






















County 


School in 
September, 1943 


Elementary 
Schools 


High Schools 


Allegany 


8 


June 


it) 


June 


1 fi 

ID 




7 


June 


9 


June 


9 




7 


June 


23 


°June 


23 




8 


June 


2 


June 


2 


Caroline 


8 


May 


31 


May 


31 




13 


June 


7 


June 


7 


Cecil 


14 


June 


9 


June 


9 




10 


June 


7 


June 


7 


Dorchester 


8 


June 


2 


June 


2 


Frederick 


13 


June 


2 


June 


2 






June 


9 


June 


9 


Harford § 


8 


June 


15 


§June 


15 


Howard 


8 


June 


8 


June 


8 


Kent 


8 


May 


31 


May 


31 




13 


June 


16 


June 


16 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's* 


9 


June 


16 


June 


16 


8 


*May 


30 


*May 


30 


St. Mary'st 


15 


June 


9 


tJune 


8 




7 


May 


31 


May 


31 


Talbot 


9 


June 


2 


June 


2 


Washington 


13 


June 


9 


June 


9 




7 


May 


31 


May 


31 




1 


May 


29 


May 


29 


Baltimore City 


7 


June 


16 


June 


16 



* May 30 for white and May 26 for colored pupils. 
° June 9 for seniors. 



t June 9 for colored high school pupils. 
§ June 8 for seniors 



TABLE 3 



Number of County Schools in Session Fewer than 180 Days 
Year Ending June 30, 1944 





For All Counties By Year — 




For 1944 By County- 






Schools 








Schools 




Year 






Having 


County 






Larger 






Having 


More 






Having 


Ele- 




Total 


One 


Than One 




Total 


One 


mentary 




No. 


Teacher 


Teacher 




No. 


Teacher 


Schools 


Schools for White Pupils 


1926 


124 


109 


15 


Anne Arundel. 


1 




al 


1930 


28 
33 


22 


6 




2 


bi 


bl 


1935 


18 


15 


Dorchester . . . 


1 


cl 


1943 


12 

8 


7 


5 


Garrett 


3 


d3 




1944 


4 


4 


Pr. George's. . 


1 


el 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


1941 


12 


11 


1 


Anne Arundel. 


1 


al 




1942 


6 


5 


1 


Calvert 


2 


f2 




1943 


4 




4 






gl 




1944 


5 


"5 




Pr. George's. . 


1 


gl 





a 179 days, b 177 days, c 173 days. 

d One school open 158 days, one 167.5 days, and one 170.5 days. 

e School in a new development opened in October and was in session 157 days. 

f One school open 172 days and one 174 days. 

g 175 days. 



Length of Session; Admission to Grade 1; 
Elementary School Enrollment 



9 



TABLE 4 



County and City Regulations Regarding Admission of Children Who Will 
Become Six Years Old in Succeeding Months to Grade 1 in September, 1943 



Date on or before Which 


Number 




Child Must Become 6 


of 


Names of Counties 


before Admission 


Counties 




Preceding September 






October 1 


1 


Charles 


November 15 


1 


Baltimore City 




4 


Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, fMontgomery 


January 1 


13 


Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Calvert, Caroline, 




Dorchester, Garrett, Howard, Prince George's, 






St. Mary's, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico 




5 


Harford, Kent, Queen Anne's, Washington, Worcester 


*March 31 


*1 


♦Baltimore City 



tChildren reaching the age of six years before December 1 should be admitted and encouraged 
to enter the first grade the first week of school, provided they are not enrolled in kindergarten, 
if they expect to enter school during the year. 
♦For pupils entering in February. 



TABLE 5 — Total Enrollment in Maryland Elementary Schools, 
White and Colored for Years Ending in June 1923, 1943 and 1944 



County 



White Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



1943 



1944 



County 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



1943 



1944 



Total Counties. 

Baltimore 

Prince George's 
Montgomery . . . 

Allegany 

Washington .... 
Anne Arundel . . 

Frederick 

Harford 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Garrett 

Wicomico 

Howard 

Dorchester. . . . 

Charles 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's . . 

Kent 

St. Mary's. . . . 
Calvert 

Baltimore City . 

Entire State. . . 



*°105,772 

°13,154 
6,421 
4,524 

°10,985 
10,859 
4,947 
8,505 
4,290 
5,902 
3,405 
5,373 
3,986 
2,241 
3,432 
1,803 
3,025 
2,298 
3,059 
2,105 
2,101 
1,748 
2,117 
1,060 

*t79,709 

*tl85,481 



*°114,763 

t°19,532 
tl3,513 
tl2,396 
t°ll,215 
no, 352 
7,501 
6,328 
t4,875 
t4,487 
3,421 
3,469 
°2,950 
2,494 
2,226 
1,767 
tl,667 
1,655 
1,556 
tl,422 
1,281 
1,124 
1,183 
849 

*t65,904 

•=tl80,667 



'=°115,093 

t°20,495 
tl3,770 
tl2,298 
t°ll,180 
tl0,224 
7,811 
6,154 
t4,778 
t4,509 
3,572 
3,378 
°2,811 
2,398 
2,153 
1,742 
tl,650 
1,577 
1,480 
tl,390 
1,223 
1,085 
1,067 
821 

*t65,708 

^180,801 



Total Counties. 

Prince George's 
Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Montgomery . . . 

Charles 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Calvert 

Dorchester. . . . 

Talbot 

Harford 

St. Mary's. . . . 

Frederick 

Kent 

Howard 

Caroline 

Queen Anne 's . . 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Washington 

Allegany 



Baltimore City . 
Entire State. . . 



♦31,070 

2,781 
2,853 
1,942 
1,898 
1,803 
2,255 
1,675 
2,088 
1,343 
1,947 
1,373 
916 
1,404 



,150 
,188 
848 
,188 
,093 
548 
440 
377 
267 



*tl5,675 
*t46,745 



t*°22,740 

°3,013 
°2,935 
tl,973 
1,639 
1,398 
1,183 
1,162 
1,173 
1,093 
1,099 
786 
741 
734 
691 
608 
592 
590 
537 
361 
t277 
t237 
tl85 



*t29,245 
*t51,985 



t*°22,624 

°3,066 
°2,927 
t2,074 
tl,740 
1,420 
1,148 
1,119 
1,103 
1,078 
1,044 
779 
761 
701 
666 
584 
578 
559 
521 
338 
t255 
t215 
tl81 



*t29,857 
*t52,481 



* Totals exclude duplicates. 

t Includes estimate of enrollment in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools. 
° Excludes enrollment in elementary schools of State teachers colleges: 



College 1923 

Towson 179 

Frostburg 122 

Salisbury 



1943 1944 

232 249 

173 165 

85 79 



College 

Bowie 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Prince George's. 



1943 
133 
26 
107 



1944 
112 

22 
90 



For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization, see Table II, 
pages 204 - 205. 



10 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 6 

Total Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland High Schools 
for Years Ending in June 1923, 1943, and 1944 



County 


White Enrollment 
in High Schools 


1923 


1943 


1944 


Total Counties. . . 


*14,888 


*t39,448 


*t37,572 


Baltimore 


1,512 


t6,478 


t6,410 


Prince George's. . 


824 


t4,081 


t3,988 




1,665 


14,013 


13 , 564 


Montgomery 


609 


t3,220 


t2,976 


Anne Arundel .... 


454 


2,695 


2,650 


Washington 


1,281 


t2,581 


t2,484 


Frederick 


1,421 


2,393 


2,374 


Carroll 


775 


1,809 


1,703 


Harford 


651 


tl,627 


tl , 582 


Cecil 


514 


1,300 


1,215 


Wicomico 


901 


1,258 


1,186 




449 


1,221 


1,108 


Dorchester 


558 


967 


926 


Caroline 


597 


t836 


t773 




649 


801 


732 




284 


771 


716 


Charles 


99 


619 


597 


Talbot 


437 


t625 


t593 




462 


662 


551 


Queen Anne 's . . . . 


403 


502 


484 


Kent 


282 


513 


475 


St. Mary's 


23 


457 


432 


Calvert 


143 


255 


267 


Baltimore City . . . 


*tll,465 


*tl8,485 


*tl7,001 


Entire State 


*t26,353 


*t57,933 


*t54,573 



County 



Total Counties. 

Anne Arundel . . 

Wicomico 

Prince George's 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

Worcester 

Montgomery . . . 

Frederick 

Talbot 

Harford 

St. Mary's .... 

Kent 

Caroline 

Queen Anne's. . 

Calvert . 

Cecil 

Howard 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Washington 



Baltimore City . 
Entire State. . . 



Colored Enrollment 
in High Schools 



1923 



*447 



58 
117 



36 



*tl,331 
*tl,778 



1943 



*t5,112 

579 
433 
391 
372 
350 
321 
t313 
331 
387 
194 
213 
182 
177 
137 
172 
139 
134 
134 
107 

tioi 

t63 
t52 



*t3,595 
*t8,859 



♦ Excludes duplicates. 

t Includes estimated eighth or ninth grade enrollment in junior high schools and enrollment in vo- 
cational schools. 

For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization, see Table II, 
pages 204 to 205. 



Public High School Enrollment; Public and Non-Public 11 
School Enrollment 



TABLE 7 — Comparison of Enrollment in Counties and Baltimore City 
in Public and Non-Public Schools. 1930 to 1944 



Year 


Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Non-Public Schools 


"Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


"Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



°White Elementary School Enrollment 



1930 


118,711 


109,159 


108,737 


78, 


133 


8,722 


29,002 


1,258 


2,024 


1932 


121,923 


108,720 


111,370 


76 


949 


9,321 


29,954 


1,232 


1,817 


1933 


123,224 


108^420 


112^509 


76 


426 


9,636 


30,399 


1,079 


1,595 


1935 


122,559 


107,192 


111,696 


74, 


818 


9,622 


30,735 


1,241 


1,639 


1936 


121,857 


107,230 


110,938 


75, 


316 


9,698 


30,171 


1,221 


1,743 


1937 


122,247 


105,173 


110,955 


73, 


452 


9,785 


29,817 


1,507 


1,904 


1938 


121,422 


103,094 


109,636 


71, 


392 


9,933 


29;384 


1,853 


2,318 


1939 


121,137 


100,250 


109,579 


68, 


863 


9,823 


29,090 


1,735 


2,297 


1940 


120,719 


96,947 


109,154 


66, 


896 


9,828 


27,947 


1,737 


2,104 


1941 


121,932 


95,401 


110,021 


65, 


732 


10,082 


27^371 


1,830 


2,298 


1942 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65, 


123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94 , 780 


115,253 


65, 


904 


11,059 


26,104 


2,124 


2,772 


1944 


129,828 


94,497 


*115,586 


*65, 


708 


til, 797 


26,010 


t2,445 


t2,779 



White High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1930 


27,893 


18,167 


24,760 


14,139 


1,480 


3,150 


1,653 


878 


1932 


31,775 


21,560 


28,547 


17,173 


1,574 


3,553 


1,654 


834 


1933 


33,678 


23,399 


30,778 


18,920 


1,542 


3,755 


1,358 


724 


1935 


34,823 


24,679 


31,786 


19,897 


1,592 


4,023 


1,445 


759 


1936 


36,249 


25,438 


33,111 


20,416 


1,587 


4,211 


1,551 


811 


1937 


37,313 


25,365 


33,959 


20,012 


1,707 


4,435 


1,647 


918 


1938 


38,007 


25,111 


34,415 


19,712 


1,787 


4,562 


1,805 


837 


1939 


40,496 


26,410 


36,637 


20,997 


2,022 


4,610 


1,837 


803 


1940 


42,273 


27,093 


38,492 


21,421 


2,083 


4,841 


1,698 


831 


1941 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


39,448 


18,485 


2,711 


4,705 


1,722 


830 


1944 


42,089 


22,917 


♦37,572 


♦17,001 


t2,924 


t5,087 


tl,593 


t829 



'Colored Elementary School Enrollment 



27,367 


22,068 


26,759 


20,643 


582 


1,347 


26 


78 


27,169 


23,560 


26,558 


22,289 


583 


1,211 


28 


60 


27,312 


24,412 


26,708 


22,914 


604 


1,425 




73 


26,451 


26,702 


25,908 


25,189 


543 


1,392 




121 


25,828 


27,860 


25,328 


26,328 


497 


1,424 


3 


108 


25,221 


28,519 


24,698 


27,038 


523 


1,382 




99 


24,693 


28,131 


24,133 


26,686 


537 


1,360 


23 


85 


24", 604 


29,830 


24,052 


28,374 


529 


1,367 


23 


89 


24,328 


29,877 


23,809 


28,408 


519 


1,393 




76 


24,114 


30,515 


23,552 


29,112 


562 


1,335 




68 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


29,247 


609 


1,249 




50 


23,505 


30,553 


22,873 


29,245 


632 


1,253 




55 


23,337 


31,254 


♦22,736 


♦29,857 


t601 


1,334 




t63 



Colored High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1930 


2,099 


2,351 


1,953 


2,335 


1932 


2,589 


2,812 


2,489 


2,794 


1933 


2,808 


3,134 


2,750 


3,114 


1935 


3,053 


3,199 


3,019 


3,164 


1936 


3,547 


3,211 


' 3,544 


3,176 


1937 


4,030 


3,322 


4,030 


3,246 


1938 


4,338 


3,480 


4.334 


3,378 


1939 


4,567 


3,838 


4,567 


3,714 


1940 


4,818 


4,149 


4,818 


4,033 


1941 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 


1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 


1943 


5,264 


3,765 


5,264 


3,595 


1944 


5,218 


3,550 


♦5,192 


♦3,332 



t26 



15 


95 


1 


18 


25 




14 


11 


6 


11 


34 


24 


14 


3 


21 


58 




18 


84 




18 


106 




18 


97 




19 


112 




19 


128 




13 


154 




16 


t205 




tl3 



° Includes for county public schools enrollment in elementary schools of State normal schools 
or teachers colleges. 

♦ For public school enrollment in detail by counties and Baltimore City see Table II, pages 
204 to 205. 

t For non-public school enrollment in detail by school, county and Baltimore City, see Tables 
III-V. pages 206 to 210. 



12 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 8 



Recorded and Resident Birth Rates per 1,000 White and Colored Population 

Reported by Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 





Recorded Birth Rates 


Resident Birth Rates* 


County 


1920 


1930 


1935 


1940 


1942 


1943 


1935 


1940 


1942 


1943 



White 



County Average 


23.5 


17.4 


14.3 


13.4 


15.3 


16.1 


17.0 


18.7 


23 .3 


24.5 




27.1 


22.2 


20.4 


2?. 7 


24.9 


24.9 


19.5 


20.0 


21.8 


22.0 




20.2 


14.4 


13.8 


11.3 


15.4 


17.7 


16.9 


16.9 


25.3 


26.9 




21.5 


13.9 


8.1 


6.4 


7.5 


7.4 


14.5 


18.8 


26.1 


27.9 




26.6 


22.2 


19.8 


21.2 


17.6 


23.7 


20.6 


21.2 


19.5 


24.4 


Caroline 


23.1 


16.5 


16.6 


15.4 


16.7 


19.5 


19.5 


17.4 


18.3 


21.0 




22.1 


15.1 


13.0 


10.6 


10.2 


10.7 


16.5 


17.4 


19.3 


20.6 


Cecil 


22.4 


19.9 


15.7 


16.1 


16.3 


21.2 


17.7 


18.4 


19.3 


24.8 




23.6 


20.1 


17.2 


17.1 


22.4 


24.1 


23.2 


20.1 


28.1 


29.5 




26.9 


19.2 


15.5 


14.6 


17.4 


17.8 


15.3 


15.2 


17.8 


18.0 




25.0 


20.2 


17.6 


17.3 


21.1 


23.5 


17.2 


16.9 


19.9 


21.4 




28.4 


24.2 


24.3 


21.1 


19.7 


20.7 


25.8 


24.1 


24.1 


25.7 


Harford 


18.6 


17.8 


14.0 


13.1 


22.7 


24.6 


16.7 


18.3 


28.2 


27.3 




22.8 


14.9 


13.9 


11.5 


11.8 


11.3 


19.1 


21.2 


22.0 


23.5 


Kent 


21.5 


12.6 


11.8 


16.1 


16.6 


18.6 


12.6 


17.7 


16.4 


16.5 




20.9 


13.6 


14.9 


11.5 


14.8 


13.2 


18.7 


20.7 


26.5 


25.5 


Prince George's 


20.9 


11.4 


7.5 


4.5 


5.6 


9.5 


19.2 


19.3 


25.9 


28.4 




21.1 


18.1 


13.1 


11.3 


10.6 


9.0 


14.6 


15.3 


17.6 


19.8 




26.8 


26.7 


25.8 


24.2 


23.4 


25.0 


25.5 


24.6 


23.9 


26.6 




24.7 


17.9 


14.6 


13.9 


13.1 


13.2 


14.2 


16.5 


17.0 


17.6 


Talbot 


22.0 


19.4 


16.9 


20.5 


23.1 


27.4 


13.4 


16.5 


16.2 


18.5 




26.9 


20.4 


17.5 


18.3 


21.8 


21.6 


17.7 


18.4 


21.8 


21.5 




22.3 


18.4 


14.0 


21.8 


25.8 


28.6 


12.3 


17.0 


18.3 


18.8 




20.0 


15.7 


9.3 


10.7 


13.4 


10.1 


11.9 


14.5 


17.1 


16.8 


Baltimore City 


25.3 


17.6 


15.4 


18.1 


25.5 


26.4 


13.7 


14.6 


20.0 


20.6 


Entire State 


24.5 


17.5 


14.9 


15.6 


20.0 


20.9 


15.5 


16.7 


21.8 


22.7 


Colored 




28.6 


23.5 


26.7 


19.8 


20.6 


20.5 


22.9 


24.9 


25.4 


24.9 




29.3 


18.7 


15.0 


25.0 


34.0 


28.4 


15.0 


24.3 


32.4 


26.1 


Anne Arundel 


29.1 


25.6 


20.2 


19.4 


18.7 


18.1 


25.3 


27.3 


25.1 


23.1 




25.2 


15.1 


9.3 


8.9 


10.6 


13.2 


16.8 


22.1 


21.4 


27.0 




31.8 


32.7 


29.0 


27.6 


27.6 


32.0 


29.0 


28.0 


28.0 


32.6 




26.1 


24.5 


20.7 


25.9 


27.2 


26.7 


21.7 


26.4 


29.9 


30.4 


Carroll 


30.5 


22.1 


17.4 


17.2 


25.1 


19.5 


19.7 


21.5 


31.5 


21.1 


Cecil 


26.3 


20.4 


25.7 


19.6 


19.6 


22.1 


25.3 


20.9 


19.2 


22.1 




35.5 


30.8 


29.4 


30.1 


29.8 


30.0 


31.0 


35.2 


33.6 


32.4 




31.0 


22.2 


19.7 


22.9 


25.1 


23.7 


19.5 


22.7 


25.2 


24.3 




29.6 


26.1 


19.8 


24.2 


26.1 


26.4 


20.2 


24.4 


25.7 


26.4 




19.2 


29.1 


20.1 


19.3 


19.7 


16.4 


22.0 


22.1 


21.3 


17.7 




30.3 


20.2 


21.3 


18.3 


17.6 


21.1 


24.4 


26.5 


23.5 


29.1 


Kent 


29.0 


23.4 


19.4 


21.9 


22.5 


24.2 


20.1 


23.1 


23.5 


25.2 




28.3 


22.7 


19.2 


17.3 


17.4 


17.5 


21.5 


22.6 


22.0 


21.0 


Prince George's 


27.0 


21.7 


17.9 


10.3 


9.5 


9.9 


26.2 


26.7 


25.9 


23.1 


Queen Anne's 


22.3 


19.4 


18.7 


19.3 


20.3 


15.6 


18.9 


20.2 


23.0 


18.5 




33.3 


27.4 


24.5 


30.1 


29.3 


31.3 


25.0 


31.5 


30.5 


33.8 




31.2 


22.2 


22.2 


21.5 


20.7 


25.5 


23.4 


23.9 


22.1 


28.1 




28.1 


19.8 


22.1 


23.6 


30.9 


25.1 


21.4 


22.0 


28.2 


21.2 


Washington 


19.7 


13.4 


12.6 


20.7 


21.2 


17.5 


13.0 


23.5 


21.7 


17.5 




30.9 


25.9 


23.9 


22.6 


28.4 


25.5 


21.5 


20.1 


23.9 


22.2 




26.8 


28.3 


23.4 


22.2 


24.0 


24.5 


24.0 


24.1 


27.5 


26.3 


Baltimore City 


26.1 


22.6 


19.5 


23.3 


26.6 


27.6 


18.5 


21.6 


25.1 


25.9 




27.5 


23.1 


20.0 


21.7 


24.0 


24.5 


20.5 


22.8 


25.2 


25.5 



* Prior to 1935, birth rates were calculated on births occurring in the indicated areas and are 
shown under the heading "Recorded Birth Rates." For 1935, 1940, 1942, and 1943, birth rates are 
shown by residence of mother, and according to location of birth. 



Birth Rates; Ratio of High School to Total Enrollment 



13 



TABLE 9 

Ratio of "Number Belonging" in High Schools to "Number Belonging" in 
Elementary and High Schools Combined, for School Years Ending in 
June 1924, 1941, 1943 and 1944 



County 



Schools for White Pupils 


County 


1924 


1941 


1943 


al944 


13 


.3 


§26.3 


§25.0 


§24 


.3 


County Average. . . 


18 


.8 


32 


2 


32.8 


31 


.7 


Carroll 


18 


9 


30 


3 


32.7 


31 


7 


Wicomico 


15 


2 


30 


6 


31.5 


30 


6 


Cecil 


3 





35 


6 


30.2 


30 


5 


Dorchester 


16 


7 


29 


2 


29.8 


30 





Allegany 


18 


7 


30 


7 


30.4 


29 


9 




19 


9 


§29 


1 


§29.5 


§29.0 




18 


3 


27 


7 


28.0 


28 


3 


Kent 


13 


7 


29 





28.6 


27 


7 


Somerset 


14 


9 


27 


1 


27.1 


27 


5 




15 


2 


28 


2 


28.9 


26 


8 


Worcester 


xlO 


2 


29 


2 


26.8 


25 


9 


Washington x 


14 


3 


30 


4 


27.7 


25 


8 




15 


5 


21 





23.1 


25 


5 




5 


5 


29 


2 


25.8 


25 


2 


Talbot 


14 


8 


27 





25.1 


25 





Harford 


8 


4 


24 


5 


25.4 


24 


3 


Anne Arundel 


12 


7 


26 


5 


24.4 


24 





Howard 


11 





§26.4 


§24.5 


§23 


8 


Baltimore 


13 


5 


§26.7 


§24.8 


§23 


4 


Montgomery 


11 


6 


25 


4 


23.0 


22 


6 


Calvert 


13 


9 


x23 


5 


X20.5 


xl9 


5 


Prince George's. . . 


11 


1 


20 





19.2 


19 





12 


1 


25 


2 


22.3 


21 


5 


Baltimore City xj 


13 


2 


§26.0 


§24.0 


§23.3 


Total State 



Schools for Colored Pupils 



1924 



1941 



County Average. 

Worcester 

Caroline 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Wicomico 

Queen Anne's . . . . 

Carroll 

Frederick 

Somerset 

Anne Arundel . . . . 

Cecil 

Calvert 

Charles 

Harford 

Garrett 

Howard 

Baltimore 

Allegany x 

Prince George's. . 
Montgomery x. . . 
Washington x . . . . 

Baltimore City xj 

Total State 



2.0 

4.0 
6.0 

"4;7 

11. 
2.0 
6.7 
3.0 
1.6 
2.3 



1.8 

's.o 



2.5 
7.8 



1.5 

9.2 
4.8 



§17.4 

25 

25.2 

23. 

22. 

32.6 

18.8 

19.8 

21.6 

16.9 

21.9 

20.2 

17.7 

20.6 

20.1 

19.5 

18.0 

§12.7 
8.6 

tl4.0 
16.8 
12.4 

§14.2 



*12.3 
§14.9 



§ Includes pupils enrolled in elementary schooKs) of State Teachers College(s). 

X County has 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization in all or part of schools as against 7-4 or 6-5 plan 
in remaining counties. Montgomery white schools & Baltimore City have a number of kindergartens. 

* Excludes Baltimore County pupils who attended high schools in Baltimore City at the expense 
of Baltimore County. 

t Vocational and ninth year of high schools are included with senior high schools. 

a For number belonging by types of schools, arranged alphabetically, see Table VI, page 211. 

t Includes Baltimore County pupils who attended school in Baltimore City at the expense 
of Baltimore County. 



14 1944 Report op Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 10 

Percent of Attendance in White and Colored Elementary Schools for School 
Years Ending in June 1923, 1941, 1943 and 1944 



County 



County Average 

Allegany ...... 

Dorchester. ... 

Frederick 

Queen Anne's. . 

Kent 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Washington 

Talbot 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Garrett 

Prince George's, 

Calvert 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Charles . 

Howard 

Worcester 

St. Mary's. . . . 

Harford 

Montgomery. . . 
Cecil 

Baltimore City . 

Total State 



White Schools 



1923 1941 1943 1944 



°84.2 
°88.9 



°91.7 



92 
92 
92 
92 
t90 
91 
*92 
t90 
192 
°91 
91 
92 
91 
91 
t°91 
89 
90 
t89 
91 
t89 
*90 
89 



*90.3 
91.2 



=90.0 



*°92. 
91, 
91, 
92, 
90, 
t92, 
91 
*89, 
t92 
t91 
°91 
90 
90 



t°89.0 

88." 

86. 
t90. 

88. 
t87. 
*88. 

86.8 

*87.8 
89.2 



°89. 

= °92 

92 

91 

91 

91 
t91 

90 
*90 
t90.6 
t90.4 
°90 

90.2 

90 

89.9 

89.2 
t-°88.4 

88.3 

88.3 

88.2 

88.0 
t87.3 
*86.9 

86.5 

*86.7 



County 



County Average 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Allegany 

Wicomico 

Washington 

Dorchester 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Talbot 

Anne Arundel . . 
Prince George's, 

Kent 

Somerset 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Baltimore 

Montgomery. . . 

Howard 

Harford 

Charles 

Calvert 

Worcester 

St. Mary's. . . . 



Baltimore City . 
Total State 



Colored Schools 



1923 1941 1943 1944 



76.2 

73.1 

87.4 

84.8 

81.7 

74.2 

76.4 

84.6 

84 

71 

76 

73 

80 

74 

72.0 
75.4 
80 

71.0 
79.9 
66.8 
65.3 
80.1 
62.9 



87.0 
79.9 



=87.6 



93.2 
*92.6 
90.2 
*93.4 
84.7 
87.8 
90.8 
90.6 
°89.7 
°90.7 
89.7 
89.8 
89.3 
t82.8 
t88.3 
87.2 
85.6 
82.8 
81.0 
81.8 
82.7 



*87.7 
87.7 



=86.5 



*94 
90 
*91 



90 



2 
6 
4 

1 
5 
7 

88.1 
°87.9 
°88.0 
86.5 
90.8 
84.4 

tsi. 

t85. 
86.5 
82.9 
83.9 
80.2 
80.3 
83.2 
79.7 



*86. 



°86.3 

*93.4 
92.7 
90.9 
*90.5 
90.3 
89.5 
89.4 
89.4 
°87.9 
°87.6 
87.5 
86.3 
85.9 
t85.9 
t85.7 
*85.6 
84.5 
84.2 
81.1 



*86.7 
86.6 



* Includes junior high schools, grades 7-8. 
t Includes junior high schools, grade 7. 

For attendance in 1944 arranged alphabetically and by type of organization, see Tabh VIII, 

paee 213. 

Excludes percent of attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: 

State Teachers College 

Frostburg 

Towson 

Salisbury 

Bowie 

Anne Arundel 

Prince George's 



1923 


1941 


1943 


1944 


92.2 


94.8 


93.7 


95,0 


87.4 


91.1 


90.4 


90.4 




93.0 


93.8 


90.6 




95.6 


86.1 


92.0 




91.1 


79.4 


90.5 




96.1 


88.1 


92.3 



Percent of Attendance in Elementary Schools 



to CO eO O « «0 U5 lO IC (N 1-t «0 -"f N « P5 N M a> «D 

OS (Nc^ic^'iNr-IrHT-Iooooooasasaiooooooooc-totci 

OO 05 CT) OS 05 0> OJ 05 a> OS OS 05 05 CT> 00 00 00 00 00 00 OO 00 op QO 

o o * H— »-* o -t— -t— * 



i-< C<J<005'^"^0500«CirHO>rHOJt-t-i-l000505 05 00t-t-t- 

Q c^',Hi-H,H(N(MOOJiM'-l»-IOrH00030500«£>OOOt-OOtO 

o> OS 05 oj 05 05 05 oi 00 05 05 o) a> 05 00 X 00 00 00 00 05 QO OO 00 

o o * H — I—* o -i— 



ec cc lo CO eo o» OS 00 1- in CO o ec • -osiHOOTjieooscoeo 



frt r! tl 



< 2 



01 O 



t3 
to fl 



73 O 



Sjo^-j £-1 ^ i e ^ i si § 



W C3 



•^t-M^Oi-tOOOUlTtC^lOSt-^O^T-IOt-iniHt-OOOO 



(M0>00 00 00«"5OT-lt--<iit>t-«)«>0>rHWeC0S00iM00 



ect-wosooix>ost-t-eOTj<eoeot-u5U5?D05«o-^ooosu5 



d S § 



aj O 

bo. 



a 
O 



as 

J3H 



<M OS in OS W CO (M r-l (M t- (N 00 eo T-l «o <N ;e 

OS CO CO N rH 1-H ^' rH Os' 00 00* t> t-" t> t-' l«* «D in 

00 OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS 00 00 00 00 M 00 00 00 00 00 

t- in Tf T-i eo OS <o t> iH OS in t- in in t> OS • • • -in 

O CO tH N >-( i-H t- O OS t- t> 00 00 <0 <C 00 OS w ■ ■ . .-^ 

OS OS OS OJ OS OS OS 00 OS 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 W 00 • • • -OS 

OS eoot-os«cost-teoeoeoinMt-r-tt-eoNoowcoMeoo 

O t-* t-* i-H CO OS N O i-J CO t-' N iH C^' Oo' r-I Os" Oo' t-' N t-' Oo" b-' 

00 00 t- 00 00 t- 00 00 00 00 t~ 00 00 00 t- 00 t- t- 00 t- 00 00 t- 




16 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 12 

An Index of School Attendance in County Elementary Schools,* White and 
Colored, for School Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


Percent of 


Rank in Percent op 
















tAttend- 


JLate 


"With- 


tAttend- 


JLate 


°With- 




ance 


Entrants 


drawals 


ance 


Entrants 


drawals 



White Schools 



County Average 


89.6 


.6 


1.6 










91.7 


.2 


.4 


4 


3 


1 


Prince George's 


90.1 


.2 


1.1 


13 


2 


3 




91.9 


.5 


1.2 


3 


12 


5 




90.7 


.1 


1.6 


7 


1 


13 




90.2 


.4 


1.2 


12 


7 


4 




92.3 


.3 


2.0 


1 


5 


19 




92.2 


.7 


1.5 


2 


14 


10 




89.2 


.5 


.9 


15 


10 


2 




91.3 


.9 


1.4 


6 


17 


7 




90.6 


.3 


1.7 


9 


6 


15 


Carroll 


90.4 


.9 


1.3 


10 


19 


6 




88.4 


.4 


1.5 


16 


9 


11 




90.3 


.3 


3.1 


11 


4 


23 




88.3 


.6 


1.5 


17 


13 


9 


Calvert 


89.9 


.5 


1.7 


14 


11 


16 


Kent 


91.6 


.9 


2.0 


5 


18 


20 


Washington 


90.7 


1.5 


1.6 


8 


23 


12 


Cecil 


86.5 


.8 


1.4 


23 


16 


8 




86.9 


.4 


1.9 


22 


8 


18 




88.3 


1.3 


1.9 


18 


21 


17 




88.0 


1.4 


1.6 


20 


22 


14 




88.2 


.7 


2.7 


19 


15 


22 




87.3 


.9 


2.7 


21 


20 


21 



Colored Schools 



County Average 

Queen Anne's. .. 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Washington 

Anne Arundel . , , 
Allegany ....... 

Baltimore 

CarroU 

Prince George's, 

Frederick 

Howard 

Somerset 

Cecil 

Harford 

Montgomery . . . 

Charles 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Kent 

Worcester 

Talbot 

St. Mary's. . . . 



86.3 


2.3 


2.1 








93.4 


.4 


.4 


1 


1 


I 


90.3 


2.1 


1.0 


5 


9 


3 


90.9 


1.0 


2.2 


3 


4 


11 


90.5 


2.3 


1.9 


4 


12 


6 


87.9 


2.1 


1.1 


9 


10 


4 


92.7 


1.6 


2.7 


2 


7 


18 


85.7 


1.0 


2.0 


15 


3 


9 


85.9 


1.6 


1.9 


14 


6 


8 


87.6 


1.3 


2.4 


10 


5 


15 


89.4 


2.4 


2.2 


7 


13 


13 


84.5 


2.4 


.9 


17 


15 


2 


86.3 


.9 


3.1 


12 


2 


20 


85.9 


1.7 


2.6 


13 


8 


16 


84.2 


2.7 


1.3 


18 


16 


5 


85.6 


2.8 


2.0 


16 


17 


10 


81.1 
80.9 


2.9 


1.9 


19 


18 


7 


2.4 


2.3 


20 


14 


14 


89.5 


6.5 


3.7 


6 


22 


21 


87.5 


3.7 


2.9 


11 


19 


19 


80.5 


2.3 


2.7 


21 


11 


17 


89.4 


5.8 


4.1 


8 


20 


22 


78.9 


6.0 


2.2 


22 


21 


12 



♦Excludes elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. ^ t,,. TrrTT ,.o„^9iq 

t For percent of attendance by counties arranged alphabetically see Table VIII, page ^Id. 

X Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. The county having the smallest per- 
centage of late entrants is ranked first. ^ ■ ^-t, ^, Ar.^*^y^ 

" Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, commitment to institutions, or deatti. 
The county having the smallest percentage of withdrawals is ranked first. 



Index of Elementary School Attendance ; High School Attendance 17 



TABLE 13 

Percent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools for Year Ending 
June 1923, 1938, 1943 and 1944 



County 



White High Schools 



1923 1938 1943 1944 



County 



Colored High Schools 



1923 1938 1943 1944 



County Average 

Frederick 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Wicomico , 

Allegany 

Washington 

Carroll 

Somerset , 

Calvert 

Dorchester. ... 

Baltimore 

Charles 

Prince George's. 

Howard 

Anne Arundel . . 

Talbot 

Montgomery 

Kent 

Caroline 

Garrett. ..... 

Harford 

Worcester 

Cecil 

St. Mary's. . . . 

Baltimore City° 

Total State 



91.9 



91.5 
91.6 



94.7 

96.2 
95.2 
96.0 
95.4 
95.8 
95.1 
96.0 
94.0 
95.4 
94.6 
94.3 
95.0 
93.8 
95.1 
93.0 
93.1 
95.2 
92.5 
93.5 
93.2 
93.8 
93.9 
93.4 

94.7 

94.7 



91.5 

94.3 
92.7 
94.3 
92.8 
92.4 
92.5 
92.2 
91.8 
91.0 
91.7 
90.9 
91.9 
91.0 
90.6 
91.5 
90.2 
90.8 
88.9 
89.8 
89.4 
90.0 
87.6 
89.5 

92.0 

91.7 



91.8 

94.4 
94.1 
94.0 
93.7 
93.3 
92.7 
92.5 
92.3 
91.7 
91.7 
91.4 
91.4 
91.0 
91.0 
91.0 
90.7 
90.2 
90.1 
90.1 
90.0 
89 

88.5 
87.3 

91.3 

91.6 



County Average 

Allegany 

Wicomico 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Frederick 

Washington 

Carroll 

Baltimore 

Harford 

Dorchester. ... 

Kent 

Anne Arundel . . , 

Calvert 

Somerset 

Montgomery ... 

Talbot 

Prince George's. 

Worcester 

Caroline 

Charles 

Cecil 

St. Mary 's. . . . 
Howard 



Baltimore City^ 
Total State 



89.; 



93.5 

.5 



88.9 



93.2 

96.1 
94.6 
94.1 
95.3 
92.4 
94.1 

92.1 
95.2 
91.6 
95.4 
91.9 
91.6 
93.9 
90.9 
91.9 
95.1 
88.1 
91.6 
89.6 
95.8 
87.2 



t92.7 
93.0 



For attendance in 1944, for counties arranged alphabetically see Table VIII, page 213. 
* Before 1940 all Baltimore County high school pupils attended schools in Baltimore City, 
t Includes Baltimore Coimty pupils who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense 
>of Baltimore County. 

° Includes pupils in vocational schools and ninth grade in junior high schools. 



18 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 1 



NUMBER OF BOYS AND GIRLS ENEOLLEDt BY GRADES 
IN MARYLAND COUNTY SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1944 



Total 

1943 Garade 
1944 



Total 
1943 
1944 



1944 



Boya 



COLORED 



Kgn. 




982 
1009 



$167251 
$174751 



533 
476 



WHITE 



3113 

tl.517| 2998 

^ 2759 

U366| 2847 

' 2679 
f 1.319 I 2477 



15056 


8,221 




15413 


ammmmmm 


'mmmmm\ 


14455 


7.649 




14671 


^mmmmmm 


mmmmmM 


14259 


7.4-20 




14415 




W//////////////////////M 


14465 


7,231 




14035 


wmmmmmm 


w////////////////////m 


14349 


7.225 




14185 






14328 


6,879 




13811 


nmmmmmm 






2.03 5 5184 
3,046 5083 

13.262 27452 
15.960 27222 





7185 




IV 


6825 




Total 


38394 


16,249 


High 


36778 


20.529 


Grand 


147765 


73.395 


Total 


146688 


73,293 



t Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death and commitment to institution. 
Includes pupils enrolled in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 

X Includes enrollment in junior first grade. 

Fourth year white high includes 10 boys and 14 girls in 1943 and 3 boys and 8 girla 
in 1944 who were post-graduates. 



Grade Enrollment Public Schools 



Grand 
Total 


cgcj IN r-< o (N as « iM o> eo eo t> ^ ;d 05 05 CO oc r-t 00 1-H CO 00 05 T)« o 


)OL Pupils in 


. Total 
High 


3,516 

1 2,555 
6,244 

261 

2 754 
. 1,686 

1,173 
584 

6 916 
. 2,338 
. 1,080 
1,506 
694 
1 464 
2,884 
1 3 , 808 
477 
402 
.1 540 
581 
2,459 
1,162 
713 

. 15,952 

; 4^532 
9,964 
1,456 

1 52,749 


111 




1 

f 


> 




• 5 


8,579 
8,065 

786 
596 
1,361 

54 
169 
386 
262 
130 
209 
509 
' 247 
314 
140 

99 
622 
816 
111 

98 
114 
142 
522 
205 
173 

3,065 

.... 

si 065 

11,130 


r 
1 


- K 


10.887 
9,764 

981 
678 

1,639 
68 
197 
437 
303 
158 
216 
612 
285 
402 
186 
122 
756 

1,010 
126 
104 
148 
149 
671 
330 
186 

3,962 

3; 962 
13,726 






12,543 
12,124 

1,102 
859 

2,159 
96 
234 
534 
399 
198 
237 
742 
321 
526 
223 
135 
938 

1,352 
156 
125 
176 
168 
844 
394 
206 

5,081 

41532 
549 

17,205 




Total 
Elemen- 
tary 


108,893 
*§109,435 

*10,751 
7,007 
*18,880 
755 
1,541 
4,278 
3,204 
1,638 
2,081 
5,969 
3,233 
4,247 
2,095 
1,032 
11,2.53 
12,598 
1,142 
862 
1,420 
1,343 
9,920 
*2,703 
1,483 

56,863 
45,132 
1,399 
10,332 

*§166,298 




i 


§5 |g : :^ : : : :§^|Sg | :| : : : | 

T-H,H r-( rH C<I 


1 


X 


ii i i :i - 1 : ;i i 


2 


t> 


§S ii52§lii^igHS§i2S2i§i3 i : ii : ; 1 


I 


«c 


14,263 
14,099 

1,181 
993 

2,466 
101 
241 
584 
413 
208 
307 
872 
412 
576 
254 
163 

1,223 

1,644 
154 
117 
214 
201 

1,195 
380 
200 

5,838 
5,838 

19,937 






14,378 
13,968 

1,189 
917 

2,503 
122 
204 
568 
408 
218 
276 
819 
458 
559 
296 
125 

1,236 

1,660 
153 
122 
194 
191 

1,176 
369 
205 

6,293 
6,293 

20,261 






14,186 
14,330 

1,204 
953 

2,558 
92 
188 
600 
415 
248 
276 
862 
420 
598 
267 
135 

1,284 

1,727 
165 
135 
209 
192 

1,228 
385 
189 

6,649 
6,649 

20,979 


UMBER OF White 


05 


14,370 
14,594 

1,265 
970 

2,741 
88 
217 
602 
461 
229 
267 
851 
478 
585 
283 
105 

1,299 

1,801 
168 
115 
186 
180 

1,135 
370 
198 

6,478 
6,478 

21,072 


(M 


14,977 
15,347 

1,405 
992 

2,877 
119 
220 
642 
455 
277 
301 
839 
475 
661 
295 
130 

1,390 

1,868 
176 
119 
205 
192 

1,160 
346 
203 

7,058 
7,058 

22,405 






16,432 
16,990 

1,400 
1,178 
3,267 
129 
243 
576 
567 
295 
322 
908 
615 
720 
292 
166 
1,605 
2,163 
181 
138 
194 
198 
1,229 
385 
219 

8,712 
8,712 

— 

25,702 




1- 








982 
1,009 

*"56 

■953 

°4,104 
°4,104 

°5,113 




County 


Total Counties, 

1943 

♦1944 

Allegany* 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore* 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

(iarrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Wicomico* 

Baltimore Cityf 

Elementary 

Occupational 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

Total State 



■ 19 



1HIN 



r 



i I 



ii 



20 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



i4 



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Colored Grade Enrollment; Elementary School 21 
Graduates and Non Promotions 



TABLE 16 

County White and Colored Elementary School Graduates and Non-Promotions 



Year 


Number 


fPERCENT 














Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 1 Total 



*°§CouNTY White Elementary School Graduates 



1923 


3,200 


4,136 


7,336 


6 


1 


8.5 


7.2 


1925 


3,705 


4,549 


8,254 


7 





9.4 


8.1 


1927 


4,290 


5,059 


9,349 


8 


1 


10.3 


9.1 


1929 


4,742 


5,186 


9,928 


8 


9 


10.4 


9.6 


1931 


4,757 


5,156 


9,913 


8 


7 


10.2 


9.4 


1933 


5,121 


5,653 


10,774 


9 


1 


10.9 


10.0 


1935 


5,190 


5,719 


10,909 


9 


3 


11.1 


10.1 


1937 


5,292 


5,703 


10,995 


9 


6 


11.2 


10.4 


1939 


5,845 


6,080 


11,925 


10 


6 


12.0 


11.3 


1941 


5,845 


6,423 


12,268 


10 


7 


12.6 


11.6 


1942 


5,921 


6,493 


12,414 


10 


7 


12.6 


11.6 


1943 


5,765 


6,367 


12,132 


10 


2 


12.2 


11.2 


1944 


5,779 


6,363 


12,142 


10 


2 


12.2 


11.2 



§CouNTY Colored Elementary School Graduates 



1923 


350 


637 


987 


2.3 


4.3 


3.3 


1925 


487 


705 


1,192 


3.4 


5.0 


4.2 


1927 


542 


909 


1,451 


4.0 


6.8 


5.4 


1929 


733 


1,077 


1,810 


5.5 


8.4 


6.9 


1931 


884 


1,101 


1,985 


6.7 


8.6 


7.6 


1933 


805 


1,105 


1,910 


6.1 


8.6 


7.4 


1935 


874 


1,190 


2,064 


6.9 


9.7 


8.2 


1937 


793 


1,130 


1,923 


6.5 


9.7 


8.1 


1939 


909 


1,100 


2,009 


7.6 


9.6 


8.6 


1941 


881 


1,134 


2,015 


7.5 


10.2 


8.8 


1942 


919 


1,115 


2,034 


8.0 


10.0 


9.0 


1943 


920 


1,223 


2,143 


8.1 


11.2 


9.6 


1944 


831 


1,078 


1,909 


7.5 


9.9 


8.6 


*tCouNTY White Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 


1923 


13,435 


8,586 


22,021 


25.6 


17.5 


21.7 


1925 


10,673 


6,336 


17,009 


20.2 


13.0 


16.8 


1927 


9,954 


6,134 


16,088 


18.7 


12.4 


15.6 


1929 


9,147 


5,609 


14,756 


17.1 


11.3 


14.3 


1931 


9,231 


5,293 


14,524 


16.8 


10.4 


13.7 


1933 


10,503 


6,244 


16,747 


18.6 


12.0 


15.4 


1935 


9,283 


5,447 


14,730 


16.5 


10.5 


13.6 


1937 


9,200 


5,390 


14,590 


16.6 


10.5 


13.7 


1939 


7,571 


4,198 


11,769 


13.7 


8.2 


11.1 


1941 


6,949 


3,736 


10,685 


12.7 


7.3 


10.1 


1942 


6,753 


3,534 


10,287 


12.2 


6.9 


9.6 


1943 


7,404 


3,851 


11,255 


13.1 


7.4 


10.3 


1944 


6,854 


3,731 


10,585 


12.1 


7.1 


9.7 



JCouNTY Colored Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



1923 


5,722 


4,616 


10,338 


38 
33 


3 


31 


1 


34 
29 


7 


1925 


4,800 


3,700 


8,500 


2 


26 


3 


8 


1927 


4,015 


3,091 


7,106 


29 


5 


23 


3 


26 


4 


1929 


3,230 


2,361 


5,591 


24 


2 


18 


5 


21 


4 


1931 


2,929 


2,022 


4,951 


22 


4 


15 


8 


19 


1 


1933 


3,041 


2,230 


5,271 


23 


2 


17 


4 


20 


3 


1935 


2,848 


1,959 


4,807 


22 


4 


15 


9 


19 


2 


1937 


2,601 


1,753 


4,354 


21 


5 


15 





18 


3 


1939 


2,604 


1,705 


4,309 


21 


7 


14 


9 


18 


4 


1941 


2,196 


1,467 


3,663 


18 


9 


13 


2 


16 


1 


1942 


2,292 


1,353 


3,645 


20 





12 


3 


16 


2 


1943 


2,451 


- 1,440 


3,891 


21 


7 


13 


2 


17 


6 


1944 


2,316 


1,472 


3,788 


20 


.7 


13 


6 


17 


1 



t Percent of total elementary enrollment, exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, com- 
mitment, and death, who graduated or were not promoted. 

* Includes seventh or eighth grade promotions in junior high schools as graduates and seventh 
or seventh and eighth grade non-promotions in junior high schools as non-promotions. 

° In obtaining percentages, kindergarten enrollment is excluded. 

§ In obtaining percentages, enrollment in elementary school(s) of State teachers college(s) is 
included. 

t Etu-oUment in elementary school(s) of State teachers college(s) is excluded, but kindergarten 
is included. 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 2 



PERCENT OF GRADUATES IN 1944 
COUNTY WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT* 



County 




Prince George •s"'^^ 



Somerset 

Anne Arundel 

Wicomicot 

Harford 

Carroll 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Howard 

Washington** 

Allegany*tt 

Baltimoret 

Montgomery* 

Charles 



79 
410 
153 
237 
262 

67 

68 
194 
127 
478 
459 
878 
466 

77 



6,363 
165 
421 

58 

67 
117 
218 
101 

58 
772 

95 

447 

184 iiaT 
275 
248 

69 

83 
166 
102 

545 Lli.i 
614 

990 tio 
495 
73 



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° Enrollment in Kindergarten (s) excluded in obtaining percentage. 

% Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 6-5 plan, and from grade 8 in counties 
having 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization. 

t Enrollment in elementary school of State teachers college included. 

* County has 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization. 



Percent of Graduates in 1944 Elementary School Enrollment 23 



CHART 3 



PERCENT OF GRADUATES IN 1944 COUNTY COLORED 
ELESiENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENTt 



County 

Total and 
Co. Averaget 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Frederick 

Queen Anne's 

Howard 

Harford 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Kent 

Talbot 

Somerset 

Dorchester 

Weshln^on*^ 

Calvert 

Charles 

Montgomery* 

Anne Arundelf 

Prince George 'et 

Baltimore 

Allegany*^ 



Number 
Boys Girls 



831 

40 
14 

31 
30 
33 
40 
46 
42 
£0 
28 
29 
39 
45 
45 
10 
36 
55 
63 
84 
76 
21 



9.9 



Percent 
Boys 



Percent 
Girls 



v/mm/m//m///////////m///////////M^ 



v////////////////////////////////////m^^ 

2o rTs.9^ 

51 

2a 

544 \z.n v////////////////////// /////////////^^^^^ 
471 




7////////////y//////////////^/m^ 



ms^^///////////////////////^^^^ 



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se T 9.2^ 

60l 

8 1 7-7: 

54 ^^^^^^^^^^^> ^>y/« 
77 ro^^^lPlB ^^//////y//a 

144 





t Includes pupils in elementary school of State teachers college at Bowie. 

County has twelve year program, 6-6 in Allegany and Washington, and 7-5 in 
Montgomery. 

• 1 J E'^^^l^^^es withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 7-4 plan and from grade 8 in counties 
having twelve year program. 



24, 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 4 



AND 

County 

Total and 
Co. Average 

Frederick 

Washington 

Prince George's 

Montgomery 

Carroll 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Ga rrett 

Kent 

Charles 

Cecil 

Calvert 

Harford 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Howard 

Somerset 

Anne Arundel 

Allegany 

Wicomico 

St. Mary's 

Queen Ajine's 

Baltimore 



NOMBER AND PERCENT OF COUNTY WHITE ELEMENTAET 
JUNIOR HIGH PUPILS THROUGH GRADE 8 NOT PROMOTED. 



Number 
Boys Girls 



6,854 

88 
221 
558 
560 
243 

74 

85 
191 

65 
112 
207 

53 
284 
108 
152 
166 
110 
499 
816 
247 

76 
111 
1,828 



Percent Boys 



1944 

Percent Girls 




160 
58 
79 
72 
53 
289 
399 
123 
42 
51 
1,167 







14.2 - - .... -i..'— 



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^^tr///////////////////////////^^^^ 



* Includes pupils in kindergartens and special classes considered not ready for advance- 
ment. 

Pupils in elementary schools of teachers colleges in Allegany, Baltimore and Wicomico 
Counties are excluded. 



Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



25 



CHART 5 



NUMBER AND PERCENT OF COUNTY COLORED ELEMENTAET PUPILS 
NOT PROMOTED - 1944 



County 

Total and 
Co. Average 

Queen Anne's 

Caroline 

Washington 

Frederick 

Cecil 

Kent 

Dorchester 

Wl coal CO 

Talbot 

Montgomery 

Howard 

Allegany 

Charles 

Somerset 

Harford 

Carroll 

Worcester 

St. Mary's 



Calvert 
Pr. George's* ^^"^ 
Baltimore 



Number 
Boys Girls 



Percent. Boys 



Percent Girls 



,316 




1,472 


9 






6 


26 






17 








6 


29 






27 


24 




10 


38 






22 


85 






30 


82 


50 


54 






46 


148 






80 


45 


32 


14 






9 


111 






82 


94 






59 


67 






42 


19 




17 


115 






67 


70 


48 


319 






203 


141 




82 



397 



20.7 

matsr///////////////////////: 




BE] 



7 V/////////////////////7/A 



'//////////mm/M/A 



V/////////////////////////M 



260 
277 



EBB 



- 40.3 

WSE3r//////////////////////////////////////^^^^ I 



* Excludes pupils in elementary school of State Teachers College at Bowie, 



26 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

CHART 6 



NON-PROMOTIONS* BY GRADES IN COUNTY ELEMENTARY AND 
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS THROUGH GRADE 8 FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1944 




The above percentages on the bars for white and colored should be reversed. 



TABLE 17 — Number and Percent of Non-Promotions in First Grade* 
in Maryland County White and Colored Schools, 1944 



County 



White Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 



Number 



Boys 



Girls 



Percent 



Boys 



Girls 



County 



Colored Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 



Number 



Boys 



Girls 



Percent 



Total Counties: 

1942 

1943 

1944 

Frederick 

Washington .... 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Howard 

Allegany 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Prince George's 
Dorchester. . . . 
Montgomery . . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Worcester 

Kent 

Anne Arundel . . 

Charles 

Wicomico 

Baltimore 

Harford 

Queen Anne's. . 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Cecil 



1,591 
1,739 
1,592 

39 
43 
30 
16 
26 

110 
13 
49 

193 
31 

162 
10 
27 
16 

129 
38 
48 

382 
81 
27 
20 
23 
79 



935 
965 
980 

14 

32 
20 
12 
10 
74 
14 
36 

116 
16 
90 
12 
8 
11 
80 
16 
24 

244 
62 
9 
19 
5 
56 



18.9 
19.7 
17.5 

7.9 
7.1 
10.3 
12.4 
16.5 
15.2 
13.1 
14.2 
16.5 
16.8 
18.2 
14.5 
24.8 
18.2 
21.0 
23.0 
23.0 
21.6 
21.7 
27.3 
19.6 
30.3 
25.2 



12.7 
12.7 
12.4 

3.4 
5.1 
7.0 
10.5 
7.5 
10.9 
14.1 
13.3 
11.7 
11.6 
12.6 
17.4 
7.3 
14.1 
14.2 
12.3 
13.6 
16.3 
17.9 
11.0 
20.7 
9.4 
22.0 



Total Counties 

1942 

1943 

1944 

Queen Anne's . 

Frederick 

Washington . . . 

Allegany 

Dorchester. . . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Talbot 

Montgomery . . 

Charles 

Wicomico. ... 

Howard 

Prince George's 
Worcester. ... 

Kent 

Anne Arundel . 

Somerset 

Harford 

St. Mary's. . . . 

Calvert 

Cecil 

Baltimore 



536 
573 
568 



334 
380 
389 

3 
5 

1 

3 
7 
2 
14 
20 
25 
17 
8 
54 
13 
8 
58 
24 
16 
17 
24 
8 
62 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



NoN Promotions by Grade in First Grade, and by Cause for 
White Elementary School Pupils 



TABLE 18 



Causes for Non-Promotion of County White Elementary Pupils Not Pro- 
moted by Year, 1930 to 1944, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1944 



year 

COUNT. Y 


Total 
Not 
Promoted 






Percent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 






All Causes 


Unfortunate Home 
Conditions and 
Lack of Interest 


Mental Incapacity 


Personal Illness 


Irregular At- 
tendance Not 
Due to Sickness 


Transfer from 
Another School 


tl4 Years or Over, 
Employed 


Late Entrance and 
Early Withdrawal 


Other Causes 










By 


Year 




















1930 


14,311 


13 


8 


4 


5 


2. 


7 


1 


7 


1 


5 


.8 


1.0 


.3 


1 


3 


1931 


14,505 


13 


8 


4 


8 


2. 


7 


1 


6 


1 


2 


.8 


.8 


.3 


1 


6 


1932 


15,251 


14 


3 


5 


4 


2. 


7 


1 


8 


1 


2 


.8 


.7 


.3 


1 


4 


1933 


16,727 


15 


5 


5 


8 


3. 


1 


1 


5 


1 


3 


.8 


.7 


.2 


2 


1 


1934 


17|818 


16 


6 


5 


8 


3. 


3 


2 


4 


1 


5 


.9 


.6 


.2 


1 


9 


1935 


14,709 


13 


7 


4 


7 


2. 


5 


1 


9 


1 


3 


.7 


.8 


.1 


1 


7 


1936 . . . 


14,751 


13 


8 


4 


9 


2. 


3 


1 


7 


1 


4 


.7 


.8 


.1 




9 


1937 


14,575 


13 


7 


5 





2. 


1 


1 


8 


1 


3 


.8 


.9 


.1 


1 


7 


1938 


12,520 


11 


9 


4 


5 


1. 


8 


1 


4 


1 





.7 


.7 


.3 


1 


5 


1939 


11,759 


11 


1 


4 


6 


1. 


6 


1 


2 




9 


.7 


.5 


.2 


1 


4 


1940 


11,057 


10 


5 


4 


2 


1. 


6 








9 


.7 


. 5 


.2 


1 


3 


1941* 


10,685 


10 


1 


3 


8 


1 


3 


1 




1 





.6 


.6 


.2 


1 


5 


1942* 


10^287 


9 


6 


3 


7 


1 


1 


1 




1 





.6 


.6 


.2 


1 


3 


1943* 


11,255 


10 


3 


3 


9 


1 


1 


1 




1 


3 


.6 


.6 


.2 


1 


5 


1944* 


10,585 


9 


8 


4 





1 





1 




1 





. 5 


.5 


.2 


1 


5 








By County, 


1944 




















125 


2 


1 


1 


3 




2 




4 






.1 





.1 






"Washington 


361 


3 


6 


1 


4 




4 




3 




5 


.1 


.7 







2 


Prince George's 


885 


7 





3 





1. 


1 


1 







4 


.6 


.1 


.3 




5 




812 


7 


9 


2 


4 




7 


1 


1 




9 


.3 


. 5 


.2 


1 


8 


Carroll 


342 


8 





2 


7 


2 


6 




6 




5 


.6 


.6 


.1 




3 


Talbot 


117 


8 


7 


4 


4 


1 





1 


3 




9 


.4 


.5 


.1 




1 




132 


8 


9 


3 


9 


1 


3 


1 


8 




1 


.4 


.7 






7 




151 


9 


2 


1 


8 




8 


1 


5 


1 


1 


1.0 


.7 


".2 


2 


1 


Garrett 


297 


9 


2 


3 


6 


1 


3 


2 







8 


.3 


.3 


.2 




7 


Kent 


95 


9 


2 


4 


1 




6 


1 


2 




2 


1.0 


.3 


.2 


1 


6 


CecU 


305 


9 


5 


3 


5 


1 


3 


1 


3 


1 


4 


.4 


.3 


.2 


1 


1 


Calvert. . 


73 


9 


7 


3 


9 


1 


2 




9 




5 


.1 


.8 


.7 


1 


6 


Harford 


444 


10 


5 


4 


8 




5 


1 


5 


1 


6 


.6 


.4 





1 


1 


Caroline 


166 


10 


8 


4 





1 


4 


1 


2 




9 


.4 




.1 


2 


8 




231 


11 


.1 


5 


9 


1 


6 




7 




6 


.6 


.6 


.1 


1 







788 


11 


.2 


5 





1 


1 


1 


3 




5 


.8 


.2 


.2 


1 






1,215 


11 


.3 


3 


4 


2 


3 




7 


1 


9 


.3 


.6 


.1 


2 





Howard 


138 


11 


.4 


5 


4 


1 


5 




.7 


1 


6 


.5 


.7 


.5 




5 




163 


11 


.5 


4 


8 


2 


5 


1 


1 




8 


.3 


.1 


.4 


1 


5 


St. Mary's 


118 


13 


.7 


4 


5 




2 




4 


1 


9 


1.4 


.7 


.4 


3 


2 




370- 


13 


.7 


4 


5 


2 


3 


2 


.7 




3 


.7 


1.4 


.1 


1 


7 


Queen Anne 's 


162 


14 


.2 


9 


9 




2 




7 




5 


.7 


.2 




1 





Baltimore* 


2,997 


15 


.9 


7 







1 


1 


7 


1 


7 


.9 


.7 


.3 


3 


5 



13 years, 1930 to 1931, inclusive. 

Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



28 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 19 

Causes for Non-Promotion of County Colored Elementary Pupils by Year, 
1930-1944, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1944 



♦Total 
Not 
Promoted 



Percent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



Home 
and 
Interest 






tendance 


Over, 




(D 
W 


^ ° o 








cd 




itrar 


Unfortur 
Conditi 
Lack . 


Mental 
Incapac 


Personal 
Illness 


Irregular 
Not Di 
Sickness 


14 Years 
Employ 


Transfer 
Anothei 


Late Er 



By Year 



1930 


5,643 


21.1 


7.0 


1.7 


2.6 


5.1 


tl.6 


.7 


.9 


.5 


1931 


4,932 


18.5 


5.8 


1.8 


2.4 


4.4 


n.4 


.5 


1.0 


1.2 


1932 


4,952 


18.7 


6.6 


1.7 


2.4 


4.3 


1.2 


.3 


.8 


1.4 


1933 


5,266 


19.8 


7.8 


1.8 


1.8 


4.4 


1.1 


.4 


.8 


1.7 


1934 


5,310 


20.8 


7.3 


1.7 


2.2 


6.2 


1.2 


.5 


.5 


1.2 


1935 


4,797 


19.2 


6.4 


1.9 


2.1 


5.0 


1.3 


.5 


.5 


1.5 


1936 


4,660 


19.1 


6.7 


1.4 


2.0 


5.3 


1.3 


.6 


.5 


1.3 


1937 


4,350 


18.3 


6.6 


1.4 


2.4 


4.4 


1.3 


.5 


.4 


1.3 


1938 


4,484 


19.2 


7.9 


1.3 


1.7 


4.0 


1.2 


,7 


.7 


1.7 


1939 


4,303 


18.5 


8:5 


1.4 


1.6 


3.7 


.9 


.5 


.6 


1.3 


1940 


4,832 


16.6 


7.7 


.9 


1.5 


3.2 


1.0 


.8 


.6 


.9 


1941 


3,663 


16.1 


7.0 


.9 


1.8 


3.0 


1.0 


.7 


.5 


1.2 


1942 


3,645 


16.2 


7.5 


.9 


1.4 


3.1 


.9 


.6 


.4 


1.4 


1943 


3,891 


17.6 


7.5 


.9 


1.5 


4.4 


1.0 


.5 


.3 


1.5 


1944 


3,788 


17.2 


7.3 


.9 


1.7 


4.2 


.8 


.7 


.5 


1.1 



By Ccunty, 1944 



Queen Anne's 


15 


3.2 


1.5 




1.3 


.2 










2 




43 


8.1 


.6 




2.4 


1.7 


I'.S 




.6 


1 


5 


Washington 


18 


8.5 


4.2 




.5 


3.3 




.5 








Frederick 


56 


8.8 


5.5 


.5 


1.1 


1.1 


.5 


.1 








Cecil 


34 


10.5 


1.6 




.9 


7.7 










3 


Kent 


60 


10.5 


6.5 


.2 


.9 


.4 


1.6 


!3 


'.'5 




7 


Dorchester 


115 


11.4 


5.7 


.6 


.7 


1.1 


.3 


.5 


.2 


2 


3 


Wicomico 


132 


12.4 


4.7 


2.4 


2.5 


.7 


.5 


.1 


.8 




7 


Talbot 


100 


13.2 


7.4 


1.3 


.3 


3.6 


.4 


.1 


.1 






Montgomery 


228 


13.5 


4.8 


.8 


2.0 


3.3 


1.0 


.5 


.5 




6 


Howard 


77 


13.6 


6.2 


.5 


.2 


4.9 


.4 


.5 


.5 




4 


Allegany 


23 


13.6 


8.9 




2.3 


1.2 








1 


2 


Charles 


193 


14.0 


4.0 


.7 


.8 


6.8 


.5 


'.i 


A 




4 


Somerset 


153 


14.0 


4.5 


1.0 


1.4 


3.9 


2.1 


.3 


.7 




1 


Harford 


109 


14.7 


7.5 




1.9 


3.4 






1.1 




8 




36 


14.8 


3.7 


2:5 


1.2 


5.8 


'.8 


.4 


.4 








182 


17.3 


9.4 


1.8 


1.5 


.5 


2.0 


.6 


.4 


1 


i 


St, Mary's 


118 


17.9 


4.7 


.2 


2.1 


8.0 


.3 


.6 


.5 


1 


5 


Anne Arundel* 


522 


18.2 


8.2 


1.0 


2.4 


4.3 


.4 


.6 


.2 


1 


1 


Calvert 


223 


21.1 


4.9 


1.7 


1.5 


9.7 


1.7 


.4 


.6 




6 


Prince George's*. . . . 


677 


22.9 


10. 1 


1.1 


2.5 


3.8 


.9 


1.8 


.7 


2 





Baltimore 


674 


33.9 


16.7 


.4 


1.9 


9.2 


1.1 


1.6 


.4 


2 


6 



t Thirteen years or over, employed. 

* Excludes pupils at elementary school, Bowie State Teachers College. 



Causes of Colored Elementary School Non Promotions; 
Age-Grade, Boys 



29 



TABLE 20 



AgeJ-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Boys Enrolled Nov. 1943 



JAGE 


GRADE§ 


YEAR 




























1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


I 


II 


III 


IV 



Maryland County White Boys 



*5 and under 


2,182 


1 






















°6 


5,439 


1,453 


3 




















7 


1,485 


4,334 


1,189 


7 


















8 


273 


1,842 


3,759 


1,124 


9 
















9 


82 


473 


1,795 


3,229 


978 


14 














10: 


31 


108 


708 


1,898 


3,085 


925 


23 












11 


20 


43 


220 


817 


1,884 


2,961 


883 


8 


19 








12 


13 


17 


56 


313 


896 


1,898 


2,771 


282 


593 


11 






13 


7 


19 


25 


90 


342 


1,042 


1,881 


784 


2,086 


495 


4 




14 . . 


6 


14 


17 


28 


95 


380 


986 


397 


1,898 


1,639 


420 


7 


15 


3 


3 


7 


9 


22 


75 


325 


194 


898 


1,500 


1,437 


398 


16 








1 


3 


9 


27 


21 


194 


497 


1,091 


1,201 


17 










1 




2 


3 


19 


90 


325 


t796 


18 
















1 


2 


4 


23 


93 


19 






















2 


16 


19 + 






















1 


5 




9,541 


8,307 


7,779 


7,516 


7,315 


7,304 


6,898 


1,690 


5,709 


4,236 


3,303 


t2,516 


Number overage . . . 


435 


677 


1,033 


1,258 


1,359 


1,506 


1,340 


219 


811 


411 


223 


70 


Percent overage. . . . 


4.6 


8.1 


13.3 


16.6 


18.6 


20.6 


19.4 


13.0 


14.2 


9.7 


6.8 


2.8 



Maryland County Colored Boys 





302 


1 






















6 


1,080 


182 


6 




















7 


426 


743 


148 


5 


















8 


122 


477 


621 


136 


4 


1 














9 


35 


202 


439 


595 


145 


2 














10 


21 


100 


213 


428 


465 


127 


7 












11 


7 


26 


110 


284 


390 


455 


122 


2 


4 








12 


4 


14 


43 


148 


250 


415 


361 


13 


87 


5 






13 




4 


20 


87 


159 


245 


362 


31 


285 


73 


8 




14 


i 


3 


9 


34 


64 


111 


198 


27 


254 


224 


59 


5 


15 








7 


11 


37 


82 


12 


127 


142 


155 


55 


16 








1 


2 


9 


17 


3 


39 


76 


106 


118 


17 










1 


1 


5 




7 


15 


38 


94 


18 


















2 




6 


15 


19 
























3 


19+ 
























1 


Total number 


1,998 


1,752 


1,609 


1,725 


1,491 


1,403 


1,154 


88 


805 


535 


372 


291 


Number overage . . . 


190 


349 


395 


561 


487 


403 


302 


15 


161 


78 


37 


18 


Percent overage .... 


9.5 


19.9 


24.5 


32.5 


32.7 


28.7 


26.2 


17.0 


20.0 


14.6 


9.9 


6.2 



t Age for last birthday as of September, 1943. 
* Excludes 506 in Kindergarten. 
° Excludes 26 in Kindergarten. 

§ Includes pupils in special classes according to grade reported, but excludes pupils in elementary 
schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Includes one post-graduate. 



30 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 21 



Age Grade Distribution of Maryland County Girls Enrolled Nov. 1943 



$age 


grade§ 


YEAR 




























1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


I 


II 


III 


IV 



Maryland County White Girls 



*5 and under 


2,098 




1 




















°6 


4,937 


1,501 


3 




















7 


928 


4,315 


1,451 


5 


















8 


148 


1,107 


3,932 


1,461 


9 
















9 


40 


265 


1,216 


3,675 


1,263 


14 














JO 


15 


65 


362 


1,252 


3,515 


1,424 


32 




1 








11 


8 


14 


91 


448 


1,388 


3,435 


1,324 


14 


. .14 








12 


5 


5 


25 


130 


524 


1,373 


3,405 


415 


858 


14 






13 


6 


3 


9 


28 


148 


565 


1,450 


875 


2,717 


811 


28 




14 


2 


1 


7 


3 


48 


164 


567 


374 


1,903 


2,324 


718 


10 


15 


1 






4 


5 


37 


153 


113 


620 


1,647 


2,153 


675 


J6 






' 1 


1 


3 


3 


12 


18 


136 


435 


1,298 


t2,077 


n 
















1 


4 


65 


281 


•11,078 


18 














1 






5 


43 


244 


19 


















" 1 


1 


11 


35 


19+ 




















1 




t 


Total number 


8,188 


7,276 


7,098 


7,007 


6,903 


7,015 


6,944 


1,810 


6,254 


5,303 


4,532 


114,120 


Number over age. . . 


225 


353 


495 


614 


728 


769 


733 


132 


514 


342 


208 


105 


Percent over age . . . 


2.7 


4.9 


7.0 


8.8 


10.5 


11.0 


10.6 


7.3 


8.2 


6.4 


4.6 


2.6 



Maryland County Colored Girls 



5 and under 


314 

1,075 


























241 


11 






















293 


781 


222 


3 




















84 


316 


760 


195 


6 


















28 


110 


357 


689 


243 


14 
















7 


48 


142 


342 


617 


203 


18 














1 


17 

8 


43 


162 


374 


592 


203 




11 










3 


26 


72 


160 


384 


464 


22 


182 


14 










3 


11 


33 


85 


175 


389 


33 


439 


155 


6 






1 


2 


6 


20 


35 


86 


169 


37 


322 


308 


120 


4 




1 


1 


4 


11 

3 


25 


54 


8 


148 


222 


282 


103 








1 


4 


3 


9 


2 


30 


70 


150 


221 












2 


1 




8 


11 


52 


110 
















1 




2 


2 


10 


37 






















2 


2 


7 


19+ 




















1 


1 






1,806 


1,527 


1,580 


1,524 


1,534 


1,484 


1,308 


102 


1,142 


785 


623 


482 


Number overage .... 
Percent overage .... 


124 
6.7 


189 
12.4 


230 
14.6 


295 
19.4 


294 
19.2 


291 
19.6 


234 
17.9 


10 
9.8 


161 
14.1 


71 
9.0 


69 
11.1 


86 
7.5 



J Age for last birthday as of September, 1943. § Includes pupils in special classes accord- 

* Excludes 465 in kindergarten. ing to grade reported, but excludes pupils in et** 

° Excludes 29 in kindergarten. roentary schools of teachers colleges, 

t Includes 2 post-graduates. 1 Includes 3 post-graduates. 



Age-Grade, Girls; Over Age Elementary Pupils 



31 



Table 22 — Number and Percent of Maryland White Elementary Pupils t 
Over-Age Nov. 1921, 1941 and 1943 



Number Over Age 
1943 



Percent of White Elementary Pupils Over Age 



County 




1921 


1941 


1943 


1943 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


County Average 


7,827 


4,049 


31 


6 


12 


5 


10.9 


13 


9 


7.8 


Allegany 


*838 


*351 


*27 


9 


*12 


7 


♦11.1 


♦15 


1 


*6.8 


Anne Arundel . . . 


537 


252 


*27 


1 


10 


9 


11.2 


14 


8 


7.4 


Baltimore 


1,818 


1,056 


28 


9 


15 


5 


15.2 


18 


7 


11.6 


Calvert 


62 


31 


38 


8 


13 


3 


12.4 


16 


1 


8 . 6 


Caroline 


48 


31 


33 


2 


4 





5.1 


5 


9 


4.1 


Carroll 


345 


115 


33 


8 


15 


3 


10.8 


15 


3 


5.8 


Cecil 


289 


145 


35 


6 


13 





13.6 


17 


5 


9.4 


Charles 


187 


91 


35 





19 


1 


16.9 


20 


7 


12.3 




144 


69 


29 


1 


12 


6 


10 4 


13 


5 


7.0 


Frederick 


244 


106 


35 


7 


7 


8 


5^9 


8 





3.7 


Garrett 


377 


182 


46 


5 


16 


8 


17.0 


21 


7 


11.7 


Harford 


372 


204 


33 


5 


13 


7 


13.1 


16 


3 


9.6 


Howard 


291 


168 


39 


6 


20 


5 


21.3 


24 


9 


17.0 


Kent 


67 


29 


27 


9 


9 


9 


9.6 


12 


6 


6.2 


Montgomery .... 


*414 


*225 


33 


4 


*6 


6 


*6.2 


*7 


7 


*4.5 


Prince George's. 


691 


362 


27 


6 


11 


8 


8.4 


10 


4 


6.2 


Queen Anne's. . . 


73 


46 


27 


1 


11 


2 


10.3 


12 





8.4 


St. Mary's 


75 


47 


43 


6 


16 


7 


13.4 


15 


8 


10.8 


Somerset 


122 


60 


31 


7 


12 


9 


12.9 


15 


9 


9.3 


Talbot 


94 


66 


30 





11 


5 


12.0 


14 


2 


9.8 


Washington .... 


*418 


*241 


*28.2 


*12 


7 


*6.7 


*8 


3 


*4.9 


Wicomico 


232 


117 


26 


9 


16 


8 


13.1 


17 


2 


8.9 


Worcester 


88 


55 


28 


1 


9 


9 


9.8 


12 


5 


7.3 


7 Grade Systems 


6,148 


3,226 


32 


5 


13 


3 


12.1 


15 


2 


8.7 


*8 Grade Systems 


1,679 


823 


27 


9 


10 


8 


8.0 


10 


5 


5.5 



* Includes the three counties with an asterisk and one school in Prince George's County. 



Table 23 — Number and Percent of Maryland County Colored Elementary 
Pupils t Over-Age Nov. 1921,1941 and 1943 



County 


Number Over Age 
1943 


Percent of Colored Elementary Pupils Over Age 


1921 


1941 


1943 


1943 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


County Average 


2,702 


1,667 


65.6 


20 


7 


19 


8 


24 


1 


15.3 


Allegany 


*18 


*6 


56.2 


*26 


4 


*13 


8 


*18 


9 


*7.4 


Anne Arundel . . . 


489 


311 


69.0 


31 





27 


9 


32 
36 


7 


22.7 




357 


216 


57.1 


30 


8 


28 


8 


1 


21.6 


Calvert 


181 


109 


7^.3 


30 


5 


27 


8 


34 


2 


21.2 


Caroline 


42 


23 


73.1 


13 


6 


12 


1 


14 


4 


9.5 


Carroll 


16 


20 


72.6 


11 


9 


15 


1 


14 

8 





16.1 


Cecil 


14 


10 


59.2 


10 


7 


7 


5 


1 


6.7 


Charles 


94 


73 


62.6 


21 


5 


12 


3 


14 


2 


10.5 


Dorchester 


79 


29 


64.7 


12 


7 


10 


6 


15 





5.9 


Frederick 


25 


17 


59.5 


10 





6 


4 


7 


6 


5.7 


Harford 


80 


32 


64.4 


18 


3 


15 


3 


21 


5 


8.8 


Howard 


61 


39 


71.2 


17 


4 


17 


8 


20 


8 


14.6 


Kent 


64 


38 


68.9 


15 


6 


18 





23 


1 


13.1 


Montgomery 


*154 


*90 


66.2 


14 


1 


*14 


5 


*18 


1 


*10.8 


Prince George's. 


517 


296 


64.1 


25 


9 


27 


4 


33 


9 


20.5 


Queen Anne's . . . 


22 


21 


68.6 


10 


4 


8 


5 


8 


8 


8.2 


St. Mary's 


91 


69 


74.5 


22 


7 


23 


9 


27 


2 


20.7 


Somerset. : 


117 


77 


71.0 


17 


9 


17 


5 


20 


3 


14.5 


Talbot 


69 


60 


66.8 


12 


6 


16 


9 


18 


5 


15.4 


Washington 


no 


*8 


52.8 


*9 


5 


*8 


7 


*9 


3 


*8.1 


Wicomico 


122 


74 


58.4 


15 


3 


18 


4 


23 


6 


13.5 


Worcester 


80 


49 


63.4 


12.8 


12 


3 


15 


1 


9.5 



t Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. * 8 elementary grades. 



32 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 24— Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children 
in Maryland Financed with State Funds in 1943-44 



County 



Home Teaching 



Pupils 



Teach- 
ers 



Expendi 
tures 



Transportation 
to Regular Class 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Special 
Instruction 
in Hospital 

Schools 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Total 



Pupils 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Pr. George's. . . 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City . 

Total State 



14 



50 
136 



$5,435.63 

591.15 
226.60 
1,257.04 



219.58 
237.90 
282.44 
146.26 
183.02 
229.96 
152.26 



12.10 
229.71 
568.88 
413.78 



251.44 
400.51 
33.00 

3,000.00 

$8,435.63 



$1,935.35 
1,336.00 



104.30 
'45.66 



86.50 



140.00 
73.50 



84.00 
66.05 



1,600.00 
$3,535.35 



125 

ab7 
blO 
ab9 
b2 
b3 
blO 
ab5 
b2 
b2 
bl2 
ab5 
b4 
b4 
b2 
ablO 
b5 
b2 
bl 
b7 
b3 
b6 
blO 
b4 

148 

273 



$1,200.00 



al,200.00 



b5,400.00 
$6,600.00 



240 


$8,570.98 


37 


1 927.15 


1 R 
ID 




23 


2,457.04 


2 


6 


219.58 


13 


237.90 


10 


282.44 


4 


146.26 


4 


183.02 


16 


334.26 


8 


152.26 


5 


45.00 


5 


12.10 


4 


229.71 


21 


568.88 


15 


500.28 


2 




3 


140.00 


8 


73.50 


3 




11 


335.44 


19 


466.56 


5 


33.00 


212 


10,000.00 




c 


452 


$18,570.98 



a Expenditures for teaching 6 children at the Rehabilitation Institute, Reisterstown, include one 
child each from Baltimore, Cecil, Garrett, and Montgomery Counties, and two from Allegany, the 
children being shown opposite the individual county. 

b The two teachers for whom reimbursement of $5,400.00 was paid instructed 148 Baltimore 
City and 119 county children under treatment in the hospital schools, who are shown opposite the 
individual county and Baltimore City. 

c The rem»\t>der of the $20,534.53 State expenditure was spent for testing hard-of-hearing chil- 
dren in county schools ($639.41), therapeutic aids and other services for children in county schools 
($796.05), publication of bulletins ($327.07), and supplies and equipment ($201.02). 



Aid for the Physically Handicapped 

As part of the program of aid to handicapped children the 
State Department of Education and the State School for the Deaf 
have for five years conducted a j^ontinuous audiometer testing 
program in the Maryland county public schools to detect the 
children v^ith impaired hearing. In June 1943 the State Depart- 
ment of Education published a ten-page bulletin entitled Corir- 
servation of Hearing Program for Maryland County Schools to 
give practical help to teacher, parents and child. 

This was supplemented in February 1944 by a four-page 
pamphlet entitled The Prevention of Deafness, v^hich was made 
available to all the counties as a result of cooperation by the 
State Departments of Health and Education with the Baltimore 



Physically and Mentally Handicapped Children 33 



League for the Hard of Hearing. The bulletin is for use with 
children who have a potential hearing loss and their parents, and 
in classes where children are studying sound, hearing, and 
health problems. 



TABLE 25 

Special Classes for Retarded Children in Counties, 1943-1944 





White 


Colored 


County 






Average 






Average 




Number 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 


Number 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 




of 


ment 


ment Per 


of 


ment 


ment Per 




Classes 




Class 


Classes 




Class 


Total 1940-41 


61 


1,275 


20.9 


3 


75 


25.0 


1941-42 


63 


1,345 


21.3 


3 


71 


23.7 


1942-43 


60 


1,358 


22.6 


2 


51 


25.5 


1943-44 


64 


1,457 


22.7 


3 


51 


17.0 




*16 


373 


23.3 


1 


5 


5.0 


Anne Arundel 


3 


68 


22.7 








Caroline 


1 


18 


18.0 








Carroll 


t3 


58 


19.3 








CecU 


2 


42 


21.0 










1 


17 


17.0 








Howard 


2 


37 


18.5 








Kent 


t3 


67 


22.3 








Montgomery 


1 


29 


29.0 










3 


56 


18.7 










i 


20 


20.0 








Talbot 


2 


30 


15.0 








Washington 


°19 


488 


25.7 










4 


95 


23.8 


"\2 


' 46 


23.6 




3 


59 


19.3 







* Six of these are in one school, 
t One school had two classes. 

° Three elementary and two junior high schools each had two classes, and one junior high school 
had three classes. 



The Baltimore City Program for the Handicapped 

Baltimore City had 5 white and 2 colored teachers who gave 
home instruction to 122 white boys and 158 white girls and to 43 
colored boys and 21 colored girls too physically handicapped to 
attend school. Training in lip reading was given to 211 white 
and 53 colored City pupils in the regular grades in addition to 
those who were in hearing conservation classes. There were 
648 white and 542 colored City pupils who received training in 
speech correction. Nutrition classes were provided for 235 white 
and 64 colored City pupils in the regular grades who formerly 
would have been in special open-air classes. 



34 



1944 Report op Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 26 



Baltimore City Special Classes and Day Camp School for Boys 
Semester Ending June 30, 1944 



Kind of Class 


Number 

of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Percent 
of Attend- 


Promoted or 
Making Satisfactory 
Improvement § 








ance 


Number 


Percentt 



Physically Handicapped White Pupils 





20 


361 


361.6 


85.7 


311 


86.1 


Orthopedic 


8 


157 


158.0 


86.7 


139 


88.5 




4 


67 


69.6 


80.5 


55 


82.1 


Hearing Conservation 


2 


43 


41.0 


87.8 


36 


83.7 


Deaf 


3 


36 


35.0 


85.7 


27 


75.0 


Mixed* 


3 


58 


58.0 


87.9 


54 


93.1 


Socially Handicapped White Pupils 


Day Camp for Boys 


1 


53 


52.1 


78.3 






Physically Handicapped Colored Pupils 


Total and Average 


8 


153 


152.9 


86.5 


103 


67.3 


Open Air 


1 


16 


16.0 


81.3 


12 


75.0 


Orthopedic 


3 


56 


56.0 


87.5 


41 


73.2 




3 


64 


62.9 


87.8 


40 


62.5 


Deaf 


1 


17 


18.0 


83.3 


10 


58.8 


Mentally Handicapped White Pupils 


Total and Average 


103 


2,584 


2,577.0 


79.7 


2,216 


85.8 


Opportvmity 


69 


1,808 


1,811.1 


81.6 


1,544 


85.4 




1 


20 


19.7 


78.7 


16 


80.0 


Shop Center 


33 


756 


747.0 


74.9 


656 


86.8 


Mentally Handicapped Colored Pupils 


Total and Average 


83 


2,274 


2,189.3 


75.8 


1,639 


72.1 




46 


1,339 


1,320.3 


77.8 


964 


72.0 




9 


206 


128.1 


75.3 


144 


69.9 


Shop Center 


28 


729 


740.9 


72.2 


531 


72.8 



t Percent of net roll of classes involved. 

* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 26; 
sight, 11; hearing, 4; and cardiac, 18. 

§ Making satisfactory improvement applies to the opportunity group. 



Baltimore City Classes for Handicapped; White High School 35 
Graduates' Persistence 



CHART 7 



County 



Jotal and 



PERCENT 1944 WHITE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1940 
ELEMENTAIiS' SCHOOL GRAroATES 



Average 
Talbot 
Dorchester 
Worcester 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Howard 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Wicomico 

Caroline 

Harford 

Charles 

Carroll 

Frederick 

Allegany * 

Anne Arundel 

Cecil 

Montgomeiy * 
Queen Anne's 
Garrett 

Prince George's 
Somerset 
Washington * 



122 
202 
138 
100 

68 
139 
1,078 

45 



S14 
458 
641 



530 
81 
220 
596 
97 



Percent 



White 
H.S. 
Grade. 

6,550 53.8 



Percent Boys 



Percent Girls 



64.5 
63.5 
61.6 
60.6 
60.2 
58.9 
58.1 
56,3 



WBiw/////////////m////^^^^ 




6 9-3 y/////////MM/m/m/Mm//My//j7n^ 




222 55.8 EES 
145 55.8 |g? 



54.1 

53.6 



406 53.1 
198 52.5 



52.1 
51.3 
50.1 
49.8 
49.5 



^^3^////////////////////////////////^^^^ 



w^Sm^/////////////////////////////////^^^^ 



^smy//////////////////^^^^ 



m^osw///////////////////////^^^^^ 



WMMMMM^ 



^^^////////////////////////////////////m^^^ 



B&.8 I 

W3sm3y////////////////////////m//////m 



408 43.1 




• Pupils reported promoted from grade 8 of junior high or elementary schools in twelve 
grade Bystems were considered elementary school graduates. For number of graduates for 
individual high schools see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



36 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 8 



PERCENT 1944 COLORED HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1940 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GRADUATES 



County 

Total and 
Co. Average 

Allegany 

Baltimore 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Anne Arundel 

Wicomico 

Kent 

Charles 

Harford 

Somerset 

Cecil 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Talbot 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St, Mary's 

Washington 

Calvert 

Montgomery 

Howard 



Colored 
H. S. Grads. Percent 
Boys Girls 

271 



Percent Boys 



6 
16 
5 
30 
27 
24 
10 
19 
11 
15 
3 
14 
14 
10 
14 
22 
4 
7 
4 
3 
9 
4 



447 
16 
36 
9 
41 
46 
35 



Total 
33.8 

56.4 
54.2 
48.3 
48.0 
42.2 
41.8 



Percent Girls 




iEsxmm////////////////mv^^^^^ 



55.6 

m^^/f/////////////////////////^^^^^ 




13 

9.5 



For number of g-raduates for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



Persistence to High School Graduation; Entrants to 37 
Teachers Colleges 



TABLE 27— Estimated Number and Percent of White and Colored 
Elementary School Graduates Who Graduated from High School 
Four Years Later, by Year 



Year of 
High School 
Grar'uation 



White 
High School 
Graduates 



Percent 
White High 
School Graduates 
Are of Elementary 
School Graduates 
Four Years Before 



Colored 
High School 
Graduates 



Percent 
Colored High 
School Graduates 
Are of Elementary 
School Graduates 
Four Years Before 





Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1927 .... 


2,887 


1,071 


1,816 


39 


4 


33 


5 


43.9 


97 


34 


63 


9.8 


9 


7 


9.9 


1928 .... 


2,993 


1,142 


1,851 


39 


5 


34 





44.0 


117 


42 


75 


10.3 


9 


8 


10.6 


1929 ... 


3,395 


1,339 


2,056 


41 


2 


36 


2 


45.2 


121 


50 


71 


10.2 


10 


3 


10.1 


1930 . , . 


3,785 


1,534 


2,251 


43 


8 


37 


8 


49.0 


169 


63 


106 


13.0 


13 





12.9 


1931 , . . 


4,204 


1,713 


2,491 


45 





39 


9 


49.3 


192 


77 


115 


13.2 


14 


2 


12.7 


1932 


4,397 


1,772 


2,625 


47 





40 


9 


52.2 


288 


124 


164 


18.9 


22 


9 


16.7 


1933 


4,921 


2,114 


2,807 


49 


6 


44 


6 


54.1 


297 


117 


180 


16.4 


16 





16.7 


1934 , . . 


5,122 


2,220 


2,902 


50 


5 


45 


7 


55.0 


318 


128 


190 


18.5 


17 


6 


19.1 


1935 


4,839 


2,052 


2,787 


48 


8 


43 


2 


54.1 


322 


142 


180 


16.2 


16 


1 


16.4 


1936 


5,322 


2,283 


3,039 


49 


2 


44 





53.8 


t374 


tl64 


t210 


n9.o 


tl9 


7 


tl8.5 


1937 . . . 


5,472 


2,361 


3,111 


50 


8 


46 


1 


55.0 


t392 


tl61 


t231 


t20.5 


t20 





t20.9 


1938 , . . 


5,930 


2,566 


3,364 


54 


7 


49 


1 


59.9 


t510 


t202 


t308 


t25.5 


t23 


5 


t27.1 


1939 , . , 


6,306 


2,750 


3,556 


57 


8 


53 





62.2 


t576 


t234 


t342 


t27.9 


t26 


8 


t28.7 


1940 


6,813 


3,017 


3,796 


62 


7 


58 


5 


66.6 


t673 


t245 


t428 


t31.0 


t26 


4 


t34.4 


1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


64 





59 


9 


67.8 


t708 


t249 


t459 t36.8 


t31 


4 


t40.6 


1942 , . . 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


62 


5 


57 


3 


67.3 


t659 


t256 


t403 


t36.8 


t32 


9 


t39.8 


1943 


6,741 


2,886 


3,855 


56 


5 


49 


4 


63.4 


t689 


t269 


t420 


t34.3 


t29 


6 


t38.2 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


53 


8 


42 


2 


64.7 


718 


271 


447 


33.8 


28 


7 


37.9 



t Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the ex- 
pense of Baltimore County. 

TABLE 28 

Number and Percent of County High School Graduates Who Entered State Teachers 

Colleges September after Graduation 



Year 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1984 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 



White 
High 
School 
Graduates 



Boys 



1,713 
1.722 
2.114 
2.220 
2.052 
2,283 
2,361 
2,566 
2,750 
3,017 
3,168 
3,165 
2,886 
2,493 



Girls 



2,491 
2,625 
2,807 
2,902 
2,787 
2,039 
3,111 
3,364 
3,556 
3,796 
3,870 
4,011 
3,855 
4,057 



White Entrants to 
State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 



Number 



Percent 



Boys 



Girls 



Boys 



214 
174 
74 
88 
93 
131 
118 
151 
179 
141 
126 
74 
88 
72 



1.3 

.5 
1.5 
2.8 
2.1 
2.2 
3.2 
2.9 
2.0 
1.1 
1.2 



Girls 



8.6 
6.6 

2.6 
3.0 
3.3 
4.3 
3.8 
4.5 
4.9 
3.7 
3.3 
1.8 
2.3 
1.8 



Year 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 



Colored 
High 
School 

Graduates 



Boys 



77 
124 
117 

128 
142 
tl64 
tl61 
t202 
t234 
t245 
t249 
t256 
t270 
271 



Girls 



115 
164 
180 
190 
180 
t210 
t231 
t308 
t342 
t428 
t459 
t403 
t418 
447 



Colored Entrants to 
State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 



Number 


Percent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


14 


20 


18.2 


17.4 


16 


28 


12.9 


17.1 


3 


17 


2.6 


9.4 


6 


26 


4.7 


13.7 


2 


15 


1.4 


8.3 


8 


16 


4.9 


7.6 


6 


30 


3.7 


13.0 


18 


38 


8.9 


12.3 


7 


21 


3.0 


6.1 


8 


t40 


3.3 


9.3 


5 


2? 


2.1 


5.0 




t25 




6.2 


8 


20 


3.0 


4.8 


6 


32 


2.2 


7.2 



t Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five years' work 
above grade 7. 

For 1944 graduates and teachers college entrants for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



38 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 9 



WHITE GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS ENTERING 


MARYLAND TEACHERS COLLEGES THE FALL FOLLOWING GRADUATION 




Number 


Percent 


County 










1939 


1944 


1944 


County Average 


179 


72 












Wicomico 


20 


11 




Somerset 


1 


n. 
O 




Talbot 


4 


3 




Allegany 


32 


14 




Queen Anne»s 


9 


2 




Garrett 


4 


3 




Worcester 


4 


2 




Harford 


10 


3 




Baltimore 


28 


11 




Frederick 


11 


4 


EB 


Kent 




1 


EEi 


Caroline 


7 


1 


m 


Washington 


9 


3 




Howard 


3 


1 


m 


Dorchester 


6 


1 




Montgomery 


8 


3 


a 


Anne Arundel 


6 




D 


Cecil 


5 


1 


B 


Prince George's 




2 


m 


Carroll 


3 


1 




Calvert 


2 






St. Mary*s 


1 







For graduates and entrants to teachers colleges for individual high schools, see 
Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



Entrants to Teachers Colleges; Graduates Continuing Education 39 

CHART 10 



COLORED GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS 
ENTERING BOWIE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE THE FALL FOLLOWING GEAIUATION 



Coxmty Number Percent 

1943 



County Average 20 



Cecil 1 
Queen Anne* 6 
Harford 1 
Prince George's 
Wicomico 5 
St. Mary's 

Talbot . 3 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Somerset 2 
Kent 

Anne Arundel 
Charles 2 
Baltimore 4 
Caroline 2 



For entrants to Bowie State Teachers College for individual high schools see 
Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



TABLE 29 — Comparison of Number and Percent of County White High 
School Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working 
at Home Year Following Graduation, 1926 to 1943 



Graduates 

OF 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Number 


Percent 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home.Married 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1926 


1,045 


1,574 


507 


856 


88 


323 


48.8 


54.3 


8.5 


20.5 


1927 


1,071 


1,816 


472 


913 


99 


417 


44.1 


50.3 


9.3 


22.9 


1928 


1,142 


1,851 


480 


947 


118 


432 


41.8 


51.2 


10.3 


23.3 


1929 


1,339 


2,056 


527 


1,051 


125 


455 


39.3 


51.3 


9.3 


22.1 


1930. 


1,534 


2,251 


542 


1,031 


223 


694 


35.3 


45.8 


21.5 


28.7 


1931 


1,713 


2,491 


574 


953 


361 


994 


33.5 


38.2 


21.2 


39.8 


1932 


1,772 


2,625 


471 


820 


495 


1,321 


26.6 


31.2 


27.9 


50.4 


1933 


2,114 


2,807 


469 


701 


447 


1,453 


22.2 


25.0 


21.1 


51.8 


1934 


2,223 


2,904 


522 


803 


473 


1,348 


23.5 


27.7 


21.2 


46.4 


1935 


2,052 


2,787 


498 


800 


367 


1,172 


24.3 


28.7 


17.9 


42.0 


1936. 


2,283 


3,039 


613 


980 


244 


1,036 


26.9 


32.3 


10.7 


34.0 


1937 


2,361 


3,111 


652 


1,078 


354 


1,081 


27.6 


34.7 


15.0 


34.7 


1938 


2,566 


3,364 


745 


1,114 


347 


1,249 


29.0 


33.1 


13.5 


37.1 


1939 


2,750 


3,556 


761 


1,118 


254 


1,133 


27.7 


31.4 


9.2 


31.9 


1940 


3,017 


3,796 


*699 


*1,107 


147 


916 


23.1 


29.1 


4.9 


24.1 


1941 


:3,170 


t3,871 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19.6 


26.0 


3.6 


20.0 


1942 


3,144 


3,964 


539 


t832 


24 


540 


17.1 


21.0 


.8 


13.6 


1943 


2,885 


3.846 


313 


953 


8 


434 


10.8 


24.8 


.0 


11.3 



* Includes 10 boys and 2 girls, simultaneously working and studying. 

t Includes 2 boys and 1 girl who received certificates, but did not graduate. 

t Includes 2 girls, simultaneously working and studying. 




40 



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Occupations of White High School Graduates 41 

Distribution of White 1943 County Boy and Girl Graduates According to Specific 
Occupations Reported under Each General Classification in TABLE 30 



Classification of Workers 



Boys Girls Total 



Classification of Workers 



Boys 



Girls 



Professional and Semi-Pro- 

fessional 

c Dancers, Showmen, Athletes 

d Draftsmen . 

e Laboratory technicians . . . . . 

f Librarians 

g Musicians 

h Photographers 

I Proofreaders 

1 Reporters. . 

Unclassified 



II Agriculture— Farming. 
a Managers or owners . . 

b Foremen 

c Laborers (paid) 

d Laborers (unpaid) . . . 



Ill 



Proprietors, Managers & 
Officials, Except Farm. . . . 
a Postmasters and Miscel- 

laneo\is government officials 
c (1) Construction 

(5) Eating & drinking places 

(6) Retail trade, except 

eating and drinking 

Unclassified 



IV Clerical, Sales and 

Kindred Workers 

a Baggage men, express 

messengers, etc 

b Bookkeepers, payroll clerks. 

c Cashiers . 

d File clerks 

e Mail carriers 

f Messengers and errand 

boys and girls, except express 

g Meter readers 

h Office and Calculating 

machine operators. 

i Shipping, receiving and 

stock clerks 

j Stenographers, typists, 

secretaries . _ 

k Telegraph operators 

1 Telephone operators 

m Tellers (Bank) 

n Ticket sellers 

o Timekeepers 

p Other clerical and kindred 

workers 

w Other salesmen and 

saleswomen 

X Wrappers. 



V Craftsmen, Foremen and 

Kindred Workers 

a Bakers 

d Carpenters 

f Electricians. . . . 

g Machinists, millwrights, 

toolmakers 

h Mechanics, repairmen 

k Plumbers, gas and steam 

fitters 

m Printing craftsmen, except 

compositors and typesetters. 

n Radio servicemen 

Other craftsmen and 

kindred workers 



VI Operatives and Kindred 

Workers 

a Apprentices, helpers, learners 

b Assembly — small parts 

c Attendants — filling stations, 
parking lots, etc. . 

d Chauffeurs, bus, taxi and 
truck drivers, etc 

e Crystal grinders 

g Laundry operatives and 
laundresses (except private 
families). 



400 
17 

5 

236 
142 



10 



178 

3 
10 



28 



40 



112 

23 
9 

10 

26 



18 



1811 



35 
4 
159 



20 

13 

748 
2 
82 
11 
1 
3 

555 
173 



1 

n 

12 

418 
17 

244 
152 



h Linemen and servicemen: 
telegraph, telephone, power. . 

i Mine operatives 

1 Power machine sewers. . . .. . 

m Riveters 

n Sailors and deck hands, 

except U. S. Navy 

o Welders and flame cutters . 
q Other specified operatives . . . 

VII Domestic Service Workers 

IN Private Families. . 

Cooks, laundresses, nurses, 

servants, etc 

Girls married running their 
own homes, not otherwise 
occupied 



1989 

3 
45 
4 

187 



1 

20 

29 

767 

82 
12 
2 
6 

601 
213 



VIII Protective Service Work- 
ers 

c Soldiers, sailors, marines, 

coast guards 

d Ushers and doormen 

Firemen 



IX 



165 
23 
28 

12 

27 
1 



Service Workers Except 

Domestic and Protective. 
a Barbers, beauticians, mani- 
curists, hairdressers 

c Cooks, except private 

families 

g Practical nurses 

i Waiters and waitresses ...... 

Other service workers except 
domestic and protective 

Laborers, Except Farm and 

Mine. 

a Fishermen and oystermen 

c Lumbermen, etc 

d Other specified laborers ...... 

VI and IX Operators and Kind- 
red Workers and Labor- 
ers Not Otherwise Speci- 
fied BY Industry 6 r- 10 e 
Manufacturing. 

1 Food, drugs, and kindred 
products 

2 Cotton Manufactures. ....... 

3 Rayon Manufactures 

5 Apparel 

7 Paper, paper products 

8 Electrical, including radio 

9 Chemicals, petroleum 
products 

10 Leather, leather products. .. . 
except footwear 

11 Rubber products 

12 Footwear. 

13 Stone, glass, cement 
products 

14 Iron, steel, metal 
industries 

16 Machinery 

17 Aircraft. . . . 

19 Ships 

20 Transportation except auto- 
mobiles, airplanes and ships . . 

Defense 

Ordnance 

Unclassified. 

6s-l0f Non-Manufacturing 

2 Railroads, railroad repair 
shops. 

3 Transportation, except 
railroads 

6 Wholesale and retail trade. . . 
Unclassified 



XI Unclassified . . . 

Odd jobs 

Staving home. 

Death 

Other 

XII Unknown 



1587 
1585 



121 



21 

289 
48 

♦241 



43 



25 



300 



2 


4 


1 


11 


3 


48 


3 


42 


2 


6 


11 


17 


1 


10 


3 


10 

8 




3 


10 


2 


1 


2 


23 


20 


9 


2 


2 




16 


20 


8 


17 


25 


78 


10 


7 


8 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 




2 


19 


215 


6 


18 


8 


195 


1 




4 


2 


39 


119 



42 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department op Education 



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All Countiei 


Allegany. . 
Anne Arunt 
Baltimore. , 

Calvert 

Caroline . . . 
Carroll 


Charles. . . 
Dorchester. 
Frederick . . 
Garrett. . . 
Harford. . . 
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Montgomer 
Prince Geoi 
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St. Mary's. 
Somerset. . 
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Washingtor 
Wicomico. 
Worcester. 



Maryland Colleges Attended by 1943 Graduates; Occupations 43 
OF Colored High School Graduates 



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County 


Total 1943 

1944 

Anne Arundel .... 
Baltimore 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Charles 


uorcnester 

Frederick 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Wicomico 



46 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 35 



Enrollment in Each Year of Last Four Years of Maryland County High 
Schools for White Pupils by Year, 1925-1944 



Year 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


Post- 
Graduates 


Total 


1925 


6,772 


4,453 


3,281 


2,732 




17,238 


1926 


7,558 


4,777 


3,610 


2,748 




18,693 


1927 


7,871 


5,363 


3,856 


3,067 




20,157 




8,487 


5,636 


4,257 


3,178 




21 , 558 


1929 


8,587 


6,100 


4,694 


3,612 




22,993 


1930 


9,038 


6,292 


5,080 


3,981 


' 26 


24,417 


1931 


9,777 


6,969 


5,490 


4,338 


21 


26,595 




9,662 


7,636 


6,070 


4,646 


153 


28,167 




10,548 


7,658 


6,720 


5,207 


169 


30,302 


1934 


10,629 


8,016 


6,381 


5,404 


91 


30,521 




11,072 


8,162 


6,731 


5,110 


153 


31,228 


1936 


11,267 


8,749 


6,927 


5,526 


127 


32,596 


1937 


11,267 


8,907 


7,456 


5,675 


93 


33,398 


1938 


11,256 


8,883 


7,586 


6,080 


113 


33,918 




12,064 


9,332 


8,062 


6,478 


198 


36,134 


1940 


12,206 


10,073 


8,352 


7,041 


186 


37,858 


19^1 


12,554 


10,342 


8,848 


7,323 


158 


39,225 


1942 


12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


39,316 


1943 


12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


38,394 




12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


36,797 



For enrollment of individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230-235. 



TABLE 36 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland 
County High Schools for the Year 1943-44 



County 


I 


II 


English 
III 


IV 


V 


Journal- 
ism 


Public 
Speak- 
ing 


Total 1942-43 


12,552 


10,234 


8,766 


7,125 


33 


157 


t99 


1943-44 


12,122 


10,008 


8,125 


7,064 


25 


311 


310 




1,100 


998 


803 


666 




131 


39 




878 


704 


601 


441 










2,082 


1,703 


1,380 


1,146 




67 


36 


Calvert 


97 


70 


59 


47 










238 


201 


166 


171 










535 


441 


389 


329 




75 


75 


Cecil 


395 


309 


251 


234 










197 


164 


113 


118 










285 


240 


199 


219 


25 








747 


611 


512 


473 










322 


287 


246 


228 




25 






520 


422 


311 


319 










225 


186 


144 


147 








Kent 


135 


122 


99 


110 










943 


759 


629 


534 






160 




1,368 


1,047 


797 


631 




is 




Queen Anne's 


153 


125 


129 


108 










125 


112 


90 


75 










168 


156 


126 


109 








Talbot 


174 


168 


149 


135 










849 


673 


520 


423 










376 


327 


223 


234 










210 


183 


189 


167 









* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes 17 pupils taking military English. 



White High School Enrollment by Year, by English and 47 
Mathematics Courses Taken 



TABLE 37 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics in the Maryland 
County High Schools, by Year 1934 to 1944, and by County, 1943-44 
































Year 






l-H 






>> 

u 




>> 


Revie 


iview 


d Ap- 


nd 

thmet 


■h- 
to 
_C 

'.B 


AND 


8 




8 








>> 


ii 

4^ 






d S 






County 


General 
Mathemati 


General 
Mathemati 


Algebra I 


j Algebra II 


Plane Geom( 


1 Trigonometr 


Solid Geome 


Mathematici 


Arithmetic I 

1 


Vocational a 
plied Math 


Commercial 
Business Ai 


Business Trj 


1933-34 


2,509 






9,082 


3,915 


4,507 


1,067 


560 


455 


807 


204 






1934-35 


3,881 






8,508 


3,865 


4,269 


713 


528 


260 


502 


193 






1935-36 


5,838 






7,384 


3,598 


4,183 


792 


533 


330 


418 


178 


447 




1936-37 


6,174 






7,292 


3,482 


3 , 938 


757 


500 


241 


339 


43 


284 




1937-38 


6,309 






7,172 


3,225 


4,033 


694 


558 


281 


161 


32 


983 




1938-39 


°5,861 


°1 


182 


7,694 


3,255 


3,643 


'676 


594 


136 


58 


208 


1,234 


80 


1939-40 


6,994 


1 


360 


6.404 


3,400 


3,897 


764 


610 


133 


88 


436 


1,033 


355 


1940-41 


7,550 


1 


512 


5,834 


3,057 


3,533 


727 


637 


184 


78 


475 


1,173 


818 


1941-42 


7,663 


1 


503 


5,638 


2,717 


3,366 


667 


536 


167 


81 


685 


1,065 


360 


1942-43 


7,780 


1 


639 


5,794 


2,757 


3,092 


714 


520 


391 


211 


599 


919 


317 


1943-44 


6,905 


1 


479 


6,369 


3,100 


3,288 


793 


364 


579 


162 


600 


885 


225 












By County, 


1943-44 














338 






723 


262 


320 


107 


7 


111 




208 


24 




Anne Arundel 


504 




'88 


416 


214 


194 


61 


42 


15 




121 


248 




Baltimore 


1,276 




228 


1,043 


723 


548 


164 


79 


67 




79 






Calvert 


55 




28 


39 


42 




9 
















116 




99 


116 


80 


' "72 


16 






"69 




' '63 




Carroll 


383 




26 


269 


137 


148 


37 


"i9 


"26 






175 




Cecil 


211 




193 


217 


147 


56 


8 


7 








47 


■ "28 




171 




10 


111 


13 


67 






' 'ei 








8 




238 




34 


86 


43 


116 


' ' '8 










■i32 




Frederick 


509 




45 


307 


153 


214 


99 


' '26 


'i74 








"'24 


Garrett 


264 




47 


188 


29 


50 






47 


' '36 


■ '2i 


■ '22 






361 




233 


220 


115 


152 


' '26 


"ie 


27 


63 




25 


"19 


Howard 


221 






115 


23 


28 
















Kent 


85 




79 


53 


46 


36 


' '24 










"i9 




Montgomery 


391 




44 


664 


321 


338 


56 


' '49 


■ '23 




"i2 




' '27 


Prince George's. . . 


655 




48 


775 


281 


440 


66 


56 


9 






"26 






138 




83 


36 


35 


74 












8 


* "31 


St. Mary's 


24 






62 


64 


22 


"ii 




"is 






56 




Somerset 


111 




'28 


70 


14 


43 












7 


' '24 


Talbot 


129 






66 


16 


59 


"i7 


"ii 








29 


44 




424 






428 


147 


204 


66 


34 


■ ' "6 




'i59 








63 






365 


127 


92 


18 


18 








"io 


■ '26 


Worcester 


238 




i66 




68 


15 

















* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
° In 1938-39 general mathematics was separated for the first time into I and II. 

t Enrollment shown includes all classes in business arithmetic and business training taught by teachers 
certificated for mathematics. The remaining classes in these subjects appear in Tables 38 and 42, pages 48 & 51 



48 1944 Report of Maryland 



State Department of Education 



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White High School Enrollment in Various Branches of 49 
Social Studies and Science 



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50 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 40 



White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland County 
High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1925 to 1944 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


German 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1925 


2,076 


3,333 


1,411 


2.306 


38 


39 


8 


10 


1926 


2,154 


3,497 


1,400 


2,428 


31 


29 


6 


2 


1927 


2,335 


3,535 


1,379 


2,532 


24 


17 






1928 


2,494 


3,510 


1,420 


2,690 


19 


10 






1929 


2,271 


3,475 


1,656 


2,751 


34 


26 






1930 


2,338 


3,446 


1,567 


2,713 


46 


57 






1931 


2,534 


3,684 


1,598 


2,786 


22 


13 






1932 


2,559 


3,683 


1,762 


2,967 


53 


26 






1933 


2,421 


3,713 


1,989 


3,237 


46 


26 






1934 


2,460 


3,746 


1,850 


3,149 


30 


28 






1935 


2,272 


3,409 


1,601 


2,966 


36 


52 






1936 


2,106 


3,208 


1,604 


2,872 


36 


48 






1937 


2,141 


3,218 


1,589 


2,617 


36 


29 


io 


3 


1938 


2,115 


3,155 


1,545 


2,664 


34 


20 


27 


10 


1939 


2,249 


3,276 


1,547 


2,663 


25 


29 


17 


5 


1940 


2,115 


3,328 


1,468 


2,594 


33 


48 


5 


5 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 






1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 






1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 






1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 







TABLE 41 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Years Ending 
June 30, 1925 to 1944 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


Boys 


General 


Vocational 


1925 


4,338 




814 


6,266 


465 




4,256 




869 


6,595 


546 


1927 


4,905 


' si 


922 


7,304 


618 


1928 


5,341 


39 


948 


7,797 


587 




5,528 


69 


929 


8,079 


516 


1930 


5,549 


201 


931 


7,690 


543 


1931 


6,107 


368 


1,100 


7,753 


566 




6,041 


418 


1,264 


7,461 


770 


1933 


6,380 


520 


1,260 


7,823 


720 


1934 


6,536 


410 


1,278 


7,908 


780 




6,873 


403 


1,389 


8,065 


1,040 




6,928 


772 


1,482 


7,259 


1,330 


1937 


7,489 


521 


1,644 


8,184 


1,324 


1938 


7,844 


578 


1,833 


8,105 


1,793 




8,318 


842 


2,049 


8,333 


2,613 




9,415 


892 


2,344 


8,903 


2,920 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3,287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 




10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 




8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an 
institution. 

For 1944 enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIV, pages 236 to 241. 



White Enrollment Taking Foreign Languages, Practical Arts 51 
AND Business Subjects 



Distribu- 
tive Ed- 
ucation 


o 




PQ 




ii 


O 




PQ 




Commer- 
cial Law 


O 




m 






o 




PQ 




Office and 

Social 
Practice 


O 




PQ 






O 




PQ 


SgS§gS|3S|5 


Commercial 
or Economic 
Geographyt 


O 


f« /^^ «1 ..i^ _li ~1 ./N ./^ ^ 

sliisii^lli 


m 




i 


o 




PQ 


589 
1 , 101 
1,173 
1,499 

728 
1,014 
1,431 
1,166 
1.104 
1,103 

936 



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52 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 43 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art and Physical Education in Maryland 
County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1931 to 1944 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 














June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1931 


7,119 


8,645 


315 


378 


3,594 


3,614 


1932 


7,031 


8,477 


671 


714 


3,976 


4,168 


1933 


7,714 


9,128 


741 


737 


4,722 


4,387 


1934 


7,465 


8,865 


529 


541 


4,601 


4,572 


1935 


7,461 


8,840 


537 


538 


4,813 


4,699 


1936 


7,526 


9,134 


418 


571 


5,413 


5,182 


1937 


7,579 


9,422 


535 


594 


5,483 


5,276 


1938 


7,333 


9,519 


910 


1,159 


5,793 


5,917 


1939 


7,840 


9,967 


1,534 


1,984 


6,935 


6,934 




7,978 


10,585 


1,836 


2,254 


8,216 


8,168 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2,472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13.277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 



* Excludes duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an insti- 
tution. 

For 1944 enrollment in individual high schools see Table XXIV, pages 236 to 241. 



White Enrollment Taking Music, Art and Physical Education 53 
AND in Orchestras, Bands and Glee Clubs 



N -N to -to a> If o t- o i-i eo ooooot- oo lo iHOjooeo on ioihco'* 

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t|is||IJPl§i^l?ililffl^li 



54 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Senior Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




00> COCO 


CO 


OOiH 




(Did C) Tl< 
CO CO • • 




r^(0 r-tlO 
N r-l t>I> 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


t> lO . . 
(NCg OOOS 


Junior Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 


■>* 




CO 


IN t> OiC^l 

t-t- • ■ 

rH(N 


ca 


(NO tH(N 
ICOO • • 
iHrH 




482 
419 

13.0 
12.2 


Total 
Number 
FaUing 


754 
728 

OA q 

21.1 


Sophomore Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




%DOi (NOS 


CO 


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503 
594 

10.9 
13.7 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


833 
987 

ten 
22.8 


Freshman Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




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680 

11.4 
11.6 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


1,343 
1,416 

24.2 


County 


Total Number 1943. 

1944. 

County Average 1943 . 

1944. 



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White Withdrawals and Failures by Subject; High School 57 
Teaching Staffs by Subject 



TABLE 48 

Number of County White Teachers Distributed by Subjects Taught in Last 
Four Years of High School, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Subjects 


Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 


Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 
Each 
Subject 

Service 
1944 


Number 
of Cases Where 
Teachers Instruct 

in More Than 
One High School 
Each Week or Term 


XT L 

Number 
of Dif- 
ferent 
Indi- 
viduals 
Teaching 

Each 
Subject 
1944 


1942 


1943 


1944 


Teachers 


High 
Schools 


English 


254.4 


243.3 


235 





143 


1 


2 


398 


Social Studies 


224.5 


215.2 


207 


9 


143 


1 


2 


391 


Science 


187.2 


187.8 


180 


8 


143 






397 


Mathematics 


163.3 


161.1 


160 


4 


143 






342 


Latin 


36.9 


35.3 


34 


5 


74 






85 


French 


37.4 


31.2 


26 


4 


75 






77 


Spanish 


2.7 


5.7 


8 


8 


17 






18 


Library 


42.8 


41.9 


42 


4 


95 






118 


Business and Dis- 


















tributive Ed 


137.7 


140.3 


135 


3 


77 




2 


174 


Home Economics. . 


119.1 


120.6 


116 


4 


125 


. 6 


13 


168 


Industrial Work . . . 


102.2 


98.8 


89 


4 


91 


8 


17 


136 


Physical Education 


64.9 


73.2 


81 


2 


101 


5 


13 


259 


Music 


58.0 


57.7 


51 


8 


112 


14 


41 


138 


Agriculture 


34.7 


30.5 


27 


2 


57 


11 


27 


57 


Art 


28.3 


21.9 


21 


2 


38 


6 


13 


40 


Administration and 


















Supervision 


83.4 


79.9 


80 


6 


124 






173 


Guidance 


18.7 


17.8 


24 


1 


81 






113 


Total 


1,596.2 


1,562.2 


1,523 


4 


143 









TABLE 49 

f^umber of County Colored High School Teachers Distributed by Subjects 
Taught, Year Ending June 3©, 1944 



Academic 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1943 



1944 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 

1944 



Special 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1943 



1944 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 

1944 



English 

Science 

Social Studies . . . 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Spanish 

Library 

Administration 
and Supervision 
Guidance 



28.8 
28.7 
29.3 
23.0 
.6 
.2 
2.1 

7.3 
2.7 



28.8 
28.6 
28.5 
24.0 



7.3 
2.9 



Home Econ 

Agriculture 

Industrial Work 

Physical Ed 

Music 

Art 

Total Academic 
and Special 
Subjects 



23.9 
12.5 
10.6 
10.7 
7.7 



188.4 



27.1 
11.9 
10.8 
11.1 
8.6 
.2 



194.2 



32 



58 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 50— Number of Clerks Employed in County Schools 1943-44 





Number of Clerks 






(^OUNTY 






1 otal 


Average 








Salaries 


Annual 




1942-43 


1943-44 




Salary 




33.1 


38.58 




$1 062 








Montgomery 


8.5 


10.53 


$18,383.27 


1,746 




7.0 


aS 


7,965.70 


996 




7.0 


7 


5,476.10 


782 


Prince George's 


3.0 


t5 


2,601.97 


520 




2.0 


2 


2,776.75 


1,388 




1.0 


2 


1,400.00 


700 


Carroll 


1.0 


1 


1,097.00 


1,097 


Wicomico 


1.6 


°1.05 


578.09 


551 




1.0 


1 


450.00 


450 


Harford 




1 


250.00 


250 


Garrett 


i'.o 



















a Includes 3 in elementary schools, 
t Includes 3 part-time. 

° Includes 2 part-time, .5 in white high school and .55 in colored high school. 



TABLE 51 

Number of Certificates Issuedt in 1941-2, 1942-3 and 1943-4 



Grade of Certificate 



Administration and Super%'ision: 

Administration and Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervision Special Subjects 

Attendance Officer 

High School: 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Non-public 

Elementary: 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Advanced First grade 

First Grade 

Second Grade 

Non-public Advanced First Grade 

Non-public First Grade 

Non-public Bachelor of Science 

War Emergency Certificates: 
Degree: 

H gh School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

on-degree: 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching 

Attendance Officer 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1941-42 



10 

203 



21 

302 



1942-43 



D 

212 
103 
49 
51 



15 
442 
4 

144 

18 



18 



* Up to June 30, 1944. 

t To white and colored teachers. 



Clerks in County Schools; Certificates Issued to County 59 
Teachers ; Graduates Certificated Who Took 
High School Positions; Men Teachers 



TABLE 52 

Maryland Students Who Completed in June 1943, at Colleges Indicated, 
the Education Courses Necessary for Certification Compared with 
the Number of Graduates Who Took Positions in the County 
High Schools in the Fall of 1943* 



Number op Graduates 





Who Met Requirements for 




College 


Certification from 


Who Received 








Maryland County 








High School 




Maryland 


Baltimore 


Positions* 




Counties 


City 




Western Maryland College 


36 


9 


27 




31 


13 


19 




14 


4 


14 




15 


3 


12 




1 


6 


1 


St. Joseph's College 


1 


2 







1 


5 


1 


College of Notre Dame 





7 


1 



♦According to reports from colleges. 



TABLE 53 — Number and Percent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties 



Year 
Ending 
June 30. 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


1941 




232 


8.6 


719 


40.5 


74 


11.9 


83 


47.8 


1942, 




190 


7.1 


670 


36.2 


66 


10.9 


89 


46.4 


1943 




139 


5.2 


538 


29.7 


58 


9.7 


81 


42.0 


1944. 




108 


4.0 


488 


27.3 


44 


7.5 


72 


34.8 



See Table X, pages 215 to 216. 



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Certification of County Colored Teachers; Withdrawals 63 
OF County Teachers by Subject and Sex 



TABLE 57 

Withdrawals of County Teachers by Subject and Sex, 1943-44 



Subject 



Total 



Men 



Wo- 
men 



Subject 



Total 



White High School Teachers 

English 

English, Library 

English, Math 

English, Soc. St 

English, Science 

English, Languages 

English, Music 

English, Phys. Ed 

Eng., Soc. St., Music. . . , 

English, Commercial 

Eng., Lang., Soc. St 

Eng., Sci., Soc. St 

Eng., Math., Soc. St 

Mathematics 

Math., Soc. St 

Math., Science 

Math., Lang 

Math., Soc. St., Music. . . 

Math., Ind. Work 

Math., Phys. Ed 

Math., Commercial 

Social Studies 

Social Studies, Science. . . 
Social Studies, Lang 

White El. School Teachers. . 



619 



147 



472 



Soc. St., InS. Work 

Soc. St., Com 

Soc. St., Music 

Soc. St., Phys. Ed 

Soc. St., Math., Music. 

Science 

Science, Home, Ec 

Science, Music 

Sci., Ind. Work 

Science, Agriculture 

Science, Physical Ed.. . 

Languages 

Industrial Work 

Home Economics 

Home Ec, Phys. Ed.. . 

Agriculture 

Commercial 

Com. and Phys. Ed.. . . 

Music 

Art 

Physical Education. . . . 

Library 

Adm. and Super 

Grade 7 

Unknown 



581 



27 



554 



Col. High School Teachers 

English 

English, Math 

English, Soc. St 

English, Science 

English, Phys. Ed 

Mathematics 

Math., Sci 

Math., Music 

Social Studies 

Social Studies, Science. . 

Col. EI. School Teachers. . 



70 



23 



47 



Soc. St., Phys. Ed. 

Science 

Science, Phys. Ed. 
Science, Ind. Work 
Industrial Work . . . 

Agriciilture 

Ag., Science 

Home Economics. . 
Home Ec, Soc. St. 
Home Ec, Science. 



137 



21 



116 



64 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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66 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 

Number and Percent of Teachers New to the Maryland County Schools 

1933 to 1944 





New to Counties 




Number New to County Who Were 








Change in Numbers 
of Teaching Positions 
October to October 




Experienced 


Year 


Number" 


Percent" 


Inexperienced 


But New 
to State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 
County 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County 


Substitutes and 
Withdr awals 
During Year i 
Who 

Returned '^^ 1 



White Elementary School Teachers 



1933-34 , 


169 


6.1 


—27 


115 


12 


30 


3 


5 


12 


1934-35 


192 


7.0 


—16 


155 


10 


21 


7 


3 




1935-36 


163 


6.0 


—6 


115 


7 


33 


10 


3 


li 


1936-37 


201 


7.3 


+ 17 


141 


19 


35 


10 


3 




1937-38 


203 


7.4 


—18 


82 


40 


52 


40 


4 


29 


1938-39 


195 


7.2 


—20 


107 


22 


41 


18 


7 


25 


1939-40 


199 


7.4 


—17 


106 


18 


49 


18 


4 


26 


1940-41 


205 


7.6 


—5 


127 


29 


29 


19 


10 


20 


1941-42 , 


355 


13.4 


—38 


142 


63 


83 


31 


4 


67 


1942-43 


565 


21.2 


+ 8 


272 


169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44 


568 


21.0 


+ 42 


165 


215 


131 


49 


5 


57 


White High School Teachers 


1933-34 


107 


7.9 


+ 11 


70 


14 


17 


9 


151 


6 


1934-35 


169 


12.1 


+ 36 


122 


28 


17 


16 


3 


2 


1935-36 , 


197 


13,6 


+ 57 


149 


17 


20 


16 


8 


11 


1936-37 


191 


12.8 


+ 48 


123 


36 


26 


13 


8 


6 


1937-38 


231 


14.5 


+ 92 


129 


66 


21 


25 


10 


15 


1938-39 


220 


13.2 


+ 82 


144 


37 


16 


25 


13 


2Z 


1939-40 


242 


13.9 


+ 72 


156 


38 


17 


19 


13 


31 


1940-41 


262 


14.7 


+ 45 


173 


44 


33 


20 


7 


12 


1941-42 


421 


22.6 


+ 73 


233 


111 


51 


25 


30 


26 


1942-43 


587 


31.9 


— 19 


270 


237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 


531 


29.7 


—55.4 


196 


241 


44 


58 


27 


20. 



Colored Elementary School Teachers 



1933-34 


73 


10.4 


—14 


48 


8 


12 


19 




5 


1934-35 


96 


13.5 


+ 8 


74 


1 


20 


13 




1 


1935-36 


70 


9.9 


—4 


57 


2 


9 


24 




2 


1936-37 


57 


8.2 


—9 


39 


5 


12 


22 




1 


1937-38 


47 


6.9 


—23 


35 


1 


7 


21 




4 


1938-39 


50 


7.6 


—18 


40 


4 


5 


25 




1 


1939-40 


57 


8.9 


—17 


42 


3 


11 


22 




1 


1940-41 


41 


6.5 


—14 


30 


2 


7 


7 




2 


1941-42 


59 


9.8 


—24 


37 


5 


9 


5 




8 


1942-43 ... 


87 


14.6 


—9 


65 


9 


13 


9 




ii 


1943-44 , , 


125 


21.1 


—6 


81 


18 


15 


9 





Colored High School Teachers 



1933-34 


15 


f 16.0 


+ 1 


11 


3 




7 




1 


1934-35 


20 


19.6 


+ 8 


17 


1 


i 


1 




1 


1935-36 


25 


23.2 


+ 6 


15 


4 


1 


8 




5 


1936-37 


28 


23.9 


+ 9 


21 


6 




11 




1 


1937-38 


38 


28.4 


+ 17 


30 


8 




8 






1938-39 


35 


23.6 


+ 14 


27 


5 


'2 


8 




i 


1939-40 


35 


20.8 


+20 


29 


3 


1 


10 


'4 


2 


1940-41 


42 


23.3 


+ 12 


32 


7 


1 


6 
3 




2 


1941-42 


38 


19.9 


+ 11 


27 


7 


4 


*4 




1942-43 


65 


33.2 


+ 5 


49 


10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44 


80 


38.0 


+ 14.6 


52 


19 


3 


4 


1 


6 



° Excludes from total number and percent new to couniies, teachers who transferred from county 
to county, and from other type of school in the same county. 



Turnover of County Teachers by Year; Turnover of White 67 
Elementary Teachers by County 



TABLE 61 



Number and Percent of White Elementary School Teachers* New to the 
Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year, 1943-44 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


Inexperienced 


Experienced 


But New 
to State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceeding Years 


From Another 
County 


From High 
School in 
Same County 


Substitutes & 
Withdrawals 

During Year 
1 Who Returned 


Total and Average 


°568 


°21.0 


+ 41.7 


165 


215 


131 


°49 


°5 


57 


Worcester 


1 


2.2 


—1 






1 








Queen Anne 's 




2.8 


—2 






1 










7 


9.3 


—4 




i 


2 


4 








15 


9.7 


—4 


6 


2 


4 






3 




30 


11.9 





5 


4 


8 


'9 




3 


Washington 


31 


14.2 


—5 


15 


1 


7 


3 




5 




9 


15.8 


—1 


3 


2 


1 


2 




1 


Talbot 


6 


15.8 


+ 1 






6 










11 


17.2 


—3 




i 


6 


'3 






Carroll 


19 


17.4 


—1 


9 


3 


5 






'2 




7 


17.5 


—4 


3 


3 




'i 






Kent 


6 


17.6 







1 


4 






i 


Cecil 


15 


17.9 


+ 3 


4 


5 


3 


"i 




2 




27 


21.6 


—1 


8 


12 


5 






2 


Caroline 


9 


22.0 


+ 3 




4 


5 








Calvert 


5 


23.8 


—1 




2 


1 






'2 


Anne Arundel 


45 


25.4 


+ 6 


9 


19 


7 


'3 




7 


Baltimore 


101 


25.9 


+38 


47 


33 


14 


3 




3 


Garrett. . 


27 


26.7 


—2 


4 


3 


17 


1 




2 


Montgomery 


89 


34.6 


+ 13 


20 


41 


13 


7 




6 


St Mary's 


11 


37.0 


+ 1.7 


4 


4 


2 


1 






Prince George's 


128 


40.0 


+ 4 


23 


63 


17 


9 




16 




22 


50.0 


+ 1 


5 


11 


2 


2 




2 



* Teachers in grades 7 and 8 of junior or junior-senior high schools are excluded from this Table. 
They are included in Table 62, page 69. 

° Teachers who transferred from one coimty to another, and from a high school in the same 
county are excluded from total for counties as a group. 
No data were received from Baltimore City. 



68 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 62 



Number and Percent of White Regular, Senior High, Junior High, and 
Junior-Senior High School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County During the School Year, 1943-44 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


Inexperienced 


Experienced 


But New 
to State 


In Counties 

But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 
County 


From Elemen- 
tary School in 
Same County 


Substitutes & 
Withdrawals 
During Year 

Who Returned 




















IMI 


Total and Average 


°531 


°29.7 


—55.4 


196 


241 


74 


°58 


°27 


20 


Wicomico 


9 


16.5 


— .4 


4 


1 


2 


1 


1 




Frederick 


18 


20.2 


—9 


11 


2 


4 


1 








6 


24.0 


—2 


2 


2 


2 








Carroll 


23 


25.6 





7 


9 


4 


2 




i 


Worcester 


9 


25.7 


—2 


3 


4 


1 


1 






Kent 


6 


26.1 


—1 


2 


1 


2 


1 






Harford 


19 


26.4 


—1 


5 


9 




5 


io 




Allegany 


59 


27.2 


—7 


12 


13 


15 


4 


5 




8 


27.6 


—2 


2 


4 


1 






1 


Baltimore 


56 


28.3 


—11 


25 


12 


7 


9 


i 


2 


Washington 


49 


30.2 


+ 9 


15 


16 


3 


5 


10 


ii 


Anne Arundel 


32 


31.7 





8 


16 


4 


3 


i 


Garrett 


15 


31.9 


—1 


9 


3 


1 


1 






17 


38.3 


—2.6 


9 


3 


2 


2 


1 






15 


39.5 


—7 


5 


7 


2 








Howard 


14 


40.0 


—2 


5 


7 


1 


1 






Cecil 


24 


45.3 


—12 


11 


7 


5 






*i 


Montgomery 


104 


46.4 


+4 


10 


72 


10 


10 


i 


1 


Talbot 


15 


50.0 


—2 


10 




2 


2 


1 


2 




82 


51.7 


—7.4 


26 


42 


5 


6 


1 


Charles 


15 


51.7 


—1 


6 


5 


1 


1 




2 


St. Mary's 


13 


61.9 


+2 


6 


6 




1 






Calvert 


8 


72.7 





3 










4 



° Teachers who transferred from one county to another, and from an elementary school in the 
same county are excluded from the total for counties as a group. 
No data were received from Baltimore City. 



White High School and Colored Teachers New to Individual 69 

Counties 



TABLE 63 — Number and Percent of Colored Elementary School Teachers 
New to Schools of Each Individual County During 1943-44 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


Inexperienced 


But New 
to State 


Exper 

In 

Counties 
or City 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From Another g 
County a 


Substitutes 
and Withdraw- 
als During Year 
Who Returned 


Total and Average 


°125 


"21.1 


—6 


81 


18 


15 


°9 


11 




1 


4.8 


—1 


1 










Harford 


2 


8.7 







i 


1 






Queen Anne 's 


2 


12.5 


—3 


2 












2 


13.3 





1 






"i 




Montgomery 


6 


13.6 


+ 1 


4 


2 










5 


16.1 





3 






2 






14 


17.3 





8 




4 


1 






6 


18.2 





3 


"i 


1 


1 




Frederick 


4 


21.1 





3 




1 








20 


23.0 


+ 2 


7 


5 


- 8 


i 




Worcest«jr 


6 


25.0 


—1 


5 






1 






7 


26.9 


—2 


5 


2 








Kent 


5 


33.3 


—1 


4 




i 






Talbot 


7 


35.0 





4 


i 


1 


i 




Carroll 


3 


37.5 





1 


1 






"i 


Calvert 


10 


38.5 


+1 


5 


2 


i 


i 


1 


Baltimore 


17 


43.6 


—1 


9 


2 


2 




4 


Washington 


2 


60.0 





2 












15 


51.7 


—1 


14 


i 









TABLE 64— Number and Percent of Colored High School Teachers 
New to Schools of Each Individual County During 1943-44 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


Inexperienced 


1 But New 
to State 


In Counties 

But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


Experien 
S5 

1i 


From Elemen- ^ 
tary School in 
Same County 


Substitutes & 
Withdrawals 
During Year 

Who Retxirned | 




°80 


°38.0 


+ 14.6 


52 


19 


3 


°4 


°1 


6 


St. Mary's 








—2 














Harford 


1 


13.2 


+ .6 






i 








Anne Arundel 


4 


18.2 


+4 


2 


2 












4 


30.8 


+ 4 


3 


1 












5 


31.3 





2 


1 












3 


33.3 





3 














5 


38.5 


+ 1 


4 


i 










Dorchester 


5 


38.5 


+ 2 


3 


1 








"i 


Cecil 


2 


40.0 







2 












2 


40.0 





2 














8 


42.9 


—1 


3 














9 


47.4 


+1 


6 


i 










Worcester 


5 


45.5 


+ 1 


8 










2 




8 


50.0 


•0 




3 












2 


50.0 


—1 


2 












Baltimore 


7 


53.8 


+2 


2 


2 






i 


"i 


Kent 


4 


80.0 





1 










1 


Howard 


4 


80.0 


+ 1 


4 














11 


91.7 


+ 2 


8 


2 








i 


Calvert 


6 


100.0 




i 


4 


2 











° Teachers who transferred from one county to another, and from schools in the 
same county are excluded from total for counties as a group. 
No data were received from Baltimore City. 



70 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 65— County Teachers in Service October, 1943, Who Attended 
Summer School in the Summer of 1943 



County 


Teachers Employed Oct. 
1943 who Attended Sum- 
mer School in 1943 


Summer School Attended 


Number on 
County 
Staff 


Number 


Percent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 



White County Teachers 



Total White. . . . 


$289 


106 


10 


7 


5 


9 


Allegany 


42 


17 


17 


3 


7 


8 


Anne Arundel . . . 


22 


9 


12 


4 


8 


9 




t9 


6 


2 


3 


3 





Calvert 














Caroline 














Carroll 


ii 


6 


10 


i 


6 


7 


Cecil 


t9 




10 


7 






Charles 


2 




4 


5 






Dorchester 


t2 


i 


3 


1 


2 


3 


Frederick 


13 


3 


8 


4 


3 


4 




19 


3 


18 


8 


6 


4 


Harford 


11 




8 


8 






Howard 


°13 


i 


22 


8 


2 


9 


Kent 


nil 


5 


32 


.4 


21 


7 


Montgomery 


27 


20 


10 


.5 


8 


9 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


11 


11 


3 


.4 


6 


9 


1 


1 


2 


.8 


4 





St. Mary's 


tl 




3 


.4 








tl6 




40 









Talbot 


5 


i 


13 


.2 


3 


.3 


Washington .... 


43 


15 


19 


.7 


9 


.3 




17 


5 


22 


.7 


9 


.2 


Worcester 


4 


2 


8 


.9 


5 


.7 



Total 

Frostburg State Teachers College 
University of Maryland. ....... 

Salisbury State Teachers College. 

Columbia University 

Towson State Teachers College. . 

Western Maryland College 

Johns Hopkins University 

Washington College 

Duke University 

Shepherd State Teachers College . 

Shepherdstown 

George Washington University . . 

Mary Washington College 

Catholic University 

41 Others 



296 106 



64 
t46 
60 

tttt23 
22 
14 
°tl4 
♦11 

4 
4 
5 
1 



18 



Colored County Teachers 



Total Colored . . . 


80 


34 


13 


6 


16 


1 


Allegany 


1 




25 









Anne Arundel . . . 


6 


6 


7 


4 


27 


3 




9 


5 


23 


1 


38 


5 


Calvert 


5 




19 


2 








4 


'3 


28 


6 


42 


9 


Carroll 














Cecil 


"2 




22 


2 






Charles 


1 




3 









Dorchester 


3 


i 


11 


5 


7 


7 


Frederick 


4 


1 


21 


1 


14 


3 




3 


1 


13 





13 


2 


Howard 


1 


1 


6 


7 


20 





Kent 














Montgomery 


is 


'5 


34 


i 


38 


.5 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


5 


3 


5 


7 


15 


.8 


2 




12 


5 








4 




19 





14 


.3 


Somerset 


5 


2 


17 


2 


16 


.7 


Talbot 


1 


1 


5 





11 


.1 


Washington .... 










12 






'4 


'2 


12 


.9 


.5 


Worcester 


5 


2 


20 


.8 


18 


.2 



Total 

Morgan State College 

Hampton Institute 

Howard University 

Temple University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Columbia University 

New York University 

Catholic University 

17 Others 



JExcludes 6 supervisors and 1 attendance officer. 
fExcludes a supervisor. 
""Excludes an attendance officer. 
*Includes 3 who took winter course. 



Summer School Attendance of Teachers; Average Number 
OF Pupils Belonging per Teacher 



71 



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eoco-^eocgcgcocgiNeoeocgcgcgcgcgcgiMiMc^qcoeccg eg 

t> . . . •cDinco-^ocoxcoegcoincrjOiosint-in oo 

eg • • • • CO in o X rHin o> eg X CD CO eo 1-icg t> eg 

eg • • • • iH eg eg eg 1-1 eg eg eg eg 1-1 eg eg eg eg 1-1 eg eg eg 

X X X OCD CO X ^ 1-I05 CO O eo 1-1 1-lX t-X X t- CO CO • -t-oi 

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E.2.S 



72 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 11 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WIITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 

IN ELEIdENTAFi SCHOOLS (GPj^DES 1 - 7 OR 8) 




• Excludes elementary school at Stnte teachers college. 

t Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 25.2 in 1944, 24.9 in 1943 and 25.0 in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 224. 



% 



1 Average Number of White Pupils Belonging per Teacher 78 



CHART 12 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WHITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 

1344 



County 


1942 


1943 


Coiinty Average 


23.3 


23.0 


Baltimore 


f 


ox . ij 


Frederlclc 


22.9 


2Z,7 




27 .2 


25.0 


Washington 


24.1 


23.4 


Ann p. Arunclel 


25.9 


23.5 


Calvert 


20.7 


21.3 


Prince George* 8 


23.3 


22.6 




23.9 


23. 3 


Cecil 


20.4 


21.0 


Talbot 


20.0 


19.7 


Wicomico 


22.3 


21.8 


Harford 


21.6 


21.1 


Dorchester 


20.6 


19.8 


Howard 


21.3 


19.6 


St. Mary»B 


20.5 


20.4 


Charles 


19.8 


18.6 


Carroll 


21.3 


20.6 


Caroline 


19.3 


19.5 


Kent 


20.5 


19.6 


Worcester 


19.8 


20.8 


Montgomery 


20.2 


21.2 


Queen Aime's 


17.4 


17.1 


Somerset 


20.3 


19.1 


Baltimore City t 


23.4 


22.2 


State Average 


23.4 


22.8 




t Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 25.2 in 1944. 24.9 in 1943 and 25.0 in 1942. and for vocational schools: 14.9 in 1944 
15.0 in 1943 and 16.2 in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 225. 



74 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 13 



AVERAG5 NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHEP AND PRINCIPAL 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (GRADES 1-7 OR 8) 




Balto.Cityt 36.3 

State „ 
Average 36.3 



36.5 
36.4 EB 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College. 

t Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior hi-gh 
schools: 27.6 in 1944. 27.4 in 1943 and 28.5 in 1942. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 228. 



Average Number of Colored Pupils Belonging per Teacher 75 



CHART 14 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 



County 
County Average 
Kent 

Baltimore* 

Queen Anne*s 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel 

Charles 

Somerset 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Calvert 

Howard 

flarford 

St. Mary's 

Cecil 

Talbot 

Caroline 
Prince George's 
Washington 
Allegany 

Baltimore Oityt 
State Average 




* In 1942 included classes for first three years, in 1943 and 1944 for four years. 

t Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 27.6 in 1944, 27.4 in 1943 and 28.5 in 1942; and vocational schools: 14.8 in 1944, 
14.4 in 1943 and 17.0 in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 229. 



76 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 67 



Average Number of Pupils Belonging Per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1944 



Z ISAIi 


Average Number Belonging Per 
County White Teacher and 
Principal in 


Average Number Belonging Per 
County Colored Teacher and 
Principal in 




15? 1 ajTt on i" n v 


High 


Am An t^o T*v 


jaigu 










Schools 




31.7 


20.0 


38.3 


15.2 




31.5 


19.8 


85.9 


14.8 




32.1 


20.1 


85.7 


16.8 




82.0 


20.3 


84.6 


19.0 




32.3 


20.4 


34.0 


19.9 


1 09fi 


32.8 


21.0 


33.7 


21.5 




32.9 


21.6 


33.3 


23.1 




33.6 


21.6 


33.0 


25.0 




84.0 


21.9 


83.3 


25.2 




84.9 


22.3 


34.0 


25.0 


1933 


36.2 


24.4 


34.9 


26.7 


1934 


36.1 


24.8 


35.0 


26.3 




36.1 


24.7 


34.0 


26.5 


35.8 


25.1 


33.2 


29.8 




35.4 


24.9 


33.3 


80.7 




35.2 


24.0 


33.7 


29.6 




35.6 


24.2 


34.9 


28.0 


1940 


35.5 


24.5 


85.3 


27.5 




35.8 


24.1 


85.8 


27.2 




36.0 


23.3 


36.3 


25.5 


1943 


36.8 


23.0 


36.3 


25.4 


1944 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 68 — Average Annual Salary Per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1944 





Average Salary Per County 


Average Salary Per County 




■ White Teacher and 


Colored Teacher and 




Principal in 


Principal in 


Year 












Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 




$990 


$1,436 


$513 


$906 




1,030 


1,477 


532 


835 




1,057 


1,485 


546 


808 




1,103 


1,517 


563 


891 


1927 


1,12b 


1,534 


586 


908 




1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 




1,184 


1,557 


621 


879 




1,199 


1,550 


635 


874 




1,217 


1,559 


643 


882 


1932 


1,230 


1,571 


653 


856 


1933 


1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1934 


1,122 


1,394 


595 


784 


1935 


1,135 


1,398 


602 


790 


1936 


1,202 


1,469 


636 


817 


1937 


1,220 


1,488 


653 


821 


1938 


1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1939 


1,314 


1,595 


846 


997 


1940 


1,360 


1,605 


906 


1,018 


1941 


1,387 


1,618 


993 


1,103 


1942 


1,427 


1,639 


1,124 


1,290 


1943 


tl , 539 


tl,735 


n,291 


tl,450 


1944 


*1,805 


*1,997 


*1,551 


*1,705 



t Salaries for 1943 include county bonizs, paid in 12 counties. 

* Salaries for 1944 include county bonus paid in 22 counties and State bonus in all counties. 



Average Number Belonging and Average Salary per Teacher 77 



CHART 15 

Average Salary Per County White and Colored Elementary and High 
School Teacher and Principal 1925-1944 



1800 



1.600 



1.Z0O 



800 





















f 








































h- 

1 

-h — 




















// 
/ / 

— 








CHOOU\ 










t 


4-i 


















r 


/ ; 
















/ 

/ 


1 

— I— 


; 












^ — 


/ 
/ 




1 . 
1 : 

1 : 






.« 






^\ 

\ 


/* 

/' 






1 : 
1 : 
1 / 


















/ 

/ 


















/ 

/ 

/ 

— / — 


— Z_ 






/ 

f 








\ 


— 


/ 

/ 
















\ 




















I', 












.-'CO-' 





























































1925 1927 1929 19J1 1933 1935 1937 1939 1941 1943 1945 



78 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Average Salary per Teacher; State and County Bonus, Total 79 
AND PER Teacher 



1 



I 



II 
I 



H 



2 3iH§iH3sS§ ^igSSasiSSaSi --^Bi 



FilllMMil'lIMIIMIIIf 



i 



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ft 



f 



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fg 



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80 1944 Report of Maryland State DepartxMENt of Education 



CHART 16 



AVERAGE SALARY PER ATilTE ELLtnLIvTAJtY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 



County 19?3 1943 1944 

County Average $1231 $1539 $1805 

Montgomery 
Washington 
Fredericlc 
Allegany 
Baltimore 

Prince George's 1231 
Carroll 
Cecil 

Anne Arundel 
Howard 
Queen Ajine's 
Wicomico 
Talbot 
Celvert 
Kent 

Worcester 
Dorchester 
Harford 
Somerset 
Charles 
Caroline 
Garrett 
St. Mary's 

Baltimore Cityt 1701 
State Average 1405 



Basic 
Salary 




t Data for elementary schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high schools: $2,577 in 1944, $2,187 in 1943, and $1,897 in 1933. 
For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 224. 



Average Salary per White Elementary and High School Teacher 81 



CHART 17 



AVERAGE SALARY PER WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 
1944 Average Salary Per 
County Prin- Teach- Prln. and 
cipal 

Co. Av 




BaxTt. *3526 t2966 
City 

State 3093 2149 
Average 



Data for senior high schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes following corresponding 
figures for junior high and vocational schools : 

• 1944 per principal: junior high $3,868; vocational $3,611. 

t 1944 per teacher: junior high $2,531; vocational $2,489. 

t 1944 per principal and teacher: junior high $2,577; vocational $2,569. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 2?.?>. 



82 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department op Education 



CHART 18 



AVERAGE SALARY PEP COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 



County 



1933 1943 1944 



Co. Average t 657 $1291 tl551 

Montgomery 641 1758 1959 

Allegany 1223 1509 1750 

Anne Arundel 703 1362 1684 

Washington 907 1488 1578 

Cecil 726 1301 1617 

Harford 703 1251 1603 

Baltimore 1139 1516 1601 

Howard 558 1188 1567 

Pr. George's 744 1316 1553 

Queen Anne's 561 1129 1515 

Caroline 534 1190 1499 

Frederick 590 1216 147 6 

Calvert 593 1155 1453 

Charles 578 U99 1428 

Wicomico 586 1236 1416 

Somerset 539 1192 1415 

Kent 582 1112 1415 

Carroll 587 1235 1414 

Dorchester 541 1128 1414 

Talbot 562 1114 1397 

Worcester 559 1077 1383 

St. Mary's 570 1122 1356 

Balto. Cityt 1614 
State Average 1056 



Basic 
Salary 



County 
Bonus 



State 
Bonus 



1,640 


W///M. 


1,413 




1.357 




1,345 


mmmm v/m 




1 1,181 
1 1.087. ■ 


mmam wm 




.1,18% - 


im\ 


i 1,188 


rm\ 


1,075 - 


my/////\ 


■ITT— 


mfi\ 


1.165 


ikI 


1.150 


wmm 


1.118 ^ . 






t Data for elementary schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high schools: $2,312 in 1944, $1,939 in 1943, and $1,996 in 1933. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 228. 



Average Salary per Colored Elementary and High School Teacher 83 



CHART 19 



AVERAGE SALAEy PER COLORED HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 



County 



1944 Average Salary Per 
Prin- Teach- Prln, and 
cipal er Teacher 



Basic 
Salaiy 




Data for senior high schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high and vocational schools : 

♦ 1944 per pri-ncipal : junior high $3,410; vocational $4,335. 
t 1944 per teacher: junior high $2,269; vocational $2,536. 
t 1944 per principal and teacher: junior high $2,312 ; vocational $2,598. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 229. 



84 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 20 



County 

Co. Average 

Montgomery 

Washington 

Eeltlmore 

Allegany 

Carroll 

Frederl ck 

Anne Arundel 

Pr. George's 

Ceoil 

Howard 

Harford 

Queen Anne's 

Wioomlco 

Kent 

Telbot 

Ceroline 

Dorchester 

V/orcester 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Charles 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Balto. City 
State Average 



AVERAGE SALARY PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
1942 1943 1944 
tl452 11566 11828 



Basic I 1 

Salary ' ' 



County 
Bonus 



State 
Bonus 



1925 2105 [ 

1646 1938 

1845 1906| 

1544 1894] 

1511 1832 1 

1514 1829 1 

1515 1818 1 
1530 1803 
1505 1795 1 
1417 1791 1 
1432 17 60 1 
1408 1750 
1474 16841 
1351 1583 
1395 167 
1380 166 
1377 166 
1343 164 
1373 164 
1359 152 
1386 162 
1312 160' 



1653 
1535 
1667 
1496 
1452 
1461 
1424 
1332 
1419 
1321 
1369 
1360 
1323 
1359 
1339 
1335 
1330 
1289 
1377 
1251 
1294 
1226 
1233 1253 152 

2085 2091 240; 
1707 1775 205 



1,793 








1.512 




BEOii^HHHilH WM 


1.464 


■■■■1 




1.448 V 








1.448 









3 1.409 


















W////\ 


1 1.291 ^ 





Average Salary per Teacher; Elementary Schools by Size 85 

OF Staff 



TABLE 71 

Number of County Schools Giving Instruction in Grades 1-7 (8) Having 
Following Number of Teachers and Principals, School Year, 1943-44 















mor 


ert 


line 






les 




_> 


o 




'o 




"a 




c3 




(V 




m 


O 


O 


U 


O 


U 

















o 


V, 
« 


<n 




a 




a< 

E 


o 


OQ 

C3 


52 


o 
w 







Schools for Whitk Pupils 



Total 


557 


42 


26 


42 


6 


9 


21 


22 


8 


27 


29 


51 


39 


10 


"12 


41 


47 


15 


16 


13 


12 


45 


15 


10 




a 














t 


































1.0- 1.4 


°130 


t7 
3 










115 


10 


1 


15 


1 


32 
8 


15 


2 


J3 


J6 


4 


6 


°5 


6 


t4 


t6 


2 




1.5- 2.4 


*°99 


4 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


1 


5 


7 


10 


1 


5 


3 


*6 


3 


8 


1 


°3 


11 


2 


"3 


2.6- 3.4 


42 


2 


3 


4 








1 




1 


3 


4 


2 




2 


4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


3 


3.5- 4.4 


48 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 




i 


2 


5 


3 


1 


i 




2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


7 


3 


4.5- 5.4 


31 


1 


3 


3 




1 


1 


i 


4 




2 


1 


2 


•1 




2 


4 










2 


2 


i 


5.5- 6.4 


39 


5 


2 


7 




2 


3 






2 


2 




3 


2 


1 




6 






1 


1 


1 




1 


6.5- 7.4 


34 


5 


3 


1 


i 


1 


3 


2 




1 


2 


2 


2 


1 




i 


4 


i 


i 


1 




2 






7.5- 8.4 


21 


1 


1 


3 






1 


1 






2 




2 




i 


4 


3 






1 








i 


8.5- 9.4 : 


22 


4 


2 


4 




i 


1 


1 




i 


2 






i 




1 


3 










1 






9.5-10.4 


16 


1 




1 




2 








1 


i 






2 


4 












'3 




10.5-11.4 


14 


1 


i 


4 
























4 


2 












1 


i 


11.5-12.3 


7 


3 




1 


















1 






2 
















12.5-13.4 


4 


"i 










1 


















1 








1 








13.5-14.4 


5 


i 




























2 


1 










1 






14.5-15.4 


11 


1 


1 
















2 










4 


1 










2 






15.5-16.4 


4 






1 


















1 






1 












1 






16.5-17.4 


5 
















1 










i 






1 










2 






17.5-18.4 


8 




2 


1 






1 


1 














2 










1 






18.5-19.4 


4 


3 


























1 
















19.6-20.4 


2 


1 






























1 
















20.6 or more 


12 


1 




6 
























1 












4 




















































Schools for Colored Pupils 


Total 


291 


2 


38 


16 


17 


4 


6 


6 


19 


12 


9 




16 


8 


9 


20 


40 


13 


13 


11 


10 


1 


11 


10 




t§°° 
































§ 
















1.0- 1.4 


125 


1 


14 


4 


11 




4 


3 


11 


°7 


4 




12 


2 


6 


3 


10 


11 


6 


3 


t7 




4 


°2 


1.5- 2.4 


107 




17 


8 


4 




1 


3 


6 


2 


4 




3 


5 


1 


10 


23 


1 


6 


5 




3 


5 


2.5- 3.4 


23 




1 




1 


3 


1 






1 










1 


4 


4 


1 


1 




'2 




3 




8.5- 4.4 


14 




4 


i 


1 
















1 


1 


2 


2 






i 








i 


4.5- 5.4 


13 


i 


1 


2 




"i 






2 


1 






1 


1 








1 








2 


6.5- 7.4 


4 




1 






























1 


1 








7.5- 8.4 


1 


















1 






























8.6- 9.4 


2 




1 




































1 






9.5-10.4 


1 






























1 














11.5-12.4 


1 












































1 





















































t Includes a school having grades 1-4 with one teacher. 
t Includes two schools having grades 1-4 with one teacher, 
il Includes three schools having grades 1-4 with one teacher. 
° Includes a school teaching only one or two grades. 

§ Excludes one school discontinued in December when pupils were sent to Bowie Demonstration 
School. 

* Includes a four-teacher school open only part of the year, in which the teaching staff on a 
full time basis, totalled two. 

a Includes eleven one-teacher schools teaching grades 1-4. 



8G 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 72 



Decrease in Teachers Employed in County One-Teacher Schools,* 1920-1944 



School Year 
Ending 
June 30 


County White Elementary Teachers 


Colored Elementary Teachers 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 




2,992 


1,171 


39.1 


683 


422 


61.8 




3,037 


1,149 


37.8 


694 


408 


58.8 




3,054 


1,124 


36 . 8 


708 


406 


57.3 




3,063 


1,093 


35.7 


712 


403 


56.6 




3,065 


1,055 


34.4 


728 


395 


54.4 




3,047 


1 ,005 


33.0 


721 


397 


55.1 




3,067 


956 


31.2 


728 


394 


54.1 




3,088 


oyo 


9Q 1 


725 


382 


52.7 




3,070 


823 


26.8 


734 


378 


51.5 




3,078 


739 


24.0 


734 


372 


50.7 




3,050 


663 


21.7 


733 


363 


49.5 




3,049 


586 


19.2 


739 


353 


47.7 




3,022 


489 


16.2 


727 


344 


47.3 


1933 


2,954 


407 


13.8 


718 


334 


46.5 


1934 


2,947 


377 


12.8 


708 


331 


46.7 


1935 


2,941 


365 


12.4 


714 


318 


44.5 


1936 


2,949 


342 


11.6 


709 


309 


43.6 


1937 


2,972 


324 


10.9 


697 


293 


42.0 


1938 


2,965 


289 


9.7 


677 


271 


40.0 




2,946 


260 


8.8 


658 


232 


35.3 


1940 


2,944 


209 


7.1 


644 


198 


30.7 


1941 


2,921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 



TABLE 73 



Number and Percent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* Elementary 
Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Schools For White 




Schools for Colored 




Pupils 








Pupils 




Teachers in 


Pupils in 




Teachers in 


Pupils in 


One-Teacher 


One-Teacher 


County 


One-Teacher 


One-Teacher 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


Schools 


Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 




Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 


ber 


cent 


ber 


cent 




ber 


cent 


ber 


cent 


117.8 


4.0 


2,690 


2.5 


Total and Average . . 


121.4 


20.2 


3,838 


17.7 










Caroline 


















Washington 


















Worcester 


l!6 


4!6 


36 


3!6 










Montgomery 


3.0 


6.2 


122 


7.4 












4.0 


9.4 


165 


8.4 


l!6 


'.6 


is 


'.S 




3.0 


10.3 


67 


6.2 


4.0 


1.2 


73 


.7 


Prince George's 


10.4 


12.1 


293 


10.1 


4.0 


1.2 


106 


.9 


Howard 


2.0 


12.7 


66 


11.9 


2.0 


1.7 


27 


.6 




4.0 


12.9 


106 


10. a 


5.0 


1.8 


139 


1.4 


Allegany 


1.0 


17.2 


29 


17.1 


6.0 


1.9 


136 


1.3 


Anne Arundel 


14.0 


17.3 


457 


16.1 


1.0 


2.3 


26 


1.6 


Frederick 


4.0 


21.1 


107 


16.7 


2.0 


2.7 


55 


2.1 


Dorchester 


6.0 


22.6 


239 


23. » 


1.0 


2.9 


22 


2.2 


Talbot 


5.0 


25.0 


138 


18.7 


2.0 


3.5 


59 


2.8 


St. Mary's 


6.0 


28.6 


176 


27.1 


3.0 


7.4 


38 


2.8 


Cecil 


3.0 


33.3 


86 


27.2 


9.0 


10.3 


247 


7.7 


Charles 


11.0 


33.4 


434 


32.0 


15.0 


11.6 


387 


9.0 


Kent 


6.0 


40.0 


185 


33.2 


4.0 


13.0 


95 


10.9 


Calvert 


11.0 


42.3 


422 


40. a 


6.0 


15.0 


131 


9.4 


Carroll 


4.0 


44.0 


88 


36. ft 


6.0 


16.7 


143 


12.5 




12.0 


52.2 


332 


45.7 


15.0 


23.4 


306 


14.9 


Queen Anne's 


11.0 


68.8 


290 


59.4 


31.8 


31.4 


682 


21.3 











County 



Total and Average 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Carroll 

Washington 

Allegany 

Charles 

Wicomico 

Kent 

Howard 

Talbot 

Cecil 

Harford 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Queen Anne's 

Dorchester 

Garrett 



♦ Schools having a one-teacher organization, i. e. grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



County One-Teacher Schools; Public High Schools 



87 



TABLE 74 

Number of Public High Schools, Year Ending July 31, 1944 



Public High Schools for 



Y EAR AND 

County 


White Pupils 


Colored Pupils 


Total 


Group 


Total 


Group 


°1 


OO T 

Z or Jr. 


1 


2 


1 Qon 


82 


*69 


Tl3 


4 




t4 




148 


*130 


tl8 


16 


ii 


5 


1 Q1(\ 


152 


142 


alO 


25 


17 


8 




150 


136 


bl4 


28 


25 


3 




149 


133 


cl6 


33 


31 


a2 




149 


132 


dl7 


33 


31 


a2 




148 


131 


dl7 


33 


31 


a2 


1943 


144 


128 


dl6 


32 


30 


a2 


1944 


143 


127 


dl6 


32 


30 


a2 




10 


8 


2 


1 


1 






5 


4 


al 


1 


1 






11 


6 


t5 


3 


3 




Calvert 


1 


1 




1 


1 






5 


5 




1 


1 




Carroll 


9 


8 


1 


1 


1 




Cecil 


8 


8 




1 


1 






5 


5 




2 


2 






6 


6 




1 


1 






7 


7 




1 


1 






5 


5 












8 


8 




'2 


"2 




Howard 


4 


4 




1 


1 




Kent 


4 


4 




1 


1 






12 


7 


'5 


1 


1 




Prince George's 


11 


11 




3 


3 




<3ueen Anne's 


5 


5 




1 


1 






2 


2 




2 


2 






4 


4 




2 


2 




Talbot 


3 


3 




1 


1 




Washington 


8 


6 


ex2 


1 


1 






6 


6 




1 


1 






4 


4 




3 


1 


a2 




21 


§7 


xl4 


4 


§2 


x2 


Jiintire State 


164 


134 


30 


36 


32 


4 



° First group schools have as a minimum an enrollment of 30, an attendance of 25, and two 
teacners. They give a four-year course. Second group schools have as a minimum an enrollment 
of 15, an atteniance of 12. They give a one-or-two-year course. Junior high schools have the 
higher elementary grades (7 in the 7 grade counties and 7-8 in the 8 grade counties) and the first, or 
first and second years of high school (8 or 8-9 in the 11 grade counties and 9 in .the 12 grade counties). 

* Includes the group classified as group 1 and group 2, prior to 1928. 

t Classified as group 3 prior to 1928. 

a Second group schools only. 

b Includes 7 junior high schools. 

c Includes 10 junior high schools. 

d Includes 11 junior high schools. 

e Excludes one junior high school with grades 7 and 8 eight only. 

X Includes 3 second group schools which in addition to grade 7 give a one-year course only, and 
2 junior high schools which give a two-year course. 

i Includes two junior-senior high schools with grades 7-12 inclusive. 
X Junior high schools having grades 7 to 9 inclusive. 
For individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



88 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 75 



Size of Teaching Staff in Last Four Years of Maryland County White 
High Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Number 

OF 

Teachers 


1 Total No. 
1 Schools 


1 Allegany || 


1 Anne Arundel 1 1 


1 Baltimore || 


1 Calvert || 


Caroline | 


1 Carroll || 


1 Cecil II 


1 Charles i 


Dorchester || 


Frederick || 


1 Garrett || 


i Harford |1 


Howard || 


Kent II 


Montgomery || 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's || 


St. Mary's || 


Somerset 1 1 


Talbot II 


Washington || 


Wicomico || 


Worcester || 


Total 


143 


10 


5 


11 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


5 


8 


4 


4 


12 


11 


5 


2 


4 


3 


8 


6 


4 




First Group High Schools 


2 


5 
7 

19 

10 
9 

10 
7 

10 
8 
7 
6 
2 
3 
2 
2 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

5 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 














1 


i 

2 


1 
2 
1 










1 










1 






1 
1 
2 
1 


i 


3 


1 
1 
1 






















1 






4 








1 


1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


2 
1 
1 


i 


i 

2 


1 

2 
2 


i 


2 


1 
1 


4 




1 


5 








6 


1 
1 






1 










1 

2 


7 












2 
1 
1 


1 




1 




1 






8 






1 

2 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


9 






1 




1 








1 


'2 

2 


1 






1 


1 




2 
1 


10 




1 
1 




11 








1 












1 
1 




i 


1 
1 








12 


1 
1 
















1 






1 




13 




















1 








14 


























1 


2 
















15 


1 


































1 








16 




1 








1 
































20 
















1 
























22 






















1 
























24 


















1 




























26 
























1 
















27 






1 








































28 


























1 
















29 






1 


















































































33 






























1 
















35 


2 


1 


1 




































1 




36 
























1 














38 








































1 






39 




1 






































41 
















1 




























46 






1 












































































1 





Second Group and Junior High Schools 



1 


2 
2 
3 

2 

1 

4 

1 


i 
1 




2 
1 










































2 










































3 






1 


















1 

1 
1 
1 


















5 




1 






































6 








































7 














































10 




1 


1 


































2 






13 
























1 



























































For teaching stafiF in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



White High Schools by Size of Teaching Staff and Enrollment 89 



TABLE 76 



Size of Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland County White High 
Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Average Number 
Belonging 


Total No. 
Schools 


1 Allegany || 


1 Anne Arundel 1 1 


1 Baltimore || 


1 Calvert || 


1 Caroline 


Carroll || 


1 Cecil II 


I Charles 


Dorchester || 


Frederick 


1 Garrett | 


1 Harford || 


Howard | 


1 Kent II 


Montgomery || 


Prince George's || 


Queen Anne's || 


1 St. Mary's | 


Somerset 


Talbot 1 


Washington || 


Wicomico || 


1 Worcester || 


Total 


143 


10 


5 


11 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


5 


8 


4 


4 


12 


11 


5 


2 


4 


3 


8 


6 


4 




First Group High Schools 


26- 40 


4 
5 
16 
16 

lU 

12 
9 
9 
6 
6 
4 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
1 

1 

3 














1 


















1 








1 




1 




41- 50 














1 

2 

i 

1 


2 
2 

i 










1 
1 
1 








1 
1 


51- 75 


1 

2 








1 


i 

5 
1 


1 

2 
1 

2 


i 
1 
1 


2 
1 


2 
1 

o 




'2 

i 
1 


1 


2 
2 








2 
2 


1 


76- 100 








1 ni 1 OK 








1 
1 








1 

2 


126- 150 




2 














151- 175 






2 










i 

2 

1 


1 


1 

i 


"i 
1 


1 


176- 200 
















1 


1 




1 




2 


201- 225 










1 




1 
1 




226- 250 


i 




1 












1 




1 


i 


i 








1 


251- 275 


1 
























276- 300 
















1 














1 






301- 325 


1 


















1 










1 
1 










326- 350 










































351- 375 






































1 








376- 400 














1 
































476- 500 






1 








































501- 525 






1 










1 
























526- 550 
















1 




























576- 600 


1 












































601- 625 




























1 


2 
















626- 650 












































701- 725 


1 
1 
1 

. 3 






























1 


















751- 775 






























1 
















776- 800 










































1 




851- 875 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 




































1 


926- 950 


2 
1 

1 
1 
1 




































951- 975 












































1,076-1,100 
















1 




























1,101-1,125 






1 
1 
1 








































1,176-1,200 










































1,376-1,400 





















































































Second Group and Junior High Schools 



40. 
50. 
100. 



101- 125. 

126- 150. 

226- 250. 

376- 400. 



2 






1 




















































1 
1 
1 
1 


















1 






















































































































































2 






1 











































































For enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



90 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 77 

Mze of Teaching Staff and Size of Enrollment in County High Schools 
for Colored Pupils, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



No. of 


21 




<D 


























"qj 
be 


m 














Teachers 


"o 

o 




CJ 
























>» 
u 

0) 


o 


\ 


CO 






c 






Average 

No. 
Belonging 


1 Total No. 
HighSch 


Allegany 


Anne Aru 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


1 Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


1 Dorcheste 


1 Frederick 


Harford 


1 Howard 


Kent 


1 Montgom 


1 Prince Ge 


1 Queen An 


1 St. Mary' 


1 Somerset 


1 Talbot 


1 Washingti 


1 Wicomico 


1 Worcester 


All Schools. . 


*32 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 



Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Teaching Staff 



1 


tl 
t2 
4 
7 
5 
2 
4 
1 
2 
1 

1 

1 

1 












































tl 
tl 


2 


































1 










3 


i 




1 

2 
















1 
1 








1 








1 




4 






1 










1 










1 




5 


1 








1 




1 


1 


1 










6 








1 






1 
1 




















7 








1 








1 
























1 


8 
























1 








9 




























1 








1 








10 




























1 














12 


















1 


























16 








































1 




22 




1 

















































































Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Enrollment 



26-50 


t2 


51-75 


t6 


76-100 


2 


101-125. . . . 




126-150 




151-175. . . . 




176-200 




201-225 




226-250 




351-375 




376-400. . . . 




551-575 


1 



* Includes two second-group schools in Worcester County, 
t Includes one second-group school in Worcester County. 
For individual high schools in 1944, see Table XXIII, pages 230 to 235. 



County Colored High Schools by Size of Staff and Enrollment; 91 
Baltimore City Summer Schools for Pupils 



TABLE 78— Baltimore City Summer Schools, 1943 



Type of School 


No. 
of 
Schools 


Total 
Enrollment 


Net Roll at End 
of Term 


Percent 
of Net Roll 
Recommended 
for Promotion 
Taking 


No. 
of 

Princi- 
pals 
and 

Teach- 
ers 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Taking 


Re- 
view 
Work 


Ad- 
vance 
Work 


Re- 
view- 
Work 


Ad- 
vance 
Work 


White Schools 




















Secondary- 






















2 


1,005 


758 


1,616 


1,539 


77 


90.3 


98.5 


27 




1 


416 


332 


659 


659 




97.4 




10 




4 


563 


445 


688 


688 




97.5 




19 




1 


102 


170 


244 




'244 




166.6 


13 




1 


187 


81 


258 




258 




99.0 


10 


Total White 


9 


2,273 


1,786 


3,465 


2; 886 


579 






79 


Colored Schools 




















Secondary- 






















1 


66 


151 


217 


112 


79 


93.2 


100.0 


10 






146 


202 


294 


294 




93.2 




9 




3 


573 


839 


1,256 


1,256 




87.7 




20 




1 


98 


223 


277 


'277 




166.6 


12 


Total Colored .... 


5 


883 


1,415 


2,044 


1,662 


356 






51 


All Schools 




















1943 


14 


3,156 


3,201 


5,509 


4,548 


935 






130 


1942 


15 


3,597 


3,397 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 






147 


1941 


14 


3,261 


3,233 


5,728 


4,987 


741 






120 


1940 


14 


3,641 


3,347 


6,135 


5,370 


765 






127 


1939 


14 


3,644 


3,359 


6,208 


5,505 


703 






121 


1938 


14 


3,299 


3,350 


5,822 


4,917 


905 






128 


1937 


14 


2,905 


2,948 


5,142 


4,290 


852 






121 


1936 


14 


3,400 


3,028 


5,544 


4,963 


581 






122 


1935 


14 


4,150 


3,929 


7,015 


6,304 


711 






128 


1934 


15 


3,728 


3,472 


6,139 


5,324 


815 






120 


1932 


12 


3,644 


3,263 


6,081 


5,393 


688 






107 • 


1931 


16 


4,399 


4,088 


7,192 


6,354 


838 






154 



92 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Salary 
Expendi- 
tures 


$14,434.50 




°^ 




«D 




Eh 




C5 
CO 


iance 


centt 


57.4 


Atten< 


Aver. 
Night- 
ly 


1,739.8 


Average 
Nights 

in 
Session 


23.6 




d 




3,030 




Total 
nrollme 




2,451 




H 




U5 




eral 




«5 
t- 
I* 




Gen 




t> 
05 


ject 


ness 
ation 




1,042 


by Sub 






lO 

to 


oUment 


jtrial 
)rK 




CO 
U3 


Enr 


C 




00 




SDitnouoog 

9UI0H 




*885 




ejn^Jino 
-u3v 




«D 


County 


Grand Total 



Tj<t-iOCgcDO5i-IO>CD00e0-^00 00«OTH 

»Hc^jooT)<o-^eoiMa50i>ooot-w 

(MCOIOCOCOIO (N O tH lO -"t 1-1 r-l 



O «) 1-1 IN tH (M -iHCO -cOt- 



C10OOt-«5a>O(M00iH,-(t>OC0OO 



in ecuD in 00 o 1-1 00 o <o Tjt (N CT> 00 o 



00 U5;Dt-t-«DffOOOOOOOiH(NOOOO 



Tj< th lo in (M Tjt «r> o rH 00 CO i-i o in o 05 
00 CO o o t> (N CO IN 00 o oa i-l (N 

• r-( (N O5C0 



in T-l 1 



in 00 (N in t- oi a> T-i OS o t~ a> in t- OS 

«£> CO O O Tl< CO OS 1-1 CO CO 1-1 00 O iH tH r-l 

o eoiHiH CO t>co 



05 CO tH CO t> t~ t- iH • 05 05 1-1 -co • 

1-1 Oi CO CO OOi 

in 



t> 1-1 1* 1-1 in t> CO • r-l t- Tt< CO 00 0> -t-Oi 

00 eoot-Tfeoin • eo oo i-i o ?d i-i -ih 

0> r-li-l iH CO 



CO oirHcocot-t- • -inosoot-i 



in in 
«D in 



<3pq 



^^3 
„ -kJ I- 
4) O) O 



o o c 

C <^ fl 
M 0) g - 



2:^-5 o-S 2^*2 « 53 S o 



CD 00 00 1-1 CO in 

tH rji O CD in CO CO 
COCDrHCO TfCD 



in CO o CD 10 00 CO 



CO omcoi-nnrttcD 



Ot-OCDOOCO 



CD CDOOOlt-'^O 

■<* cocDco-«trHinco 

■«4< CO 



Adult Education in Counties and Baltimore City 



93 



Descriptive Titles of Courses Offered in Maryland County Adult Education Program 
under Classifications of Agriculture, Home Economics, Trades and Industries, Business 
Education, General, Excluding Federal Program for Training in War Production, 1943-44 



Agriculture 

♦Poultry, Swine and Gardening 2 

Home Economics 

Nutrition 7 

Cooking and Serving 1 

♦Food Conservation 6 

Food and Clothing 1 

•Nutrition, Clothing and Canning 2 

Home Management 1 

♦Practical Nursing 2 

♦Clothing and Textiles 1 

Clothing 1 

Needlepoint 2 

Sewing 7 

°° "Clothing Renovation 12 

Trades and Industries 

"Woodworking 3 

Cabinet Making 2 

♦Sheet Metal 1 

tHeating 2 

Home Mechanics 5 

Training Course for Heating Firemen 2 



Business Education 

° "Typing 31 

"Typing and Stenography 10 

Stenography 7 

Bookkeeping 1 

Bookkeeping and Typing 1 

Speedscript 4 

Business English 1 

General 

Chemistry for Nurses 1 

Distributive Education 1 

Spanish 19 

Russian 1 

German 1 

"English 2 

Mathematics 1 

Parent Education 1 

♦Current Events' and Civics 1 

♦Community Singing 1 



♦ OflFered for colored adults. 

° Each ° indicates one class for colored adults. 

t Day class. 



TABLE 80— Baltimore City Adult Education 



Type of Work 


Enrollment 


White 


Colored 


Nights 

in 
Session 
1943-44 


1944 


1943 


1942 


1944 


1943 


1942 


Americanization 


807 


1,039 


1,670 








96 


Academic: 












Elementary 


41 


52 


74 


835 


945 


1,386 


96 


Secondary 


1,158 


1,402 


2,036 


472 


434 


730 


o 


Commercial 


672 


846 


1,518 


217 


224 


359 


96 


Vocational: 














Industrial* 


396 


737 


1,370 


90 


393 


521 


48 


Home Economics* 


119 


231 


379 


346 


307 


498 


48 


Parent Education 


1,288 


1,218 


1,906 


405 


473 


653 




Industrial Training! 


275 


587 


2,001 










National Defense or War 














Production Trainingt 


11,947 


17,270 


14.251 


3,806 


5,464 


1,753 




Informal Program 


527 


567 


1,466 


■ 48 



* Vocational courses are reimbursed from federal vocational Smith-Hughes or George-Deen 
funds. Persons taking them are employed at work related to the field in which the course is given. 

t Courses in industrial work are not reimbursed from federal funds. The students may be unem- 
ployed or working in fields other than industrial work. 

t Courses in training for war production paid for from federal funds given five nights a week, 
or 6 and 7 days a week over periods of six weeks, continuous throughout the year. 

° The junior high school academic and commercial classes met 96 nights while the senior high 
school academic and commercial classes met 127 nights. 



94 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 81 



Service Rendered Cases Referred for Vocational Rehabilitation in Maryland 
During the Year Ending June 30, 1944 













rSeing 








Total 


Ro- 


Being 


1 raming 


Prepared 


ourveyed, 


Uioseci 


County 








Completed, 


for 








cf 


tated 




Awaiting 


Employ- 


Ad- 


ucner 




Cases 






Jobs 


ment 


visement 


Services 


Total Counties . 


612 


97 


12 


40 


61 


894 


g 


Allegany 


108 


g 


3 


7 


g 


81 


2 


Anne Arundel . 


38 


9 




4 




23 




Baltimore 


86 


16 








57 




Calvert 


5 










5 




Caroline 


17 


Q 






3 


7 




Carroll 


14 


1 








13 




Cecil 


18 


8 




'2 


'2 


6 




Charles 


8 


1 








7 






20 


7 


"i 




*2 


8 






17 


5 






5 


g 




Garrett 


14 


^ 






2 


9 




Harford 


13 


4 








7 




Howard 


16 


4 








12 




Kent 


14 


2 






6 


6 




Montgomery 


22 


1 


'2 


i 


1 


17 




Prince George's. 


60 


8 


1 


3 


7 


41 




Queen Anne 's . . . 


6 


1 






1 


4 




St. Mary's 


5 








1 


4 




Somerset 


13 


2 




"2 


1 


8 




Talbot 


7 


2 




1 




4 




Washington 


51 


5 




3 


'4 


38 




Wicomico 


49 


4 


1 


14 


4 


24 


2 


Worcester 


11 


1 






3 


7 




Baltimore City . . 


655 


258 


21 


40 


75 


234 


27 


Total State 1944 


1,267 


355 


33 


80 


136 


628 


35 


1943 


953 


358 


63 


47 


129 


327 


29 


1942 


538 


209 


35 


25 


102 


129 


38 


1941 


443 


111 


65 


17 


141 


75 


34 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

The great increase in the number of disabled citizens of 
Maryland who have been given vocational rehabilitation service 
is evident from the statistics since 1941. 

It was in October 1943 that legislation by the Congress made 
available funds to take over 100 percent of all operating, admin- 
istrative and guidance costs. Prior to that time the Federal 
government had matched funds by the State government for 
these purposes. In addition, Federal funds are available to match 
State funds for case services to disabled civilians. By this re- 
cent Federal legislation the rehabilitation service has been ex- 
tended to the blind, tuberculous, cardiac and other groups of 
physically handicapped individuals not previously considered 
eligible and also to the mentally handicapped. In addition, phys- 
ical restoration and maintenance have been included among the 
services available to all groups. 



Vocational Rehabilitation ; Vocational Training for War 95 
Production 

The staff has been increased so that eventually the number 
of individuals v^ho may receive vocational training and medical 
care will be numbered in the thousands rather than in the hun- 
dreds. Many of these persons will be able to work in industry, 
business or agriculture provided they can be given vocational 
guidance and selective placement. Some will have to seek em- 
ployment in sheltered environments. 

The number of disabled who can be reached by this service 
will be in direct proportion to the State funds provided for case 
service. The work with the blind, tuberculous and mentally 
handicapped has only begun. 

VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR WAR AND FOOD PRODUCTION 
Training for War Production 

In the program for Vocational Training for War Produc- 
tion Workers organized in July 1940 under the direction of the 
State Department of Education with Federal Funds, a total 
county and City enrollment of 143,950 was given preemployment 
and supplementary courses up to June 30, 1944. In these four 
years the enrollments were 24,000, 48,500, 41,200 and 30,351, 
respectively. In 1943-44 there were 24,103 enrolled in supple- 
mentary classes which had as their primary purpose the upgrad- 
ing of skills, techniques and special knowledge of workers on the 
job, while 6,248 were given preemployment courses. For the year 
1943-44, the proportion of women enrolled was 25 percent and 
of negroes 9 percent. 

During the past year many courses were organized to meet 
the requirements of employers for in-plant training, while other 
courses were given in public school vocational shops to trainees 
who were paid w^ages while taking the courses to prepare for 
specific employment in a particular plant or for a particular 
service. Specialized courses have also been given by the Army 
and Navy. 

Preemployment training was organized for 466 high school 
seniors in 1943-44 who spent half of their time in regular class- 
work and the other half in the vocational shop center of the war 
production training program. Equipment valued at $536,000 
has been placed in 40 shops. This will be available for use in 
the regular vocational education program in the high and vo- 
cational schools of the counties and City of Baltimore. 

Training for foremen, supervisors, safety and conference 
leaders formerly offered in the regular vocational trade exten- 
sion and evening classes has been expanded and carried on suc- 
cessfully as part of the emergency program. Training for women 
industrial counselors is being given during the current year. 



96 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 82 

Vocational Training for War Production, Cumulative Enrollment and 
Expenditures® for Salaries, Supplies, Operation, Maintenance 
and Equipment, July 1, 1943 to June 30, 1944 



County 



Cumulative 
Enrollment 

FOR 





Pre- 
Employ- 

ment 
C ourses 


Sup- 
plement- 
ary 
Courses 


Out 
of 
School 
I ouin 


Total Counties I 








1941* 


2,813 


7,254 


2,587 


1942* 


7,110 


15,654 


5,109 


1943 


5,513 


8,130 


5,605 


1944 


1,372 


7.091 


13 , 746 




111 


184 


1,202 


Anne Arundel 


434 


50 


1,257 


Baltimore 


38 


2,938 


911 


Calvert 






374 


Caroline 






801 


Carroll 


"l6 


" '9i 


499 


Cecil 




549 








78 


'477 


Dorchester 




59 


589 


Frederick 


" '36 


72 


1,301 




41 




1,308 


Harford 


98 


'888 


519 






. ... 


251 


Kent 


"53 




998 


Montgomery 


363 


107 


733 


Prince George's. . . . 


36 


1,332 


364 


Queen Anne's 






54 


St. Mary's 








Somerset 






'433 


Talbot 






305 


Washington 


152 


686 


1,200 


Wicomico 




56 


84 


Worcester 






86 


Baltimore City 


4,876 


16,563 




State Office 








Training within 








Industry Courses. 




449 




FoUow-up Survey . . 








Total State: 








1941 


8,236 


15,669 


2,587 


1942 


20,772 


27,705 


5,109 


1943 


20,982 


20,235 


5,605 


1944 


6,248 


24,103 


13,746 



Expenditures" for 



Salaries, Supplies, Operation 
and Maintenance for 



"Vocational 
Educational 
Defense 
Training 



Out 
of 

School 
Youth 



Equipment 



Total 



$133,501.73 
313,776.44 
347,501.23 
173,140.28 

$12,882.08 
25,946.89 
42,686.12 



173.59 
934,00 
505.11 
120.00 
528.57 
598.90 



2 
2 

20,130.16 

2 ',296 '.80 
18,837.21 
21,116.19 



18,994.66 
390.00 



439,932.27 
19,393.54 

1 , 584 . 00 
4,571.59 



$335,855.65 
714,494.97 
1,012,696.78 
638,621.68 



$68,613.60 
96,617.40 
116,691.34 
102,053.01 

$10,865.23 
8,296.92 
6,017.74 
3,222.36 
5,036.00 
6,380.33 



2,957.17 
3,459.77 
11,226.66 
6,522.45 
7,211.44 
2,854.15 
5,688.86 
3,228.38 
464.51 
624.82 

3; 270 '.66 
1,966.92 
11,323.34 
1,048.96 
387.00 



9,516.27 



$79 , 522 . 63 
103,151.20 
130,605.06 
111,569.28 



$34,606.84 
129,187.73 
115,942.28 
4,375.45 

$2,783.64 

■ "74". 66 



510.87 
66i;74 



174.87 



170.33 



9,668.77 
133,436.89 



$75,143.14 
184,978.06 
227,875.75 
47,481.11 



t$255,355.99 
t544,067.65 
580,134.85 
279,568.74 

$26,530.95 
34,243.81 
48,777.86 
3,222.36 
5,036.00 
8,553.92 
934.00 
4,973.15 
3,579.77 
14,416.97 
9,121.35 
27,341.60 
2,854.15 
7,985.66 
22,240.46 
21,580.70 
624.82 



3,270.00 
1,966.92 
30,488.33 
1,438.96 
387.00 

449,601.04 
62,346.70 

1,584.00 
4,571.59 



t$512,151.23 
n, 008, 287. 48 
1,371,177.69 
797,672.07 



* Excludes enrollment in National Youth Administration program of 1,353 in 1941 and 517 in 1942. 

t Includes expenditure for National Youth Administration program of $18,633.82 in 1941. and $4,486.08 in 1942. 

° Includes payments made after July 1 for obligations incurred before July 1. 

t Includes payments for equipment for the counties made by the State Office. 



Vocational Training for War and Food Production 



97 



Food Production War Training 

There were 9,853 enrolled in the Food Production War 
Training program in 1943-44. This included farm machinery 
courses in which 81,189 pieces of equipment were repaired; and 
food preservation and canning classes in which approximately 
260,000 No. 2 cans were processed. 

There were 3,893 out-of-school county youths given train- 
ing in 1943-44 as potential workers for war industries. 

Training for the Handicapped 

Courses have been planned to cover a period of from six 
months to two years to meet the needs of veterans with ser- 
vice connected disabilities who are assigned through the local 
office of the Veterans' Administration. These trainees receive 
pay while in training in addition to other special allotments. 

Classes have also been organized to meet the needs of dis- 
abled veterans without service connected disabilities and for 
civilians disabled through industrial accidents or other causes 
who are referred by the Vocational Rehabilitation Service. The 
training of blind men and women in machine shops and small 
parts assembly has resulted in a number of successful placements. 

Training for Returned Servicemen 

Servicemen referred by the Veterans' Administration who 
desire vocational training for a definite trade may be given a 
choice of a wide field depending upon their previous education, 
pre-war, and war experiences. 

Summary Data Re War Training Programs in 1943-44 

Food Production War Training 

Vocational 

Training Farm Food 

for War Machin- Preacr- 

Production ery vation 

Workers 

Trainees enrolled, number 30,351 9,853 

Women enrolled, number 7,580 2,040 

Negroes enrolled, number 2,730 1,192 

Women enrolled, percent 25 21 

Negroes enrolled, percent 9 12 

Trainee hours, number 217,161 37,283 

Cost of instruction per trainee hour $ .222 $ .291 $ .340 

Cost of supervision per trainee hour $ .027 $ .096 

Average clock hours per course 80 30.2 17.7 

Average cost of instruction per 

enrollee $19.92 $ 8.79 $6.02 

Equipment purchases per trainee 

enrolled $ 4.42 ♦$ 5.43 

Total average investment per 

trainee served $24.34 $11.99 

'Including rental of spaoe 



98 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 21 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid in 23 Counties and 
Baltimore City*. 1920 to 1944 

Millions 
of Dollars 



6 



1 

































- 
























/ 




- 






















y 

^ 1 


1 

1 

< 1 












/'^ 












y" 










/ 

1 

1 

1 


























1 
1 
1 
1 

' '/ 


























> 








Am - z^ 




Its 












I 




- 










owe C.r 














1 

1 

1 

1 

1 





1920 1922 1924 1926 1928 1930 1932 1934 1936 1938 1940 1942 1944 194€ 



* Includes expenditures from City funds for training teachers in City training school (s), 
but excludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund for teachers. 

For 1944 data, see Tables 83 and 84 pages 99 and 101 and Tables XI and XIII, pages 217 
and 219. 



Expenditures for Schools by Year 



99 



TABLE 83 



School Current Expenses from State, Federal, and Local Funds and Capital 
Outlay by Boards of Education in the Counties and Baltimore City, 1924-1944 



Year 
Ending 
July 31 


Current Expense Disbursements 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total 


From State 
Funds 


From Federal 
Funds 


From Local 
Funds 


Total Counties 


1924 


6,475,803 


2,041,155 


t43,244 


4,391,404 


949,720 


1925 






t43 , 252 


*± , KJlJiJ , 




1926 


7,143,150 


2,212,857 


t48,'010 


4,882,283 


2,602,745 


1927 


7,517,720 


2,291,235 


t48,965 


5,177,529 


1,023,362 


1928 


7,787,298 


x°2,207,335 


t51,910 


5,528,053 


1,532,718 


1929 


8,164,657 


X "2, 279. 589 


t54,425 


5,830,643 


1,773,070 


1930 


8,456,414 


x2, 299, 3 80 


t69,779 


6,087,255 


2,450,144 


1931 


8,852,073 


2,323,767 


t78,755 


6,449,551 


2,172,088 


1932 


8,892,181 


2,661,382 


t77,470 


6,153,329 


1,650,065 


1933 


8,485,146 


2,531,668 


t78,343 


5,875,135 


688,497 


1934 


8,010,425 


3,622,840 


t67,903 


4,319,682 


1,132,433 


1935 


8,189,909 


3,665,763 


t75,727 


4,448,419 


1,590,879 


1936 


8,715,542 


3,580,265 


t84,854 


5,050,423 


2,000,321 


1937 


9,082,523 


3,583,329 


192,553 


5,406,641 


2,531,071 


1938 


9,893,912 


4,219,147 


tl44,854 


5,529,911 


1,576,434 


1939 


10,216,150 


4,300,033 


tl66,016 


5,750,101 


2,845,537 


1940 


10,752,978 


4,415,744 


tl66,215 


6,171,019 


2,773,778 


1941 


§11,108,701 


4,406,610 


§tl67,417 


6,534,674 


1,116,817 


1942 


§11,687,272 


4,828,593 


§tl85,069 


6,673,610 


1,483,259 


1943 


§12,185,970 


4,830,993 


§tl88,549 


7,166,428 


816,813 


1944 


§14,164,717 


6,376,332 


§tl83,768 


7,604,617 


423,538 



♦Baltimore City 



6,794,048 
7,237,993 
7,480,170 
7,878,719 
8,360,391 
8,767,395 
9,193,068 
9,666,385 

' 9,415,054 
8,388,125 
7,992,222 
8,502,074 
8,744,298 
9,031,032 
9,347,234 
9,747,952 
9,845,208 

§10,238,979 

§10,301,657 
§9,741,713 

§11,012,413 



1,046,561 
1,024,179 
1,034,372 
1,066,385 
x999,753 
xl, 017, 153 
x976,083 
932,251 
974,431 
1,072,738 
948,586 
954,383 
946,396 
943,073 
941,150 
950,005 
953,033 
937,901 
930,151 
921,520 
2,265,683 



14,551 
18,301 
22,522 
20,112 
17,240 
20,338 
18,980 
13,773 
11,131 
10,663 
10,081 
25,913 
26,363 
22,536 
83,737 
55,923 
56,690 
§57,256 
§55,978 
§64,354 
§45,953 



5,732,936 
6,195,513 
6,423,276 
6,792,222 
7,343,398 
7,729,904 
8,198,005 
8,720,361 
8,429,492 
7,304,724 
7,033,555 
7,521,778 
7,771,539 
8,065,423 
8,322,347 
8,742,024 
8,835,485 
9,243,822 
9,315,528 
8,755,839 
8,700,777 



*Entire State 



1924 


13,269,851 


3,087,716 


57,795 


10,124,340 


6,286,609 


1925 


13,981,008 


3,154,697 


61,553 


10,764,758 


5,752,557 


1926 


14,623,320 


3,247,229 


70,532 


11,305,559 


6,087,512 


1927 


15,396,448 


3,357,620 


69,077 


11,969,751 


5,223,400 


1928 


16,147,689 


x3, 207, 088 


69,150 


12,871,451 


3,430,589 


1929 


16,932,052 


x3, 296, 742 


74,76a 


13,560,547 


2,406,702 


1930 


17,649,482 


x3, 275, 463 


88,759 


14,285,260 


3,958,822 


1931 


18,518,458 


3,256,018 


92,528 


15,169,912 


5,830,134 


1932 


18,307,235 


3,635,813 


88,601 


14,582,821 


4,328,987 


1933 


16,873,271 


3,604,406 


89,006 


13,179,859 


1,956,656 


1934 


16,002,647 


4,571,426 


77,984 


11,353,237 


2,219,784 


1935 


16,691,983 


4,620,146 


101,640 


11,970,197 


2,233,070 


1936 


17,459,840 


4,526,661 


111,217 


12,821,962 


2,223,990 


1937 


18,113,555 


4,526,402 


115,089 


13 , 472 , 064 


3,687,819 


1938 


19,241,146 


5,160,297 


228,591 


13,852,258 


2,335,564 


1939 


19,964,102 


5,250,038 


221,939 


14,492,125 


2,876,322 


1940 


20,598,186 


5,368,777 


222,905 


15,006,504 


2.786,810 


1941 


§21,347,680 


5,344,511 


§224.673 


15.778.496 


1 , 262 , 309 


1942 


§21,988,929 


5,758,744 


§241,047 


15.989.138 


1,721,378 


1943 


§21,927,683 


5,752,513 


§252,903 


15,922.267 


834,802 


1944 


§25,177,130 


8,642,015 


§229,721 


16.305,394 


432,259 



* Includes expenditures from City funds for training of teachers in City training school(s), but 
excludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund. 

t Includes amounts received from the Federal Government toward salaries and expenses at 
Indian Head. 

X Excludes receipts from liquidation of Free School Fund. 
° Excludes $6,500 to be used by Charles County for school building purposes. 
§ Excludes expenditures for Vocational Training for War Production Workers, see Table 82 
page 97. 



100 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Coxinty 



CHART 22 

EERCENT OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1944 

milll State, Excluding Equalization Fund 
~j Equalization Fund 



Received from 



Federal Aid 

County Levy and Other Coxinty Sources 



Total 




Baltimore City 
Total State 



For basic data, see Table 84 and Tables X[-XI[I, pages 217 to 219. 



Source of School Funds 



101 



TABLE 84 



Percent of Current Expense Disbursements Received by County 
Boards of Education from State* and Federal* Funds 
for the Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

Total 
Disburse- | 
ments 

for 
Current 
Expensest 


Amount Received for Current j 
Expenses from | 


Percent of Current Expense 
Disbursements Receivea from 


State 
Aid*t 


Fed- 
eral 
Aid*t 


County 1 
Levy and | 
Other 
County 
Sources 


1 State Aid Excludmg 
Equalization Fund 

1 ■ 


State Equalization 
Fund 


Total State Aid 


Federal Aid 


County Levy and 
Other Sources 


Total Counties . 


$14,164,717 


$6,376,332 


$183,768 


$7,604,617 


31.2 


13.8 


45.0 


1.3 


53.7 




320,689 


220,574 


:42,230 


57,885 


32.2 


36.5 


68.7 


13.2 


18.1 


Garrett 


402,398 


298,846 


5,648 


97,904 


28.2 


46.1 


74.3 


1.4 


24.3 




275,350 


203,458 


1,689 


70,203 


35.4 


38.5 


73.9 


.6 


25.5 


Calvert 


176,416 


128,024 


3,063 


45,329 


32.1 


40.5 


72.6 


1.7 


25.7 


St. Mary's 


205,205 


144,125 


4,581 


56,499 


36.4 


23.9 


70.3 


2.2 


27.5 


Caroline 


'260,667 


168,915 


6,037 


85,715 


33.6 


31.2 


64.8 


2.3 


32.9 


Dorchester 


386,195 


228,757 


4,631 


152,807 


31.9 


27.4 


59.3 


1.2 


39.5 


Worcester 


299,829 


174,654 


1,648 


123,527 


35.1 


23.1 


58.2 


.5 


41.2 


Howard 


306,927 


174,466 


3,518 


128,943 


32.9 


24.0 


56.9 


1,1 


42.0 


Carroll 


577,384 


328,750 


4,436 


244.198 


31.5 


25.4 


56.9 


.8 


42.3 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1,032,140 


562,380 


9,027 


460,733 


30.0 


24.5 


54.5 


.9 


44.6 




449,129 


240,834 


1,621 


206,674 


33.4 


20.2 


53.6 


.4 


46.0 


Queen Anne's . . . 


235,128 


120,825 


3,425 


110,878 


31.7 19.7 


51.4 


1.6 


47.1 


Talbot 


247,158 


117,062 


3,378 


126,718 


33.4 


14.0 


47.4 


1.3 


51.3 


Kent 


212,959 


101,766 


1,047 


110,146 


31.5 


16.3 


47.8 


.5 


51.7 




723,295 


319,756 


5,491 


398,048 


32.8 


11.4 


44.2 


.8 


55.0 




1,324,854 


559,127 


16,495 


749,232 


28.7 


13.5 


42.2 


1.2 


56.6 


Prince George's. 


1,509,096 


608,315 


ll,686i 889.095 


1 30.4 


9.9 


40.3 


.8 


58.9 


Harford 


544,787 


196,552 


13,660 


334,575 


36.1 




36.1 


2.5 


61.4 


Washington 


995,885 


356,017 


21,367 


618,501 


30.5 


5.3 


35.8 


2.1 


62.1 


Baltimore 


1,661,810 


589,379 


5,124 


1,067,307 


35.5 




35.5 


.3 


64.2 


Cecil 


402,737 


135,315 


1,590 


265,832 


33.6 




33.6 


.4 


66.0 


Montgomery . . . . 


1,614,679 


398,435 


12,376 


1,203,868 


24.7 




24.7 


.8 


74.5 


Baltimore City . . 


°10,983,800 


°1, 662, 672 


45,953 


°9, 275, 175 


15.1 




15.1 


.4 


84.5 


Total State 


$25,148,517 


$8,039,004 


$229,721 


$16,879,792 


24.2 


7.8 


32.0 


.9 


67.1 



1 

* Includes State and Federal aid for 1943-44 received after June 30, 1944, but excludes Federa 
aid for Vocational Training for War Production Workers shown on page 97. 

t Excludes estimated State, Federal and County funds for public school health services expended 
by County and City health offices. See Table 137 page 194. 

t Includes $37,550.48 expended by Federal government toward salaries and expenses at 
Indian Head. 

° Excludes $941,942 for teachers in Baltimore City Retirement System of which $603,011 came 
from State funds and $338,931 from local funds; also excludes $28,613 . 13 for Coppin Teachers College. 
For detailed daU, see Tablet XI-XIII, pages 217 to 219. 



102 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 23 

How Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses was Used in 1943-44 in the 

Maryland Counties 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




EXCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




♦ Fixed charges and payments to adjoining counties. 

X Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties for 
services rendered to school children. The upper circle includes cost of transportation with 
auxiliary agencies (ll.T^*), while the lower circle excludes cost of transportation from auxiliary 
agencies (.8^). Expenditures from Federal funds for Vocational Training for War Pro- 
duction Workers are excluded. 

For basic data, see Tables XIII, XV and XVI, pages 219, 221 and 222. 



Percent Distribution of School Expenditures 103 



TABLE 85— Percent Distribution of School Expenditures By County School 
Boards for the Year Ending June 30, 1944 







Percent of Total Current Expense Funds Used for 




T3 




















Percent of Expenditures 
for Current Expenses 
and Capital Outlay Use 
for Capital Outlay 


County 


General Control 


Supervision 


Salaries of Teachers 


Books, Materials and 
Other Costs of 
Instruction 1 


Operation 


Maintenance 


Auxiliary Agencies* 


Fixed Charges and 
Payments to Ad- 
joining Counties 



♦Including Cost of Transportation 





2 


7 


1 


5 


68 


4 


3.4 


8.0 


3.4 


11.7 


.9 


2.9 


Allegany 


2 





2 





67 


1 


4.4 


9.6 


5.8 


8.4 


.7 


1.6 




3 


4 


1 


1 


67 


1 


4.6 


7.1 


3.4 


12.2 


1.1 


3.8 




2 


2 




3 


73 


3 


2.6 


8.5 


1.9 


9.5 


.7 


2.6 


Calvert 


5 





2 


9 


58 


3 


2.1 


6.5 


2.2 


22.3 


.7 


14.8 




3 


9 


1 


5 


63 


6 


2.8 


6.4 


2.3 


18.8 


.7 


.1 


Carroll 


2 


5 


1 


9 


67 


2 


2.4 


5.9 


2.2 


16.7 


1.2 


.7 


CecU 


2 


6 


i 


8 


68 


4 


3.8 


8.6 


1.7 


12.5 


.6 


.5 


Charles 


2 


7 


1 


5 


59 


3 


3.1 


10.6 


3.1 


19.0 


.7 


.9 




2 


9 


1 


4 


62 


9 


2.3 


9.1 


3.5 


17.1 


.8 






2 


3 


1 


1 


68 





3.1 


7.3 


1.8 


15.4 


1.0 


"".6 


Garrett 


3 


6 


1 


5 


60 


3 


2.6 


4.7 


1.8 


21.0 


4.5 


4.6 




2 


5 


1 


8 


74 


3 


2.4 


7.7 


3.4 


7.1 


.8 


.4 




3 


1 


1 


3 


65 





3.2 


6.7 


1.9 


18.2 


.6 


1.8 


Kent 


4 


1 


1 


6 


60 


8 


2.7 


9.0 


5.5 


15.6 


.7 


.8 




2 


4 




3 


70 


5 


4.4 


9.0 


5.2 


6.6 


.6 


8.7 


Prince George's 


2 





1 


3 


71 


3 


4.0 


9.0 


5.8 


6.0 


.6 


2.0 




4 





1 


8 


61 





2.8 


9.3 


2.5 


17.4 


1.2 




St. Mary's 


4 


3 


2 


5 


57 


9 


2.9 


5.5 


1.9 


23.7 


1.3 


' ■ '.8 




3 


5 


1 


7 


64 


8 


3.1 


6.7 


2.4 


17.4 


.4 


2.1 


Talbot 


3 


9 


1 


8 


65 





2.9 


6.9 


1.9 


16.7 


.9 


.8 




2 


2 


1 


7 


75 


4 


3.4 


6.8 


2.2 


7.6 


.7 


2.7 


Wicomico 


3 


2 


1 


1 


65 


9 


3.0 


7.2 


3.0 


14.9 


1.7 


4.8 


Worcester ' 


3 


1 




5 


63 


1 


2.2 


7.6 


2.4 


19.2 


.9 






2 


9 


1 


6 


76 


3 


3.5 


11.2 


2.2 


2.1 


t.2 


.1 




2 


8 


1 


5 


71 


8 


3.5 


9.4 


2.9 


7.5 


.6 


1.7 



♦Excluding Cost of Transportation 





3.0 


1.7 


76.8 


3.8 


9.0 


3.9 


.8 


1.0 


3.3 




2.1 


2.2 


72.9 


4.7 


10.4 


6.3 


.6 


.8 


1.7 




3.9 


1.3 


75.6 


5.1 


7.9 


3.9 


1.1 


1.2 


4.3 




2.4 


1.4 


80.5 


2.8 


9.4 


2.1 


.6 


.8 


2.9 




6.4 


3.7 


74.7 


2.8 


8.3 


2.8 


.4 


.9 


18.2 


Caroline 


4.8 


1.8 


78.2 


3.4 


7.8 


2.9 


.2 


.9 


.1 




2.9 


2.3 


80.1 


2.9 


7.1 


2.6 


.7 


1.4 


.8 


Cecil 


3.0 


2.0 


77.7 


4.3 


9.8 


2.0 


.5 


.7 


.6 




3.4 


1.8 


72.6 


3.9 


12.9 


3.8 


.8 


.8 


1.1 




3.5 


1.7 


75.4 


2.8 


10.9 


4.1 


.7 


.9 






2.8 


1.3 


80.1 


8.6 


8.6 


2.1 


.3 


1.2 


' ' .8 


Garrett 


4.4 


1.9 


75.5 


3.3 


5.9 


2.3 


1.1 


5.6 


5.7 


Harford 


2.6 


1.9 


79.5 


2.5 


8.3 


3.7 


.6 


.9 


.4 


Howard 


3.8 


1.6 


79.2 


3.9 


8.1 


2.3 


.4 


.7 


2.2 




4.8 


1.8 


71.7 


3.2 


10.7 


6.5 


.5 


.8 


.9 




2.5 


1.4 


74.7 


4.6 


9.6 


5.5 


1.1 


.6 


9.1 


Prince George's 


2.1 


1.3 


74.6 


4.2 


9.5 


6.0 


1.6 


.7 


2.0 




4.8 


2.1 


73.6 


3.4 


11.2 


3.0 


.4 


1.5 






5.6 


3.3 


75.5 


3.7 


7.1 


2.5 


.6 


1.7 


"i'.i 




4.2 


2.1 


78.2 


3.8 


8.0 


2.9 


.4 


.4 


2.5 




4.6 


2.1 


77.6 


3.4 


8.3 


2.3 


.6 


1.1 


1.0 




2.4 


1.8 


81.4 


3.7 


7.3 


2.4 


.2 


.8 


2.9 




3.7 


1.3 


76.9 


3.4 


8.5 


3.5 


.8 


1.9 


5.6 


Worcester 


3.8 


1.8 


77.8 


2.7 


9.4 


2.9 


.4 


1.2 




Baltimore City 


3.0 


1.5 


76.6 


3.5 


11.2 


2.2 


1.8 


t.2 


.1 


State Average 


3.0 


1.6 


76.7 


3.7 


10.0 


3.1 


1.3 


.6 


1.8 



* Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties and Baltimore 
City for services rendered to school children. "The upper table includes cost of transportation in aux- 
iliary agencies and the lower table excludes cost of transportation. Expenditures from Federal 
funds for Vocational Training for War Production are excluded. 

t Baltimore City expenditures for the Retirement System are excluded. 



104 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department op Education 



TABLE 86 

Cost Per Pupil Belonging for General Control 



1941 


1942 


1944 


$1,98 


$2.24 


$2.67 


1.74 


1.66 


2.44 


1.94 


2.02 


2.30 


1.91 


1.99 


2.28 


2.01 


1.98 


2.22 


1.61 


1.63 


2.02 


1.69 


1.81 


1.89 


1.47 


1.48 


1.81 


1.38 


1.30 


1.79 


1.33 


1.47 


1.67 


1.34 


1.41 


1.33 


2.99 


3.14 


3.04 


$2.31 


$2.38 


$2.53 



County 

County Average 

St. Mary's 

Queen Anne 's . . . 

Calvert 

Kent 

Caroline 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Howard 

Anne Arundel. . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1941 



1942 



1944 



County 



$1.86 

4.10 
3.34 
3.66 
3.32 
2.97 
3.24 
2.65 
2.16 
2.34 
1.97 
2.39 
2.57 



$1.90 

4.02 
3.51 
3.87 
3.56 
3.10 
3.12 
3.03 
2.40 
2.28 
1.98 
2.36 
2.31 



$2.21 

4.29 
4.19 
4.02 
4.02 
3.49 
3.41 
3.37 
2.92 
2.78 
2.77 
2.74 
2.70 



Dorchester. . . . 
Montgomery . . . 

Carroll 

Charles 

Cecil 

Harford 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Washington . . . . 
Prince George's 
Baltimore 

Baltimore City . 

Total State 



For basic data, see Table XIV, page 220. 



TABLE 87 

Average Current Expense Costf Per County White Elementary and White 
High School Pupil Belonging, 1923-1944 



Year 



1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 



Average Cost Per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



$39.84 
43.06 
43.67 
46.02 
47.26 
47.81 
49.49 
49.78 
50.17 
49.27 
46.95 



High 
Schools 



$91.12 
96.44 
95.16 
97.20 
98.43 
95.82 
96.00 
97.60 
98.54 
94.78 
82.62 



Year 



1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 



Average Cost Per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



$44.36 
45.16 
47.88 
49.72 
53.41 
63.50 
56.07 
66.95 
58.65 
60.70 

*71.16 



High 
Schools 



$76.21 
77.68 
80.48 
82.47 
90.87 
89.96 
91.45 
93.49 
97.86 

102.57 
*118.20 



t Excluding general control and fixed charges. 
* Includes State and county bonus. 
For basic data for 1944, see Tables XVIII and XIX, pages 224 and 225. 



Cost per Pupil for General Control and by Types of School 



105 



I 



-■1 



i 



11 



g . . ■ . 



5S S£5^gE:C5B§ 'sSSSESgSSSSS 5S 



S3 SgSSSSSSSSS :e3SgSSS§SgSS S :SSS 



SS S§SgSSSPSS3§SgSS§S?J3S2g 



ttl 



#11 



i iliiliftil 




106 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 24 



COST PER WHITE ELEMEOTARY SCHOOL PDPIL BELONGING 
rOB CUEfiENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 

County Average 

St. Maiy's 

Calvert 
Kent 

Montgomery 

Queen Anne's 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Allegany 

Talbot 

Charles 

Somerset 

Garrett 

Howard 

Cariroll 

Wicomico 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Cecil 

Harford 

Anne Arundel 

Washington 

Prince George's 

Baltimore 

Baltimore City 
State Average 




Excludes pupils attending elementary school at State teachers college in Allegany, 
Baltimore and Wicomico Counties. 

Data for elementary schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures for 
junior high schools: $127 in 1944, $107 in 1943 and $106 in 1942. 

County average for 1943 includes estimated expenditure of $1.72 per pupil by State 
and County Departments of Health for nine months from October 1. 1942 to June 30. 1943. 
See Table 139, paqre 194 for 1944 health expenditures which are not included in above data. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 224. 



Cost per White Elementary School Pupil Beionging 



107 



TABLE 89 

Cost Per Pupil Belonging in White One-Teacher, Two-Teacher and Graded 
Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1944, Exclusive of Expenditures 
for General Control, Supervision and Fixed Charges 



County 



One- 
Teacher 
Schools 



No 



Cost 
Per 
Pupil 



County 



Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 





Cost 


No. 


Per 




Pupil 


108 


$66 . 59 


108 


81.58 


1 


124.72 


3 


118.42 


7 


108.75 


3 


103 . 56 


5 


102 . 58 


5 


100.29 


8 


99.50 


5 


96.07 




91.71 


1 


90.49 


5 


88.57 


3 


88.15 


4 


84.40 


2 


82.19 


3 


80.94 




76.51 


3 


74.55 


10 


72.66 


12 


71.68 


8 


70.45 


4 


66.94 


5 


60.46 


3 


50.16 



County 



County Average; 

1943 

1944 

Talbot 

Carroll 

Montgomery . . . . 

Frederick 

Dorchester 

Queen Anne's . . . 
Prince George's. 

Allegany 

Garrett 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Howard 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Harford 

Charles 



143 


$70 


67 


118 


84 


02 


3 


139 


51 


2 


130 


20 


4 


122 


66 


1 


107 


92 


15 


104 


04 


6 


89 


61 


4 


86 


15 


6 


85 


52 


32 


84 


99 


1 


83 


33 


4 


82 


43 


6 


80 


71 


2 


71 


77 


5 


70 


84 


2 


69 


45 


9 


68 


66 


15 


68 


16 


1 


55 


84 



County Average 

1943 

1944 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Kent 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

St. Mary's 

Montgomery 

Charles 

Howard 

Prince George's. 

Talbot 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Wicomico 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Calvert 

Harford 

Washington 

Garrett 

Allegany 

Cecil 

Baltimore 



County Average 

1943 

1944 

Calvert 

Montgomery . . . . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

Worcester 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Allegany 

Charles 

Talbot 

Howard 

Wicomico 

Carroll 

Somerset 

Dorchester 

Garrett 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Frederick 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Harford 

Washington 

Prince George's. 
Baltimore 



309 


$58.62 


319 


68.65 


3 


92.43 


27 


87.14 


6 


81.91 




80.05 


4 


79.99 


3 


79.88 


28 


78.94 


6 


75.92 


5 


73.43 


7 


73.19 


11 


72.25 


14 


71.39 


6 


70.92 


7 


70.78 


11 


70.63 


6 


67.76 


8 


67.47 


21 


67.10 


22 


65.99 


14 


65.83 


27 


65.18 


37 


65.00 


39 


52.63 



Excludes estimated expenditures by State and county health departments on services to 
school children. 



108 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 90 



Cost Per Pupil in White Elementary Schools, Grades 1-7 (8), for the Main 
Subdivisions of Expenditures, Exclusive of General Control, 
for the Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 


Text- 
books 
and 
Other 
Costs of 

In- 
struction 


Opera- 
tion 


Main- 
tenance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies* 


Total 
Current 

Ex- 
penses 


oapitai 
Outlay 


County Average: 
































1943 


$1 


24 


$41 


82 


$1 


81 


$5 


26 


$1 


85 


$8 


72 


$60 


70 


$5.57 


1944 


1 


39 


49 


47 


2 


03 


6 


32 


2 


76 


9 


19 


71 


16 


2.96 




1 


61 


54 


74 


3 


09 


8 


20 


5 


05 


7 


70 


80 


39 


1.01 


Anne Arundel 


1 


14 


45 


76 


2 


67 


5 


41 


2 


34 


10 


53 


67 


85 


5.65 






66 


39 


28 


1 


01 


5 


11 


1 


23 


5 


86 


53 


15 


2.24 




4 


03 


48 


14 


1 


69 


7 


95 


3 


18 


26 


16 


91 


15 


39.55 




2 


14 


44 


57 


1 


66 


4 


92 


1 


70 


16 


45 


71 


44 


.09 


Caroll 


1 


49 


50 


10 


1 


51 


4 


73 


1 


44 


tl5 
9 


19 


74 


46 


.17 




1 


93 


48 


49 


2 


30 


5 


41 


1 


57 


04 


68 


74 


.43 




1 


60 


43 


15 


1 


98 


11 


08 


2 


47 


17 


32 


77 


60 


.79 




1 


58 


52 


34 


1 


74 


8 


41 


2 


91 


14 


25 


81 


23 






1 


06 


47 


75 


1 


16 


5 


56 


1 


37 


12 


06 


68 


96 


' .28 




1 


90 


49 


83 


1 


88 


3 


90 


1 


54 


16 


61 


75 


66 


6.08 


Harford 


1 


53 


50 


47 


1 


13 


5 


44 


1 


97 


7 


89 


68 


43 


.15 




1 


50 


48 


07 


2 


27 


5 


84 


1 


57 


15 


87 


75 


12 


.03 


Kent 


2 


62 


57 


12 


1 


82 


10 


68 


3 


79 


14 


74 


90 


77 


.99 




1 


26 


63 


54 


3 


30 


8 


94 


5 


60 


6 


16 


88 


80 


11.11 


Prince George's 


1 


19 


47 


56 


2 


11 


6 


82 


4 


40 


4 


86 


66 


94 


2.07 




2 


66 


54 


75 


2 


46 


7 


39 


2 


71 


18 


31 


88 


28 




St. Mary's 


3 


65 


54 


94 


1 


95 


4 


32 


1 


82 


26 


26 


92 


94 


* !i3 




2 


30 


47 


48 


2 


63 


5 


37 


1 


54 


16 


57 


75 


89 




Talbot 


2 


14 


51 


68 


1 


67 


7 


11 


1 


19 


15 


18 


78 


97 


' !ii 


Washington 


1 


72 


52 


31 


2 


05 


4 


59 


1 


55 


5 


23 


67 


45 


.26 




1 


07 


48 


70 


1 


87 


6 


67 


2 


79 


12 


70 


73 


80 


8,13 


Worcester 


2 


26 


52 


17 


1 


64 


7 


55 


2 


67 


19 


76 


86 


05 




Baltimore City Ele- 
































mentary 


1 


62 


62 


77 


2 


49 


10 


32 


2 


09 


1 


01 


80 


30 


.14 


Total State 


$1 


46 


$53 


60 


$2 


17 


$7 


57 


$2 


55 


$6 


65 


$74 


00 


$2.09 



* Excludes estimated expenditures by State and county health departments on services to school 
children shown in Table 137, page 194. 

t Includes 18 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 63 pupils to an elementary 
school in Carroll County. 

For basic data, see Table XVIII, page 224. 



Analysis of Cost per White Elementary and High School 109 

Pupil 



TABLE 91 



Cost Per Pupil in Last Four Years of White High Schools for the Main 
Subdivisions of Expenditures, Exclusive of General Control, for 
the Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 


Text- 
books 
and 
Other 
Costs of 
Instruc- 
tion 


Operation 


Main- 
tenance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


County Average: 


























1943 


$.64 


$75 


.35 


$5 


.15 


$7 


.78 


$2 


.87 


$10.78 


$102.57 


$4.32 


1944 


.86 


86 


81 


5 


.61 


9 


.52 


3 


.91 


11.49 


118.20 


1.72 




2.87 


86 


.25 


7 


.04 


11 


.28 


5 


.95 


8.20 


121.59 


3.01 




.06 


80 


.10 


7 


.36 


7 


.51 


5 


73 


15.13 


115.89 


.40 




1.34 


66 


56 


3 


35 


5 


91 


1 


.18 


6.14 


84.48 


.36 






78 


08 


4 


56 


6 


72 


2 


43 


42.11 


133.90 


2.31 






92 


29 


4 


92 


9 


00 


3 


.71 


16.66 


126.58 


.19 


Carroll 


2.69 


97 


02 


4 


10 


7 


88 


3 


.77 


*16.90 


132.36 


1.96 


Cecil 




87 


30 


5 


65 


13 


12 


1 


31 


11.99 


119.37 


.73 


Charles <. . . 




t93 


69 


5 


36 


ns 


15 


t5 


91 


26.73 


149.84 


2.20 


Dorchester 




90 


86 


3 


70 


14 


15 


5 


39 


21.10 


135.20 




Frederick 


" !i4 


76 


02 


6 


07 


7 


25 


1 


84 


tl3.68 


105.00 


'.'92 






80 


32 


4 


17 


6 


25 


2 


58 


28.82 


122.14 






i!4i 


95 


32 


4 


39 


10 


97 


5 


25 


.44 


117.78 


' '.76 






97 


48 


5 


89 


10 


38 


2 


72 


23.18 


139.65 


8.26 


Kent 




95 


27 


4 


98 


12 


81 


3 


39 


18.27 


134.72 




Montgomery 


i'.53 


116 


48 


10 


01 


12 


77 


5 


15 


1.48 


147.42 


2!34 


Prince George's 


.40 


86 


82 


7 


12 


9 


63 


6 


58 


4.67 


115.22 


.65 


Queen Anne's 




107 


22 


4 


64 


22 


72 


2 


67 


22.08 


159.33 








80 


73 


7 


10 


14 


45 


5 


20 


39.41 


146.89 


4!28 






103.92 


2 


38 


12 


57 


5 


97 


22.81 


147.65 


.05 


Talbot 




88 


34 


4 


67 


7 


75 


3 


34 


18.60 


122.70 








94 


61 


5 


38 


9 


23 


2 


74 


8.41 


120.37 


9!i9 


Wicomico 




87 


74 


4 


12 


8 


29 


4 


04 


15.90 


120.09 


.68 






92 


59 


3 


07 


9 


99 


4 


02 


22.73 


132.40 




Baltimore City 


1.84 


117.32 


6 


02 


16 


43 


2 


99 


2.19 


146.79 


.03 


Junior High 


2.10 


102 


56 


4 


66 


13 


74 


2 


63 


1.58 


127.27 


.03 


Senior High 


1.32 


130 


81 


6 


80 


18 


50 


3 


14 


2.88 


163.45 


.02 


Vocational 


2.72 


172.99 


14 


32 


29 


42 


5 


67 


3.64 


228.76 


.09 


Total State ° 


.96 


96 


82 


5 


88 


11 


56 


3 


73 


9.54 


$128.49 


1.33 



* Includes 18 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 9 pupils to a Carroll 
County high school. 

t Includes expenditures by Federal Government ta Indian Head. 

I Includes 36 cents for payment by Washington County for transporting 27 pupils to a Frederick 
County high school. 

° Total State includes only senior high schools of Baltimore City. 
For basic data, see Table XIX, page 225. 



110 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 25 



COST PER WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GEIJERAL CONTROL 



County 

County Average 

Queen Anne's 

Charles 

Somerset 

Montgomery 

St. Mary's 

Howard 

Dorchester 

Kent 

Calvert 

Worcester 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Allegnny 

Washington 

WlCOTliCO 

Cecil 

Harford 

Anne Arundel 

Prince George's 

Frederick 

Baltimore 

Baltimore Cityt 

State Average 




t Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: $127 in 1944. $107 in 1943 and $106 in 1942 ; and for vocational schools: $229 in 1944. 
$191 in 1943 and $175 in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 225. 



Cost per White High School Pupil; Growth in White High 
School Enrollment, Staff and Salaries 



be 



J 
I 

i 

^ C 
.5 r-l 

li 



I 

I 





1 


s 


Salaries 
f Dollars) 


1 




1 






1 


;j 


1 


1 


d 




i 






i 






i 






i 


lO T-( I-H jH 1— 1 rH 1—1 


i 


i 






eg 




I 


i 






i 






i 






i 


*37,572 

3,564 
2,650 
6,410 
267 
773 
1,703 
1,215 
597 
926 
2,374 
1,108 
1 , 582 
716 
475 
2,976 
3,988 
484 
432 
551 
593 
2,484 
1,186 
732 




i 


*39,531 

4,013 
2,695 
6,478 
255 
836 
1,809 
1,300 
619 
967 
2,393 
1,221 
1,627 
771 
513 
3,220 
4,081 
502 
457 
662 
625 
2,581 
1,258 
801 




i 






i 


*24,760 

2,649 
1,142 
2,957 
175 

1,240 
925 
404 
832 

1,932 
767 

1,103 
470 
504 

1,421 

1,680 
477 
212 
712 
691 

2,060 

1,093 
730 




i 


r " " " 




i 


*9,333 

1,093 
326 
954 

341 

571 
329 

342 
899 
298 
417 
155 
203 
305 
421 
264 

297 
287 
753 
577 
497 


County 




Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

('alvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



112 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
CHART 26 



COST PER COLORED ELHJIENTARY SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 
County Average 

Allegany 
Montgomery 
Cerroll 
Queen Anne' 8 
Cecil 

Washington 

Kent 

Harford 

Caroline 

Frederick 

St. Mary's 

Wicomico 

Howard 

Anne Arundel 

Dorchester 

Prince George's 

Talbot ' 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Charles 

Calvert 

Baltimore 

BaltiBore Cityt 
State Average 



1942 1943 1944 
I 46 $ 50 




Excludes pupils from Anne Arundel and Prince George's Counties attending elementary 
school at Bowie State Teachers College. 

t Data for elementary schools only. Excludes correspondiTig figures for junior high 
schools: $107 in 1944. $90 in 1943 and $88 in 1942. 

County average for 1943 includes estimated expenditures of $1.72 per pupil by State 
and County Departments of Health for nine months from October 1, 1942 to June 30,1943. 

See Table 137, page 194 for 1944 health expenditures, which are not included in 
county average. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 228. 



Cost per Colored Elementary and High School Pupil 



113 



CHART 27 



COST PER COLORED HIGH SCHOOL POPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 

Co. Average 

Allegany 
Washington 
Cecil 

Pr. George's 
Caroline 
Calvert 
Anne Arundel 
St. Mary's 
Talbot 
Carroll 
Howard 
Charles 
Montgomery 
Frederick 
Wicomico 
Queen Anne' 6 
Harford 
Kent 

Somerset 
Dorchester 
Worcester 
Baltimore 
Baltimore Citytl37 
State Average 97 



1942 1943 1944 
♦ 79 *$ 84 




* Tuition payment of $150 for 25 Baltimore County pupils attending Baltimore City 
senior high schools in 1943 is included in Baltimore County, Baltimore City and State figures, 
but is not included in county average. 

t Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: $107 in 1944, $90 in 1943 and $88 i-n 1942; and for vocational schools: $233 in 1944, 
$207 in 1943 and $181 in 1942. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 229. 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

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Growth in Colored High School Enrollment, Staff and 115 
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118 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 28 



COST PER CLASSROCM UNIT - 1943-44 



County 

County Average 

Montgomery 
Allegany 
Prince George's 
Anne Arundel 

Washington 

Queen Anne* 6 

Baltimore 

Kent 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Frederick 

Howard 

Charles 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Calvert 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Garrett 

St. Mary»s 

Baltimore City 

State Average 




$ 2,664- 



Cost per day school unit excluding transportation costs. 



Cost per Classroom Unit; Federal Vocational Education 
Funds Allotted and Expended 



119 



TABLE 97— Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and 
Expended in Maryland, 1943-44 





1944 


1944 


Unexpended 


Purpose 


Allotment 


Expenditures 


Balance 


Agriculture 


$69,133.88 


$59,670.46 


$9,463.42 


Trade and Industry 


99,564.71 


74,159.33 


25,405.38 


Home Economics 


49,673.98 


48,895.95 


778.03 


Teacher Training and Supervision 


26,589.84 


24,971.28 


1,618.56 


Education for Distributive Occupations 


14,889.42 


14,384.87 


504.55 


Total 


$259,851.83 


$222,081.89 


$37,769.94 



TABLE 98 

Federal Vocational Funds Expended by Subject and Type of School, 1943-44 



Type of School 


SUBJECT 


Total 


Agriculture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Distributive 
Education 


County Day 

White 

Colored 
County Evening 

White 

Colored 
University of Maryland 

Mining 


a$43,922.05 
al4,889.03 

216.00 


b$29,999.24 
cl0,675.85 

2,479.50 
1,116.00 


d$28,387.50 
5,400.00 

564.00 
432.00 

el, 920. 00 
e2,318.00 

f 28, 693. 44 

4,516.00 


$8,194.99 
54.00 


$110,503.78 
30,964.88 

3 , 097 . 50 
1,764.00 

1,920.00 
2,318.00 

30,833.44 

10,132.50 


Volunteer Firemen 

Baltimore City 

Day 

Evening and Part- 
Total 








90.00 


4,072.00 


f2,050.00 
1,544.50 


$59,117.08 


$48,342.59 


$72,230.94 


$11,843.49 


$191,534.10 



a Includes payments for travel. 

b Includes salary and travel of teachers who worked during the summer and of coordinators, 
c Includes salary and travel of teachers who worked during the summer, 
d Includes salaries of coordinators. 

e Provides for an enrollment of 98 in mining and 152 firemen in 45 centers, 
f Excludes Federal reimbursements for teacher training and supervision of $3950 for industrial 
education and $1037.50 for distributive education. 



120 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Enrollment and Federal Aid for County Day Vocational 121 
Education 



TABLE 100 



Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Maryland County Day High Schools for 
Colored Pupils, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



X r>Ar\ AnU 


Agriculture 


Vocational Home Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Total 
Federal 
Aid for 
Regular 
Salaries 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Federal Aid for 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Federal Aid for 


Salaries 


Travel 


Regular 
Salaries 


Sum 
Salaries 


mer 
Travel 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Fed- 
eral 
Aid 


1940-41 


935 


$9,077.64 


$885.97 


1,156 


$5,891.00 


$104.00 


$10.00 


194 


$ 

5,150.00 


$20,118.64 


1941-42 


870 


12,373.30 


1.845.11 


1,091 


5,256.71 


115.00 


10.00 


160 


5,206.00 


22,836.01 


1942-43 


931 


12,098.67 


1,693.74 


1,389 


7,056.75 


873.00 


81.78 


147 


5,250.00 25.278.42 


1943-44 


ab911 


13,270.44 


1,618.59 


1.511 


9,775.50 


807.50 


92.85 


133 


5,400.00 


30.964.88 


Allegany 








28 


354.00 






16 


800.00 


1.154.00 


Anne Arundel .... 


' 'ii 


1,213.33 


5!36 


117 


850.00 


326! 66 


59.65 


81 


3.400.00 


5,848.23 


Calvert 


47 


1,040.00 


34.57 


104 


462.50 


187.50 






1,724.57 


Caroline 


80 


840.00 


198.10 


76 


312.50 


180.00 


26! 65 






1,550.65 


Carroll 


30 


747.60 


49,72 














797.32 


Charles 


136 


1,740.00 


232.16 


'225 


606!66 










2,572.16 


Dorchester 


,a95 


600.00 


247.62 


65 


300.00 






■ 36 


1.206!66 


2,347.62 


Frederick 


b8 


b213.01 




64 


346.50 








659.51 


Harford 








103 


1,600.00 










1,600.00 


Howard 


■ '58 


486! 66 




53 


300.00 










780.00 


Kent 


69 


676.50 


76.66 


94 


300.00 










1,047.16 


Montgomery 


101 


1,275.00 


32.50 


103 


2,250.00 










3,557.50 


Prince George's. . 


66 


500.00 


10.00 


82 


500.00 










1,010.00 


Queen Anne 's . . . . 








87 


312.50 










312,50 


St. Mary's 


' 45 


1,086.66 


162 ;i9 


77 


387.50 










1,629.69 


Somerset 








82 


300.00 










300.00 


Talbot 


' 65 


875.00 


222^82 


91 


300.00 


126.66 


13^26 






1,531.02 




27 


1,080.00 


171.71 














1,251.71 


Worcester 


43 


910.00 


181.24 


"60 


300.66 










1.391.24 



a Includes 56 taking general agriculture. 

b Course discontinued when teacher resigned. 



122 1944 Report of Maryland Stape DepartxMent of Education 



TABLE 101 

Expenditures For Adult Education in Maryland Counties, 1943-44 



County 


Salary Expenditures 


Percent of 
Salary Expendi- 
tures from 


County 
Expendi- 
tures for 
Other than 
Salaries* 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 


State 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Grand Total 


$14,434.50 


$4,861.50 


$9,573.00 


33.7 


66.3 


$1,971.72 


$2,253.13 





White Adults 



Total Counties 


$12,090 


00 


$3,097.50 


$8,992 


50 


25 


6 


74 


4 


$1,631 


72 


$2,114.63 




2,214 


00 


1,309.50 


904 


50 


59 


1 


40 


9 


515 


80 


708.00 




1,327 


50 


1,327 


50 






100 





67 


71 


210.00 


Carroll 


585 


00 


216.00 


369 


00 


36 


9 


63 


1 


95 


00 


95.00 


Cecil 


342 


00 


36.00 


306 


00 


10 


5 


89 


5 


68 


00 


172.50 


Charles 


306 


00 




306 


00 






100 











Dorchester 


549 


00 


72! 00 


477 


00 


i3 


1 


86 


9 










31 


50 




31 


50 






100 











Garrett 


229 


50 




229 


50 






100 





34 


60 






1,096 


50 


60.00 


1,036 


50 


'5 


5 


94 


5 








Kent 


108 


00 




108 


00 






100 











Montgomery 


3,573 


00 


1,126.56 


2,452 


50 


3i 


4 


68 


6 


69i 


50 


646! 50 


Prince George's. . . 


1,404 


00 


283 . 50 


1,120 


50 


20 


2 


79 


8 


79 


71 


249.63 




108 


00 




108 


00 






100 





12 


00 




Talbot 


108 


00 




108 


00 






100 













76 


50 




76 


50 






100 





50 


60 


IS^OO 




31 


50 




31 


50 






100 





18 


00 


18.00 


Colored Adults 


Total Counties. . .. 


$2,344.50 


$1,764.00 


$580.50 


75 


2 


24 


8 


$340.00 


$138.50 


Allegany 


216 


00 


216.00 






100 









48 


00 


30.00 




648 


00 


648.00 






100 









144 


00 




Cecil 


108 


00 




108 


60 






166 


6 


23 


00 


56! 66 




261 


00 


45.60 


216 


00 


17 


2 


82 


8 


29 


00 


38.50 




54 


00 


54.00 






100 















Talbot 


432 


00 


432.00 






100 

















625 


50 


369.00 


256 


50 


59 





41 


6 


96 


.60 


26.66 



*Oflfset by receipts from fees in next column. 



Expenditures for County Adult Education; Federal Aid for 123 
Baltimore City Vocational Education and for State 
Administration , Supervision and Teacher Training 



TABLE 102 

Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Baltimore City Schools for School 
Year Ending June 30. 1944 



Type of School 



Total 
Federal 
Funds 



Enrollment 



Male 



Female 



Day Vocational — Agriculture — Colored 

Day Vocational — Industrial 

White 

Colored 

Teacher Training — Industrial Education 

Part Time Trade Extension and Preparatory . 

White 

Colored 

Distributive Occupational Classes. 

Day 

White 

Colored 

Evening or Part-time 

White 

Colored 

Supervision and Teacher Training 

Evening Home Economics 

White 

Colored 



$90.00 
28,693.44 



3,950.00 
4,516.00 



2,050.50 
i, 544 .50 



1,037.50 
4,072.00 



10 



1058 
281 



346 
10 



23 



304 
116 



50 
20 

15i 
2 

237 

iei 

276 



Total $45,953.94 



1,887 



1,403 



TABLE 103 



Expenditures for Administration, Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Purpose 


Administration 
and Supervision 


Teacher Training 


Total 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


University 
of 

Maryland 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
and 
University 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Agriculture 

Home Economics .... 

Industrial Education 

Distributive Ed- 
ucation .Occu- 
pational Informa- 
tion and Guidance 

Total 


°$2,665.99 
°3,451.96 
°2,867.41 

°3,404.33 


t$2, 563.27 
t3,549.29 
t3, 117.80 

t3,287.51 


*$2,883.81 
*2,313.15 
*7,845.45 


*$2,883.81 
*2.313.15 
*7,845.45 


$5,549.80 
5.765.11 
10,712.86 

3,404.33 


$5,447.08 
5,862.44 
10,963.25 

3,287.51 


°$12,389.69 


t$12,517.87 


$13,042.41 


$13,042.41 


$25,432.10 


$25,560.28 



° Includes $2,432.03 cost of administration allocated equally to each of the four services.i.e. $608.01 
t Includes $2 , 213.51 cost of administration allocated equally to each of the four services i.e. $553.38 
t Includes $545.75 from agriculture, $691.14 from trade and industry, $546.74 from home eco- 
nomics, $950.50 from distributive education and $553.38 for administration. 

* Includes for Princess Anne College, $583.12 for agriculture, $450.70 for home economics and 
$853.87 for industrial education. 



124 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 104 



Maryland County Expenditures for Transporting Pupils to School 1910-1944 













year 


Public 


Number of 


Number of 


Spent per 


Expenditures for 


Counties 


Pupils 


Pupil 




Transportation !t§ 




Transported f 


Transported t§ 


1910 


$5,210 


4 






1915 


17,270 


10 






1920 


64,734 


18 






1923 


132,591 


20 


4,344 


$30 . 52 


1924 


188,516 


21 


6,499 


29.01 


1925 


242,041 


22 


8,618 


28.09 


1 aoet 


312 , 495 


22 


10, 567 


29 . 57 


1927 


373,168 


23 


13,385 


27.88 


1928 


436,583 


23 


15,907 


27.45 


1929 


*512,385 


23 


18,928 


27.07 


1930 


*603 , 148 


23 


22,814 


26.44 




itrr I A A f\r\ 

*(44,4UU 


23 


Z9,00d 


25.66 


1932 


*834,679 


23 


35,019 


23.84 


1933 


858,274 


23 


40,308 


21.29 


1934 


863,549 


23 


42,241 


20.44 


1935 


892,422 


23 


44,576 


20.02 


1936 


952,598 


23 


°49,051 


19.42 




1,019,872 


23 


°52,248 


19.52 


1938 


1,121,498 


23 


°56,268 


19.93 


1939 


1,202,784 


23 


°61,753 


19.48 


1940 


1,285,520 


23 


°66,036 


19.47 


1941 


1,326,389 


23 


°70,162 


18.90 


1942 


1,411,110 


23 


°74,113 


19.04 


1943 


1,491,244 


23 


°74,711 


19.96 


1944 


1,561,711 


23 


74,813 


20.87 



TABLE 105 

County Pupils Transported to Public Schools at Public Expense, 1923-1944 



YEAR 


Pupils Transported to School at Public Expense 


Public Funds 
Expended for 
Transportation of t§ 


Number Transported 


Percent Transported 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


White 
Pupils 


Colored 
Pupils 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


1923 


3,485 


133 


843 





3 


1 


6 





$129,738 


$2,853 


1924 


4,682 


133 


1,701 





5 


1 


11 





185,263 


3,253 


1925 


6,269 


144 


2,197 


1 


6 


1 


13 





238,094 


3,947 


1926 


7,613 


105 


2,835 


14 


8 





15 


2 


308,596 


3.899 


1927 


9,778 


tl40 


3,424 


15 


10 


1 


17 


1 


368,089 


5,079 


1928 


11,774 


t201 


3,870 


20 


11 


1 


18 


2 


431,065 


5,517 


1929 


14,028 


t247 


4,632 


23 


14 


1 


20 


2 


506,478 


♦5,907 


1930 


16,670 


t310 


5,660 


174 


16 


1 


23 


9 


594,473 


*8,675 


1931 


20,593 


t493 


7,746 


215 


20 


2 


29 


10 


726,747 


♦17,653 


1932 


24,787 


t724 


9,019 


477 


23 


3 


32 


19 


807,373 


♦27,305 


1933 


28,741 


t847 


10,157 


502 


27 


3 


34 


19 


828,067 


30,207 


1934 


29,969 


Tl,051 


10,581 


740 


28 


4 


35 


27 


826,817 


36,732 


1935 


31,147 


tl,096 


11,517 


1,035 


29 


4 


37 


35 


850,481 


41,938 


1936 


32,676 


tl,389 


13,191 


°1,795 


31 


6 


41 


51 


890,325 


°62,272 


1937 


34,076 


tl,807 


13,970 


°2,395 


32 


8 


42 


59 


944,922 


°74,951 


1938 


35,980 


t2,749 


14,556 


°2,983 


34 


12 


43 


68 


1,013,356 


°108,142 


1939 


38,201 


t4,147 


16,147 


°3,258 


36 


18 


45 


70 


1,066,880 


°135,904 


1940 


40,633 


t4,834 


17,122 


°3 , 447 


38 


21 


45 


71 


1,134,161 


°151,359 


1941 


42,765 


t5,472 


18,326 


°3,599 


40 


24 


47 


70 


1,160,242 


°166,146 


1942 


45,055 


t6,650 


18,893 


°3,515 


42 


29 


48 


69 


1,223,726 


°187,384 


1943 


45,733 


t6,591 


18,804 


°3,583 


42 


29 


49 


69 


1,288,998 


°202,246 


1944 


46,025 


t6,904 


18,340 


3,544 


1 " 


31 


50 


70 


1,337,030 


224,681 



t Includes county pupils transported to elementary school at Bowie Normal School or State 
Teachers College from 1927 to date. 

♦ Includes Rosenwald aid toward transportation of pupils. 

° Includes Baltimore County pupils toward whose transportation costs to Baltimore City high 
schools Baltimore County contributed. 

§ Excludes cost of State bus transporting pupils to Bowie Normal School or Teachers College 
from 1927 to date. 

X Excludes payments by parents toward cost of high school transportation In several counties. 



Number of Pupils Transported and Expenditures for 
Transportation 



125 



TABLE 106 



Maryland County Pupils Transported to School in 1943-44 at Public Expense 



County 


Pupils Transported 


Public Expense for Transportation 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total Counties 


t74,813 


t52,929 


21,884 


§$1,561,710 


86 


§$1,093,077 


00 


§$468,633.86 


Baltimore 


11,147 


7,861 


3,286 


5149,457 


69 


113,626 


91 


§35,830.78 




t6,235 


t3,944 


2,291 


115,867 


34 


70 , 839 


79 


45,027.55 


Frederick 


*4,636 


3,280 


♦1,356 


109,100 


11 


75,096 


09 


34,004.02 




4,971 


3,767 


1,204 


104,648 


55 


78,061 


30 


26,587.25 


Carroll 


t4,298 


:3,125 


:i,173 


94,386 


22 


66,209 


14 


28,177.08 


Montgomery 


6,418 


5,292 


1,126 


590,214 


81 


83,909 


75 


§6,305.06 


Garrett 


2,366 


1,527 


839 


80,799 


24 


61 , 847 


45 


28,951.79 


Washington 


3,975 


2,999 


976 


73,385 


50 


53,703 


98 


19,681.52 




t4,881 


t3,305 


1,576 


66,473 


66 


43,467 


08 


23,006.58 




2,242 


1,426 


816 


64,190 


16 


41,194 


09 


22,996.07 


Dorchester " . 


1,976 


1,274 


702 


63,803 


20 


40,834 


49 


22,968.71 


Charles 


2,459 


1,683 


776 


58,751 


73 


37,138 


41 


21,613.32 


Worcester 


2,100 


1,433 


667 


56,768 


87 


38,166 


23 


18,602.64 


Howard 


2,531 


1,806 


725 


54,849 


75 


37,796 


16 


17,053.59 


Caroline 


1,882 


1,304 


578 


48,589 


47 


33,669 


28 


14,920.19 


Cecil 


2,206 


1,486 


720 


48,461 


29 


32,353 


89 


16,107.40 




1,560 


993 


567 


47,710 


24 


28,622 


70 


19,087.54 




1,861 


1,295 


566 


47,092 


66 


31,628 


89 


15,463.77 


Queen Anne's 


1,391 


900 


491 


40,150 


91 


27,682 


55 


12,468.36 


Talbot 


1,548 


1,058 


490 


40,111 


93 


27,482 


46 


12,629.47 


Calvert 


1.258 


856 


402 


38,833 


25 


23,012 


52 


15,820.73 


Harford 


1,628 


1,490 


138 


535,660 


96 


§35,504 


96 


§156.00 


Kent 


1,244 


825 


419 


32,403 


32 


21,228 


88 


11,174.44 



t Includes 94 pupils, 22 from Anne Arundel and 72 from Prince George's transported to the elementary school 
at Bowie State Teachers College. 

♦ Includes 27 Washington County pupils attending a Frederick County high school at the expense of Washington 
County. 

X Includes 63 elementary and 9 high school Frederick County pupils attending Carroll County schools at the 
expense of Frederick County. 

5 Supplemented by payments of high school pupils In Baltimore, Harford, and Montgomery Counties and ele- 
mentary pupils In Harford County totalling $18,205.15; $1,946.81; $11,860.20 and $452.66; respectively. 



126 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 107 

Expenditures of Public Funds Per Maryland County Pupil Transported 
to School for Year Ending June 30, 1944 



Average Expenditure op Public Funds Per County Pupil 
Transported to 



County 


All 

County 
Schools 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 
Schools 


High 
Schools 


Elementary 
Schools 


High 
Schools 


County Average 


$20 


87 


$20 


65 


$21 


09 


$20 


69 


$23 


09 


Garrett 


34 


15 


33 


95 


34 


51 












32 


95 


35 


96 


36 


63 


25 


44 


24 


38 




30 


87 


30 


75 


41 


09 


16 


28 


36 


42 




30 


85 


35 


81 


37 


13 


16 


91 


25 


36 




28 


86 


29 


29 


26 


23 


36 


18 


22 


90 




28 


63 


32 


57 


31 


52 


20 


37 


21 


79 




27 


03 


31 


78 


33 


62 


18 


02 


16 


33 


Kent 


26 


05 


27 


11 


28 


01 


23 


19 


23 


86 


Talbot 


25 


91 


31 


65 


29 


48 


17 


66 


16 


96 


Caroline 


25 


82 


25 


82 


25 


82 


25 


82 


25 


79 




25 


31 


30 


33 


34 


40 


16 


19 


17 


13 


Charles 


23 


89 


25 


38 


33 


23 


15 


74 


21 


27 


Frederick 


t23 


53 


22 


81 


t24 


46 


24 


20 


31 


60 


Cecil 


21 


97 


20 


58 


20 


13 


35 


74 


39 


13 


Carroll 


X21 


96 


t20 


92 


t23 


77 


27 


73 


27 


85 




§21 


90 


§24 


46 


§1 


23 


18 


42 


§. 






21 


67 


21 


27 


24 


20 


18 


85 


19 


3i 


Allegany 


21 


05 


20 


67 


21 


99 


46 


85 


34 


57 




18 


58 


17 


92 


17 


78 


*19 


28 


30 


32 


Washington 


18 


46 


17 


23 


19 


76 


69 


67 


76 


07 


Montgomery 


§14 


06 


14 


99 


§3 


88 


20 


63 


§11 


81 


Prince George's 


13 


62 


13 


05 


12 


27 


*14 


76 


23 


96 




§13 


41 


14 


12 


§10 


83 


20 


00 


§13 


56 



t Includes average cost of $36. 11 for 27 Washington County pupils attending a Frederick County 
high school at a cost of $975 to Washington. 

t Includes average cost of $18.06 for 63 elementary and 9 high school Frederick County pupils 
attending school in Carroll County at a cost of $1 ,300 to Frederick County. 

§ Supplemented by payment per high school pupil of $20 in Baltimore County, $15 in Mont- 
gomery, and varying amounts per high school pupil and white elementary school pupil transported 
in Harford. 

* Excludes cost of State bus transporting 22 pupils from Anne Arundel and 72 pupils from Prmce 
George's to Bowie State Teachers College. 



Cost per Pupil Transported; Percent of Pupils Transported 127 



TABLE 108 



Number and Percent of Maryland County Pupils Transported to School at 
Public Expense, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total and Average 


















1942 


45,005 


42.1 


18,893 


48.1 


6,650 


29.0 


3,515 


69.4 


1943. 


45,733 


42,0 


18,804 


49.0 


6,591 


29.3 


3,583 


69.0 


1944 


46,025 


42.4 


18,340 


50.1 


*6,904 


31.2 


3.544 


69.8 


St. Mary's... 


626 


72.6 


400 


99.5 


367 


55.6 


167 


98.2 




1,551 


74.0 


625 


90.2 


255 


45.1 


100 


90.1 


Carroll 


3,004 


70.2 


1,101 


65.3 


121 


49.6 


72 


75.0 




969 


62.9 


450 


59.7 


335 


63.2 


128 


81.0 




708 


62.0 


368 


77.1 


192 


41.4 


123 


91.8 




1,104 


67.4 


427 


73.1 


579 


42.0 


349 


95.6 




897 


60.5 


446 


62.6 


536 


51.0 


221 


73.9 


Calvert 


627 


83.0 


253 


97.7 


229 


21.7 


149 


97.4 


Kent 


535 


51.8 


284 


61.2 


290 


50.9 


135 


82.8 




754 


53.1 


334 


61.9 


541 


49.6 


232 


72.5 




1,527 


47.2 


839 


77.7 










Talbot 


629 


46.8 


345 


59.4 


429 


56.6 


145 


74.7 




3,069 


51.4 


1,239 


53.2 


211 


33.0 


117 


60.3 




3,813 


54.4 


1,949 


76.3 


*131 


4.5 


342 


57.2 




1,369 


42.7 


635 


54.2 


117 


36.1 


85 


76.6 




801 


38.5 


478 


52.2 


473 


46.7 


224 


64.0 




996 


36.8 


536 


46.1 


430 


40.4 


280 


70.5 


Baltimore. . 


7,408 


39.2 


3,196 


51.4 


453 


22.8 


90 


28.8 




4,481 


39.8 


882 


31.2 


811 


48.1 


244 


88.1 




3,759 


35.0 


1,195 


34.3 


8 


4.7 


9 


15.0 


Washington 


2,960 


29.8 


969 


39.8 


39 


18.5 


7 


12.3 


Harford 


1,335 


40.0 


127 


8.5 


155 


20.9 


11 


6.1 


Prince George's 


3,103 


24.6 


1,262 


33.3 


*202 


6.6 


314 


83.5 



* Includes 22 pupils from Anne Arundel and 72 pupils from Prince George's transported to 
elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College. 



128 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 109 



Number of County Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public 
Expense and Number of Vechicles Used, 1943-44 





Schools for White Pupils 




Total 


Number 
of 














Schools 

for 
Colored 
Pupils 






Cor. JTY 


With Elementary Grades 
Only 


With 
High 
and 


With 
High 


Number 
of 

Different 
Schools 


Bus- 


Private 




One- 
Teacher 


Two- 
Teacher 


Graded 


Ele- 
mentary 
Grades 


School 
Only 


es 


Cars 


Total Counties. . . 


33 


67 


187 


94 


47 


161 


589 
30 


gl,005 


97 


Allegany 




3 


16 


6 


4 


1 


74 


8 


Anne Arundel .... 




3 
1 


21 
22 


1 

8 


4 

3 


*5 
10 


34 
44 


51 
bl02 


'2 


Calvert 




3 


3 




1 


3 


10 


c21 


5 


Caroline 




3 


1 


'5 




4 


13 


37 




Carroll 




4 


5 


9 




5 


23 


c49 


3 


Cecil 


"i 


3 


4 


4 


'4 


4 


20 


31 


6 


Charles 






2 


4 


1 


10 


17 


c27 




5 


'3 


5 


5 


1 


12 


31 


48 


2 


Frederick 




4 


15 
6 


5 


2 


7 


33 


d80 


3 




ie 


6 


4 


1 




33 


d51 


26 




1 




3 


a8 




'9 


21 


e32 


2 




2 


i 


4 


3 


i 


4 


15 


24 


1 


Kent 




7 


1 


3 


1 


8 


20 


25 




Montgomery 

Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. .. . 


'4 

2 


3 
1 

3 
8 


20 
17 
6 
3 


5 
4 

i 


6 
5 
5 
1 


15 
10 
11 

9 


49 
37 
29 
24 


f63 
39 
25 
25 


*i 

25 
9 


Somerset 


1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


8 


18 


35 




Talbot 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


10 


20 


c29 


i 


Washington 




5 


17 


7 


2 


1 


32 


50 


1 






1 


5 


5 


1 


6 


18 


44 


1 






2 


3 


4 




9 


18 


43 


1 


Baltimore City . . . 
Entire State 


33 


67 


h4 
hl91 


1 

95 


47 


1 

162 


h5 
h594 


hl2 

gh 
1,017 


97 



* Excludes bus carrying pupils to elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College. 

a Five of these to elementary only, b Includes 27 owned by county, c Includes one owi 

by 3 owned by county, e Includes 5 owned by county, f All owned by county, 

g Includes 105 owned by nine counties, h Excludes buses of U. S. Gov't, transportmg 
children from Armistead Gardens to two schools. 



Number of Schools to Which Pupils Are Transported; 
. Vehicles Used; Capital Outlay 



129 



TABLE 110 



Capital Outlay for the Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 


White Elementary 


White 
High 
Schools 


Colored 
Schools 


Grand 
Total 


One- 
Teacher 
Schools 


Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 


Graded 
Schools 


All 

Elementary 
Schools 


Total Counties. . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 


$18.18 


$47,902.40 

39.95 
28,818.40 


$272,097.38 

10,747.52 
39,335.18 
42,047.03 
526.96 
133.27 
697.31 
1,360.08 
1,298.05 


$320,017.96 

10,747.52 
39,375.13 
42,047.03 
29,345.36 
133.27 
697.31 
1,360.08 
1,298.05 


$83,618.56 

10,691.51 
986.01 

2,132.11 
583.29 
138.18 

3,167.50 
816.66 

1,213.27 


$14,829.16 

18.67 
650.26 
363.90 
720 . 54 
26.86 
16.00 


$418,465.68 

a21,457.70 
40,911.40 
b44,543.04 
30,649.19 
298.31 
3,880.81 
2,176.74 
2,891.72 


Charles 

Dorchester 






380.40 


Garrett 


-18.18 


368.43 
18,488.89 


1,246.11 
1,039.70 
649 . 13 
57.59 


1,632.72 
19,528.59 
649 . 13 
57.59 


3,039.21 


41.48 


c4,713.41 
19,528.59 
1,973.01 
5,709,05 
700.00 
dl53,135.25 
30,105.00 


Howard 




1,092.83 
5,520.64 


231.05 
130.82 
700 . 00 
683.03 
1,902.01 


M ontgomery 

Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne 's 




48.80 


124,260.79 
25,840.92 


124,309.59 
25,840.92 


28,142.63 
2,362.07 


St. Mary's 






115.95 


115.95 


1,640.48 
25.60 


1.85 
5,760.97 
1,858.41 
1,003.25 
439.66 


1,758.28 
5,786.57 
1,986.41 
24,882.85 
21,378.35 


Talbot 


128.00 
9.93 




128.00 
2,568.02 
20,183.70 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 




2,568.02 
20,173.77 


21,311.58 
754.99 


Baltimore City .... 
Elementary 






6,728.13 
6,728.13 


6,728.13 
6,728.13 


906.41 


636.72 
501.23 
13.75 
27.50 
94.24 


e8,271.26 
7,229.3b 
465.50 
358.16 
218.24 


Junior High. . . . 
Senior High , , , 






451.75 
330.66 
124.00 

$84,524.97 










Vocational 










Total State 


$18.18 


$47,902.40 


$278,825.51 


$326,746.09 


$15,465,881 $426,736.94 



a Includes $700 . 00 for administration building. 

b Includes $34,453.60 from Federal Works Agency. 

c Includes $982.64 for administration building. 

d Includes $21,025.83 for administration building and $32,326.19 from Federal Works Agency, 
e Includes $135.76 for administration building. 

For basic data by county, see Tables XVII to XIX, XXI and XXII, pages 223, 225, 22S and 229. 



130 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 111 



School Bonds Outstanding as of June 30, 1944 







1944 Assessable 




Percent that 






Basis Taxable 


Assessable Basis 


Indebtedness 


County 


School Bonds 


at Full Rate 


Back of Each 


for School Bonds 




Outstanding 


for County 


Dollar of School 


Is of Total 




June 30, 1944 


Purposes 


Indebtedness 


County Basis 


All Counties 


$17,368,353 


$1,424,425,955 


$82 


1.2 


Allegany 


3,116,000 


95,483,356 


31 


3.3 


Anne Arundel 


al, 068, 365 


69,566,913 


65 


1.5 




2,423,000 


359,747,700 


148 


.7 


Calvert 


42,500 


7,316,412 


172 


.6 


Caroline 


111,000 


16,244,459 


146 


.7 


Carroll 





43,419,220 


t 





Cecil 


258,880 


53,694,226 


207 


.5 


Charles 


94,000 


12,937,084 


138 


.7 


Dorchester 


396,840 


25,423,545 


64 


1.6 


Frederick 


973,540 


72,153,625 


74 


1.3 


Garrett 





19,389,498 


t 





Harford 


191,100 


66,055,504 


346 


.3 


Howard. 


303,990 


21,299,147 


70 


1.4 


Kent 





18,558,520 


t 





Montgomery 


4,238,713 


181,243,275 


43 


2.3 


Prince George's 


bl, 880, 425 


cl34,867,487 


72 


1.4 


Queen Anne's 


168,000 


18,830,826 


112 


.9 


St. Mary's 


d 


10,076,880 


t 





Somerset 


47,000 


12,992,382 


276 


.4 


Talbot 


138,000 


23,332,300 


169 


.6 


Washington 


1,018,000 


101,577.116 


100 


1.0 


Wicomico 


744,000 


37,168,621 


50 


2.0 


Worcester 


155,000 


23,047,859 


149 


.7 


Baltimore City 


el3,182,543 


1,341,061,355 


102 


1.0 


Entire State 


$30,550,896 


$2,765,487,310 


$91 


1.1 



a $98,635 sinking fund balance has been deducted, 
b $228,075 sinking fund balance has been deducted. 

c Excludes $6,784,761 for Greenbelt, Calvert, Carry Houses, and Maryhurst. 

d Excludes $18,900 of short term indebtedness. 

e $1,465,544 sinking fund balance has been deducted. 

t Infinity. 



School Bonds Outstanding; School Debt and Interest 131 
Payment per Pupil; Value of School Property 



TABLE 112 

School Debt* and Interest Payments! Per Pupil Belonging, 1944 



County 



School 
Debt Per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



Interest 
Payments 
Per Pupil 
Belonging 



County 



School 
Debt Per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 



$102.01 

219.19 
83.30 
89.87 
19.54 
38.24 
0.00 
54.69 
24.26 
92.96 

108.56 
0.00 
28.75 



$4.17 

7.54 
5.62 
4.32 
1.11 
1.67 
0.00 
1.76 
1.06 
3.00 
5.15 
0.00 
.63 



Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City. 

Total State 



$88.24 
0.00 

268.04 
96.90 
75.37 
0.00 
14.29 
49.06 
81.92 

143.71 
44.98 

123 . 78 

$110.39 



t See Table XVII, page 223 for interest payments on bonded indebtedness. 



TABLE 113 



Value of School Property, 1922-1944 



Year 


Value of School Property 


Value Per Pupil Enrolled 


Maryland 


Counties 


Baltimore 
Cityt 


Maryland 


Counties 


Baltimore 
Cityt 


1922 


$20,453,646 


$10,014,638 


$10,439,008 


$82 


$68 


$103 


1923 


22,236,638 


11,796,630 


10,440,008 


87 


77 


100 


1924 


28,264,507 


12,813,396 


15.451,111 


110 


85 


147 


1925 


33,622,503 


14,946,810 


18,675,693 


129 


97 


164 


1926 


38,865,024 


16,704,564 


22,160,460 


148 


108 


205 


1927 


48,654,045 


17,889,796 


30,764,249 


182 


114 


277 


1928 


51,765,517 


18,994,670 


32,770,847 


191 


120 


291 


1929 


52,801,013 


19,920,102 


32,880,911 


193 


124 


290 


1930 


55,741,316 


21,483,720 


34,257,596 


201 


132 


297 


1931 


61,141,759 


23,830,725 


37,311,034 


217 


144 


321 


1932 


64,116,448 


24,608,923 


39,507,525 


222 


146 


331 


1933 


66,030,676 


25,350.740 


40,679,936 


225 


147 


335 


1934 


72,241,647 


25,501,303 


46.740,344 


246 


149 


384 


1935 


74,116,872 


26,847,518 


47,269,354 


251 


156 


384 


1936 


74,429,453 


26,778,790 


47,650,663 


250 


155 


380 


1937 


*78,573,662 


*29, 656,237 


48,917,425 


*264 


*171 


395 


1938 


*81,336,202 


*3 1,702, 972 


49,633,230 


*277 


*184 


410 


1939 


*82,477,467 


*33,801,326 


49,676,141 


*278 


*188 


408 


1940 


*86,373,506 


*36, 605,396 


49,768,110 


*291 


*208 


412 


1941 


*87,253,746 


♦37,426,526 


49,827,220 


*292 


*210 


414 


1942 


*88,171,154 


*38,442,796 


49,728,358 


*296 


*213 


421 


1943 


*89,953,989 


*39,490,295 


50,463,694 


*300 


*217 


430 


1944 


*89,951,808 


*39,824,086 


50,127,722 


*304 


*223 


427 



* Includes value of equipment in Maryland counties, but excludes value of administration 
buildings. 

t Excludes value of equipment, and also of administration buildings, warehouses, and storage 
buildings. 



132 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 114 



Value of School Property, Including Equipment, Per Pupil Belonging, 1944 





School Property Used 


School 


Property Used 


County 


BY White Pupils 


BY Colored Pupils 


















Average 


Value 




Average 


value 




Valuet 


Number 


Per 


Valuet 


Number 


Per 




Belonging 


White 


Belonging 


Colored 








Pupil 






PupU 


Total Counties /1943 


x$37.376,530 


143,807 


$260 


$2,113,765 


26,633 


$79 


\1944 


37,719,487 


143,761 


262 


2,104,599 


26,502 


79 




5,180,839 


13,986 


370 


85,218 


230 


371 


Anne Arundel 


1,970,300 


9,416 


209 


°161,225 


3,410 


47 




4,829,100 


24,712 


195 


221,400 


2,250 


98 


Calvert 


160,200 


995 


161 


°50,475 


1,180 


43 


Caroline 


644,075 


2,240 


288 


73 , 000 


663 


110 


Carroll 


1,276,866 


5,840 


219 


21,900 


3a2 


66 


Cecil 


1,167,44§ 


4,309 


271 


40,285 


425 


95 


Charles 


^346,500 


2,188 


158 


U16,700 


1,686 


69 


Dorchester 


1,044,900 


2,932 


356 


°106,450 


1,337 


80 


Frederick 


1.894,515 


8,146 


233 


109,560 


822 


133 


Garrett 


°549,470 


4,242 


130 








Harford 


n, 118, 050 


5,748 


195 


65,600 


898 


73 




674,350 


2,782 


242 


23,750 


663 


36 


Kent 


178,597 


1,455 


123 


24,328 


713 


34 


Montgomery 


6,297,800 


13,908 


453 


147,800 


1,906 


78 


Prince George's 


t3, 433, 100 


16,140 


213 


310,900 


3,265 


95 


562,900 


1,597 


352 


°44,600 


632 


71 


St. Mary's 


172,625 


1,257 


137 


°28,100 


806 


35 


Somerset 


*'501 , 500 


1,912 


262 


75,750 


1,377 


55 


Talbot 


520,211 


1,895 


275 


50,916 


918 


55 


Washington 


2,887,300 


12,169 


237 


47,000 


258 


182 




1,782,093 


3,756 


474 


217,692 


1,421 


153 


Worcester 


526,750 


2,136 


247 


81,950 


1,310 


63 


Baltimore City 


♦42,533,878 


75,710 


562 


♦7,593,844 


30,790 


247 


Total State 


$80,253,365 


219,471 


$366 


$9,698,443 


57,292 


$169 



X $100, 000 has been added to the county total incorrectly reported in the 1943 report, and also 
to Kent which should have read $178,597 for total value and $119 for value per white pupil. 

t No valuations are included for administration buildings, warehouses, or storage buildings. 
* Excludes value of equipment for Baltimore City. 
° Excludes value of rented buildings. 

t Excludes value of property owned by the Federal Government. 



Value of School Property, Total and per Pupil; County 133 
Tax Levy 



TABLE 115 
County Tax Levy 1944-45 



County 



Total 
County 
Levy 



Levy for Public Schools 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total 



Total Counties . . . 


$21,491,122 




1,751,268 


Anne Arundelf ■ ■ ■ 


1,841,878 


Baltimoret 


4,978,893 




130,835 




182,326 


Carroll 


518,883 


Cecil 


499,295 




cl42,052 


Dorchestert 


432,972 


Frederickt 


897,990 


Garrettt 


e384,783 


Harford 


648,892 


Howardt 


379,136 


Kentt 


227,211 


Montgomery 


f3, 534, 458 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's .... 


1,950,368 


231,039 


St. Mary's 


152,953 




222,493 


Talbot 


272,712 


Waahingtont 


1,233,093 


Wicomico 


556,549 


Worcester 


321.043 


Baltimore Cityf . . 


h54,203,253 


♦Entire State 


$75,694,375 



$8,531,626 

804,580 
a477,502 
1,353,008 
50,931 
b89 , 500 
262,544 
257,183 
c80,415 
dl68,948 
414,504 
ell5,123 
371,500 
153,851 
105,156 
1,311,141 
1,011,114 
109,040 
g60,463 
82,809 
134,972 
743,812 
247,500 
126.030 

hlO.319,873 

$18,851,499 



$1,539,111 

*262,738 
112,410 
273,681 
*14,435 
*15,935 



♦32,480 
*9 . 045 
♦49,425 
♦102,022 



26,427 
♦28,652 



f*178,727 
♦175,690 
♦15,360 
2,654 
♦8,045 
♦17,280 
♦117,525 
♦70,745 
♦25,935 

1,774,365 

$3,313,476 



$247,594 $10,318,331 



1111,840 
8.000 
600 



3,000 
3,000 
1.000 
4,400 
46,000 
1,500 
2.600 
2,625 
39,404 
18,725 



6,000 
25,200 



$272,794 



1,067,318 
701.752 
1,634.589 
66,866 
bl05,435 
262.544 
292,663 
c92,460 
d219,373 
520,926 
el61,123 
399,427 
185,103 
107.781 
f 1,529. 272 
1.205,529 
124,400 
g63,117 
90,854 
152,252 
861.337 
318,245 
156.965 

hl2, 119.438 

$22,437,769 



t For calendar year 1945. ♦ Debt service provided directly by county commissioners, 
a $24,000 transferred from capital outlay is included with current expenses, 
b Excludes bonus payment of $7,500 levied preceding year. 

c Excludes $18,000 to be received from Federal Government for schools at Indian Head, 
d Includes $24,968 for windstorm damage to schools. 

e Includes $9,180 for county bonus to be borrowed by county commissioners in accordance with 
provisions of Chapter 411 of Laws of 1945. 

f Excludes $475,000 received from issue of refunding bonds of which $235,780 is for redemption 
of school bonds due. 

g Excludes $12,000 to be received from Federal Government for school at Patapsco Naval base, 
h Excludes State and Federal aid, new improvements from bond issues and retirement of 
teachers. 



134 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 29 



PERCENT OF TOTAL 1944-45 TAX LEVIED BY 
COUNTY AND INCORPORATED TOWNS DEVOTED TO SCHOOL PURPOSES 



County 
County Average 

Charles 
Harford 
Washingtont 
Cecil 

Queen Anne's 

Carroll 

Talbot 

Prince George's 

Kentt 

Caroline 

Howardt 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Frederickt 

Wicomico 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Dorcheetert 

Montgomery 

Garrettt 

Baltimoret 

Anne Arundelt 

Baltimore Cityt 

State Average 



62.7 
53.4 
56.6 
52.9 
50.4 
43.3 
47.7 
50.3 
42.7 
48.0 
48.8 
40.0 
45.8 
43.0 
42.7 
43.8 
39.0 
34.0 
38.7 
34.5 
39.5 
32.4 
36.0 



Debt Service and 
Capital Outlay 




I 40.6 








3 5.4 


^■^H 10.4 


34.2 


■■i^H S .8 




■■■ 1 


33.0 


^^^1 10.8 



31.3 


1 '^-^ 1 


31.0 




29.8 










11,3 1 




t Calendar year 1945 



Percent of County anu Municipal Levies Used for School 135 

Purposes 



Or. 3 U 

rt" o o 



= 00 



O 13 m 
O 2 d 



a> o. 

It 



w o 'i" 00 o « oi t>o in w t- in « ""f o o t-co o eo 



• (>J Oi 00 eo (N O 05 .-I (N O C~ U3 t- « 

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o £ fl 



05 OiOOOTf OOCO"5iOOOMNt-«Ot-«ON(NeOOeO<?SNeO O 00 



ooo'-Hkom •ooiiOMOt^cavflr-imoTfmoicinm 
coiooceceo ■ oo tj< (m (n o iM lO irq co m oc im -"t cc 
t>c<jino5as ■ o o o> (N ;d r-( •«a< eo ^ o CO in t- 05 



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-5^ 



«o o e^ X — I o-xt eo X eo o ^ «o .-I o eooxN CO o o 

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»-H t> eo o 05 CO t- o X 10 rH eo 10 .-1 1-1 o CO eo t~ ;o 

eo oc~if3iox;Di-ox«i.-HrHt>inio^^05£ixeoi<T}<co 

ko x-<i<eo j2c-icou^T}',-ceo»-iT-ieoOrH6fl i-it>eoi-i 



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•^«D.-(U5.-(C-t-05OSU5C^t~;DC0C0i-lt-rfOt>C0tDO eO 

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«o i-i t-"-* 05 «3 eo t> ;c eo X t> 05 CO 05X to c~ t> X o c<i eo 

eo 10 Tf o Lft -"r to 'H o t- u5 CO 05 in «D i-i CO -"J" c o 

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O c3 



«£ixxoin-<i"cot~t>inTj<u5 
— tin^fx^cOTTco^xt-co 
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inoixeot-t^-^ineomeox 
X o «£> »-i eo X in eo.-icoo5 
to th ^ eo 



i-H Tf eo X 1-* in 05 1> eo 
o t- c- «o 05 eo ^ X 05 in 
05 o in 05 X t-H 05 CO 



xxeointoeoincocooeocoto-^xxo5eoeocoeoo>eo 
tot>05eocoxo5inc-o5X05eo.-cin;oeoino5.-i05Tf<.it 
coxxxeoxcooo>05C-Xi-ico'^eooo5-^t^oino 

^ r-i x"o coxoscocooTfxosc-Tfo.-HCOcocoeoto-^ 
inT}<c~eoxT-(05-rreoo5XTi<t>coeoineoincot-eoinco 
t>xo5— (.-iin-<}<.-iTi<xeo«oeocoino5CO'-"COCocoineo 



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0) o c 00 



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136 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 117 



Assessable Basis Taxable at Full Rate for County Purposes 
in Thousands of Dollars 

{Data Furnished by State Tax Commission) 



County 


*1923 


♦1928 


1938 


1942 


♦1943 


♦1944 


Total Counties 


$661,725 


$883,508 


$1,025,573 


$1,311,959 


$1,406,963 


$1,431,211 


Allegany 


69,886 


80,715 


*83 , 160 


96,217 


96,661 


95,483 




30,692 


47,544 


*55,750 


62,842 


65,137 


69,567 


Baltimore 


104,232 


157,654 


199,908 


304.163 


359,802 


359,748 


Calvert 


4,427 


5,305 


6,181 


7,200 


7,436 


7,316 


Caroline 


14,027 


15,283 


*14,813 


♦15,464 


15,986 


16,244 


CarroU 


33,382 


39,875 


38,633 


43,668 


43,687 


43,419 


Cecil 


23 , 189 


30,408 


40,402 


47,316 


51,873 


53,694 


Charles 


8,394 


9,938 


10,145 


12,569 


12,806 


12,937 


Dorchester 


18,987 


21,918 


26,403 


24,878 


25,374 


25,424 


Frederick 


51,248 


65,234 


66,548 


72,025 


72,231 


72,154 




16,303 


21,653 


*19,661 


♦19,649 


19,322 


19,390 


Harford 


28,580 


39,763 


53 , 192 


62,304 


65,719 


66,056 


Howard 


15,670 


18,063 


18,386 


20,379 


20,957 


21,299 


Kent 


14,519 


16,162 


*17,062 


♦18,226 


18,254 


18,559 


Montgomery 


45,503 


77,889 


109,635 


174,794 


178,548 


181,243 


Prince George's 


33,651 


59,312 


77,260 


tll7,608 


°127,777 


n41,652 


Queen Anne's 


14,793 


16,692 


16,778 


17,877 


18,858 


18,831 


St. Mary's 


7,163 


8,289 


*9,084 


♦9,201 


10,123 


10,077 


Somerset 


10,609 


12,392 


11,920 


12,637 


12,708 


12,992 


Talbot 


16,927 


20,478 


21,682 


23,434 


23,380 


23,332 


Washington 


62,570 


72,908 


76,348 


92,324 


100,732 


101,577 




20,394 


25,092 


♦31,538 


♦35,106 


36,826 


37,169 


Worcester 


16,579 


20,941 


21,084 


22,078 


22,766 


23,048 


Baltimore City 


902,208 


1,255,978 


1,231,046 


1,298,397 


1,418,502 


1,341,061 


Entire State 


$1,563,933 


$2,139,486 


$2,256,619 


$2,610,356 


$2,825,465 


$2,772,272 



♦ Includes reassessment figures. t Includes $5,157,010 for Greenbelt. 

° Includes $5,206,661 for Greenbelt. t Includes $6,784,761 for Greenbelt, 

Calvert, Carry Houses and Maryhurst. 



ii 



Assessable Basis 



i i 
i I 

s 



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138 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department op Education 



TABLE 119 



Calculated County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates, 

1944-45 





1944-45 Calculated County 








Tax Rate for School ° 


Total 




r^rtTTVTV 
\^\^u i I 










Published 


Districts 












County 


and In- 




Current 


Debt 


Capital 




Tax Rate 


corporated 




Expenses 


Service 


Outlay 


Total 




Places 


All Counties 


$.582 


$.105 


$.017 


$.704 






Equalization Fund Counties 


.673 


.132 


.025 


.830 






Allegany 


.843 


♦.275 




1.118 


$1.68 


$.45-1.20 


Anne Arundel "f ^ 


a. 657 


.155 


a'.i54 


.966 


ml. 64, 


. 22-3 . 80 










2.10-2.39 




Calvert 


.696 


♦.197 


.007 


.900 


1.91 


.60-1.10 


Caroline 


b.551 


♦.098 




b.649 


1.15 


.25-. 80 


Carroll 


.591 






.591 


1.10 


.30-1.00 


Charles k 


C.584 


♦'.066 


.022 


C.672 


1.20 


.50-. 65 




d.642 


♦.188 


.004 


d.834 


1.30 


.65-1.25 


Frederickt 


.568 


♦.140 


.006 


.714 


1.14 


.10-1.15 


Garrettt 


e.583 




.233 


e.816 


1.50 


,15-. 85 




.710 


♦;i32 


.012 


.854 


1.40 


.04-. 09 


Kentt 


.590 




.015 


.60t, 


f 100 


.40-1.05 




.714 


♦'.124 


.013 


.851 


1.45 


.20-1.15 




.579 


♦.082 




.661 


.90 


.35-. 90 




g.582 


.026 




g.608 


1.47 


.80 




.638 


♦.062 




.700 


1.30 


.75-1.48 


Talbot 


.578 


♦.074 




.652 


1.06 


.65-1.00 




.719 


♦.114 




.833 


1.22 


.37-1.00 




.666 


♦.190 




.856 


1.24 


.40-. 95 




.547 


♦.112 


.022 


.681 


1.00 


.55-1.20 


Non-Equalization Fund, Counties . . 


.479 


.074 


.008 


.561 








.354 


.072 


.002 


.428 


i'.22 


■"'!o3 


Cecil k 


.472 


♦.059 


.005 


.536 


.90 


.40-1.33 




.538 


.038 


.002 


.578 


n.73, .95 


.85-. 90 


Montgomery k 


.719 


£♦.098 


.021 


f.838 


1.62-2.33 


.10-1.00 


Baltimore City fk 


h.754 


.130 


.002 


h.886 


2.89 




Entire State 


.666 


.117 


.010 


.793 







"Obtained by dividing county levy for schools by assessable basis taxable at full rate for count y 
purposes plus assessment of Federal housing developements. 
t Calendar year 1945. 

♦ Levied directly by county commissioners. 
Tax rate in first four columns is obtained by using 1945 a5sessment by county commissioners 
and 1944 assessment certified to county commissioners by State Tax Commission, plus assessment of 
Federal housing developments wherever k appears. 

For notes a to h see Table 115, page 133. 

m City of Annapolis pays $1.54 county rate plus $1.00 city rate. Rates in remaining 7 districts 
vary from $2.10 to $2.39 plus additional amounts for local areas. 

n Bel Air, Aberdeen and Havre de Grace pay $.73 county rate plus town rates in last column. 
Rest of county pays $.95. 



Calculated School and Published Total Tax Rates 139 



CHART 30 



County 
Co\mty Average 



CALCULATED COUNTY TAX RATE - 1944-45 - FOR SCHOOL PURPOSES 

Debt Serrlce and 



Total 
I .704 



Current 
Expense 



Capital Outlay 



Howard t 

Calvert 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundelt 

Dorchesterl 

Somerset 

Carroll 

Kent t 

Charles 

Garrett t 

St. Mary's 

Queen Anne 'a 

Talbot 

Frederlckt 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Average - Non-Equal- 

Izatlon Fund Counties 
Montgomery 

Harford 
Cecil 

Baltlmoret 
Baltimore Cltyt 
Stete Average 



.561 
'.858 
.578 
.536 
.428 
.886 

.793 



Average - Equalization 
Funa Coimtlee 


.830 


.673 










Allegany 


1.118 




Washlngtont 


.833 






Prince George's 


.851 











.538 ^ 




.472 




.3 54 


1 ] •O'^'* 




275 I 




t Calendar year 1945 

* Excludes $.129 for redemption of bonds paid by refunding bond«. 



140 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 31 



ASSESSABLE WEALTH BACK OF EACH PUBLIC SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING - 1943-44 



County- 
Total County 

Baltimore 

Montgomery 

Cecil 

Herford 

Kent 

Queen Anne's 
Talbot 
Washington 
Frederick ^ 
Prince George's 
Wicomico 
Carroll 
Allegany- 
Worcester 
Howard 
Dorchester 
Caroline 
Anne Arundel 
St. Mary's 
Garrett 
Somerset 
Calvert 
Charles 

Baltimore City- 
Total State 



$ 8,601 



13,610 
11,525 
11.521 



10.391 
8,560 
8,448 
8,294 



8,174 
8,046 
7,300 
7.180 



6,688 
6,183 ■ 
5.955 
5,596 



5.48T 
5.032 
4.571 
3.95.0 
3.364 



Assessable Wealth per Pupil; Individual Income Tax per 141 

Capita 



CHART 32 



STATE INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX PER CAPITA IN MARYLAND COUNTIES - 1943-44 



Coxinty 
Comity Average 



Montgomery 


5.89 1 


Baltimore 


■■■■■ 


Talbot 




Queen Anne's 




Anne Arundel 




Washington 




Howard 





Prince George's 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Kent 

Caroline 

Charles 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Garrett 

Baltimore City 
State Average 




.33 




142 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 120 

Parent-Teacher Associations in County White and Colored Schools 



County 



Total and County 
Average 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore 

Queen Anne's. .. . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Montgomery 

Kent 

Howard 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Calvert 

Prince George's. . 

Somerset 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Charles 

Talbot 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Cecil 

Washington 

Garrett 

St. Mary's 



White Schools 



Number Percent 



1943 



418 

28 
45 
16 
18 
6 
40 
13 



1944 



421 

30 
45 
20 
16 
10 
42 
12 
10 

8 
19 

6 
44 
11 
21 
29 

5 

8 
23 
15 
12 
19 
15 

1 



1943 



68.0 

93.3 
93.8 
84.2 

100.0 
50.0 
90.9 

100.0 
69.2 

100.0 
86.4 
85.7 
83.3 

100.0 
62.5 
69.0 
66.7 
66.7 
53.8 
50.0 
44.4 
25.5 
40.4 
18.8 



1944 



70.6 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
97.7 
92.3 
90.9 



62 
61 

59.0 
53.6 
46.2 
40.4 
28.8 
5.9 



County 



Total and County 
Average 

Cecil . 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. .. . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore 

Harford 

Carroll 

Somerset 

Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Howard , 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Caroline 

Washington 



Colored Schools 



Number 


Percent 


iy4o 


1944 


1943 


1944 




Zoo 


87 . 5 


89 . 9 


D 


b 


100 . 


100 . 


19 


19 


100.0 


103.0 


10 


12 


76.9 


100.0 


9 


9 


90.0 


100.0 


18 


20 


90.0 


100.0 


42 


41 


100.0 


100.0 


16 


14 


100.0 


100.0 


10 


11 


90.9 


100.0 


10 


11 


100.0 


100.0 


39 


38 


100.0 


97.4 


15 


15 


88.2 


93.8 


9 


14 


56.3 


87.5 


4 


5 


66.7 


83.3 


10 


9 


83.3 


81.8 


10 


8 


100.0 


80.0 


12 


9 


85.7 


69.2 


12 


12 


66.7 


66.7 


6 


5 


75.0 


62.5 


4 


5 


44.4 


55.6 





1 


0.0 


50.0 


4 


2 


100.0 


50.0 








0.0 


0.0 



* Two of these represent a separate elementary and a separate high school in nearby separate 
buildings which have a joint parent-teacher association. 



TABLE 121 



Net Receipts and Expenditures from Sources Other than County Public 
Funds for County White and Colored Schools, 1943-44 



County 


Gross 
Receipts 


Net 
Receipts 


Expenditures 
from Net 
Receipts 


Balance 
June 30, 1944 


Total 


$888,746.52 


$424,373.58 

7,740.05 
17,101.47 
118,354.94 


$271,156.29 

7,740.05 
17,101.47 
44,972.43 


$153,217.29 


Anne Arundel t* 






Baltimoret* 

Calvert 


343,542.76 


73,382.51 


Carrollt 

CecU* 


95,101.28 
128,399.71 


62,029.75 
30,341.71 
511.38 


57,498.86 
16,483.60 
511.38 


4,530.89 
13,858.11 










53,478.48 


14,323.79 
7,184.51 
1,474.33 

33,850.77 


8,669.74 
7,184.51 
1,474.33 
26,181.91 


5,654.05 










33,825.25 


■T, 668. 86 


Kent* 




756.61 
12,668.20 
6,918.96 


756.61 
12,668.20 
6,918.96 




Montgomery* 






Prince George's* 






Queen Anne's 
















Talbott* 

Washingtont* 


25,965.04 
31,424.88 
177,009.12 


17,244.26 
17,832.27 
58,416.89 
3,982.83 
13,640.86 


12,244.05 
14,598.55 
24,232.96 
3,982.83 
7,935.85 


5,000.21 
3.233,72 
34,183.93 


Worcestert* • 




5,705.01 



* Receipts and expenditures that were removed from the financial report, 
t Receipts and expenditures reported separately by the county.. 



P.T.A.'s., Other than County Public Funds; School Administration 143 

COUNTY AND STATE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
AND SUPERVISION 

The salary of a Maryland county superintendent as fixed 
in the State minimum salary schedule depends on the size of 
teaching staff and years of experience. Counties, however, may 
and in most instances do pay salaries above those in the minimum 
salary schedule. Salaries for twelve months in 1943-44 ranged 
from $3,045 in the county paying the lowest salary to $7,000 and 
$9,120, in the two counties with the highest salaries, the average 
salary being $4,815 and the median $4,400. In eleven of the 
counties salaries were higher than in the year preceding. (See 
Table XIV, page 220.) 

There were twelve counties with fewer than 150 teachers, 
two having from 150 to 199 teachers, and nine with 200 or more 
teachers. The average number of teachers per county was 230, 
while the median county had 148 teachers. The smallest county 
had 64 teachers and the largest 639. In several counties the num- 
ber of teachers was smaller than it should have been because 
there were not enough teachers available to fill vacancies. Several 
counties which would have had more than 200 teachers had they 
not carried forward a policy of school consolidation and trans- 
portation have replaced the additional problems of a large teach- 
ing staff with those of the transportation service. (See Table X, 
pages 215-216.) 

Committee Assignments of County Superintendents 

As of September 27, 1943 the State Superintendent made the 
committee assignments on page 144 for the study of special prob- 
lems, mainly of an administrative nature, which will be referred 
to them from time to time. These committees will supply in- 
formation and make recommendations to the entire group. Of 
course, the unanimous approval of the superintendents will be 
necessary for the adoption of any general policy. 

Sometimes a member of the State Department staff will 
be assigned to work with a committee on a subject in which the 
staff member has some proficiency or about which he has some 
special information. 

In general, the problems considered will be of immediate 
concern. Problems of a more general nature will be assigned 
to special committees. It is believed, however, that having 
committees composed of superintendents who live near each 
other will expedite the solution of many pressing and important 
problems. 

For administrative purposes a chairman for each com- 
mittee has been indicated, although possibly a committee may 
desire to select a special chairman for the consideration of a 
particular problem. 



144 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The Committees: 

I Mr. Kopp (Chairman) , Mr. Willis, Mr. Rathbun 
II Mr. Pruitt (Chadrman) , Mr. Broome, Mr. Hyson, 
Mr. Brown 

III Mr. Shugart (Chairman), Mr. Gwynn, Mr. Hughes, 

Miss Dent 

IV Mr. Cooper (Chairman), Mr. Wright, Mr. Fox 

V Mr. Day (Chairman) , Mr. Robinson, Mr. McBride 
VI Mr. Davis (Chairman), Mr. Boston, Mr. Fitzgerald 
VII Mr. Bennett (Chairman) , Mr. Carlson, Mr. Humphreys 

The following problems were referred immediately to the 
indicated committees and State Department representatives: 

School Cafeterias and Lunch Frograms-Committee No. 

I and Miss Amery 
Insurance and Compensation - Committee No. Ill 
Adult Education - Committee No. II, Mr. Zimm.erman, 

and Mr. Glen Brown 
Teacher Welfare — Sick Leave - Committee No. VII 

Perhaps in some instances a committee may wish the re- 
action of certain superintendents located in other parts of the 
State before submitting recommendations to all the superin- 
tendents. The State Superintendent will be glad to invite those 
superintendents to meet the committee in the State office or 
elsewhere for a conference and also to confer with any com- 
mittee himself whenever such action is desirable and possible. 

Conferences of the County Superintendents with the State Department Staff 

The conferences of the county superintendents with the staff 
of the State Department of Education were held September 
20-21 and October 22, 1943 and a number of times during the 
year preceding the special session of the legislature in March, 
1944. A number of administrative matters upon which recom- 
mendations were made resulted in later action by the State 
Board of Education. 

Changes in Certification Requirements 

Adjustments in certification requirements became neces- 
sary because of the war emergency which brought an unusually 
large withdrawal of teachers at the time there was a very small 
supply of qualified teachers available. 

CREDIT FOR EXPERIENCE MAY BE APPROVED FOR WAR EMERGENCY NON- 
DEGREE CERTIFICATES IN CERTAIN SPECIAL SUBJECTS 

The State Board of Education authorized the adjustment 
shown below in italics of requirements in the special fields for 
war emergency non-degree certificates: 

Wa/r Emergency Non-Degree Certificate in Special Subject, for which 
approximately two yea/rs of college work with training and experience in 
the special subject, or preparation accepted as being equivalent with the 
pwrpose of this certificate, shall be required. (Approved by State Board 
of Education August 1943.) 



Committee Assignments; Conferences; Certification Changes 145 

Successful experience as recommended by the State super- 
visor in the particular special field with the approval of the 
State Superintendent may be considered the equivalent of the 
preparation requirements for the War Emergency Non-Degree 
Certificate in Special Subjects. 

CREDIT FOR EXTENSION COURSES COUNTED TOWARD REQUIREMENT 
FOR CERTIFICATE 

A maximum of six semester hours* credit for an extension course or 
courses completed during any one school year under the auspices of a 
standard college may be counted toward the requirement for a certificate. 
(Approved by State Board of Education August 1943.) 

The State Board of Education passed the follov^^ing minute 
with regard to emergency renev^als of certificates in 1944, and 
with regard to waiving the summer school requirement in 1944 : 

EMERGENCY RENEWALS IN 1944 

In 1944 a certificate which is held by a teacher in service in the Mary- 
land schools and for which the full requirement has been met, may upon 
the recommendation of the superintendent, be renewed for two years 
without summer school credits. If summer school credits are presented, 
the renewal will be for the regular four-year or six-year period. (Approved 
by State Board of Education February 18, 1944.) 

WAIVING OF SUMMER SCHOOL REQUIREMENT, SECTION 156 

RESOLVED, That the State Board of Education waive for the sum- 
mer of 1944 the provisions of Section 156 of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland, 1939 Edition, pertaining to the holding of teachers' 
institutes and relating to the requirement as to the attendance of teachers 
at summer schools. Authority to waive such requirement is granted the 
Board of Education by Chapter 947 of the Laws of 1943. (Approved by 
State Board of Education February 18, 1944.) 

CREDIT FOR MILITARY SERVICE FOR FORMER TEACHERS 
WHO RETURN TO THEIR POSITIONS 

Credit for a year of teaching experience on the basis of a year of mili- 
tary service should be allowed a teacher who is available for reemploy- 
ment after discharge from the Army. This may entitle the teacher to an- 
other salary increment in accordance with a recommendation of the State 
Board of Education as of February 10, 1944 and the provisions of Chapter 
333 of the Laws of 1943, Section 95 of Article 65 of the Maryland Laws. If 
this teacher who has been in military service has not withdrawn his con- 
tributions to the Retirement System, he has a right to make contributions 
for the time he has not been teaching, and may thus receive experience 
credit for retirement purposes. (See Sections 95 and 96 of Article 65, 
Chapter 333 of the Laws of 1943.) 

Changes in Causes of Lawful Absence and Definition of Elementary School 

In order to provide for lawful absence from school for high 
school pupils who engage in work experience under the super- 
vision of the school, and to amend the definition of elementary 
school, the State Board of Education made the following amend- 
ments to by-laws on February 18, 1944 : 



146 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



By-law 46 

The following lawful cause of absence of pupils of compulsory school 
attendance age from school was added: 

8. Work meeting the following three conditions: 

(a) Done because of national, State, or local emergency 

(b) Accepted by school authorities as reason for excusing the pupil 

(c) Done with some measure of responsibility on the part of the 
school authorities 

By-law 47 

The definition of item 3 "Elementary School" was broadened by adding 
the following words in italics: 

3. "Elementary school" in the counties shall be construed to mean the 
elementary school course of seven grades; or the course of six grades in 
a 6-6, 6-3-3, 6-5, or 6-2-3 organization. 

Addition to By-Law 53 Which Fixes the Enrollment Required for Special 
Teachers in High School 

If during the war emergency any high school lacks not more than 
approximately ten pupils of the enrollment which this by-law requires 
for the teaching staff employed, the State Superintendent shall be empowered 
to distribute State aid, for one year only, as if the enrollment requirement 
had been met; provided, however, that the State Superintendent may 
extend the period for which such distribution is made if, in hi^ judgment 
the exigencies of the siiuation justify such (7c^;'o7i. ( Approved by State Board 
of Education February 18, 1944.) 

Activities of the Superintendents re Salary Adjustments for Teachers 

STATEMENT BY THE SALARY COMMITTEE REPRESENTING 
the school SUPERINTENDENTS OF MARYLAND 
TO 

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS AND THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL 
January, 1944 

A What Are The Schools Facing Because Of The Loss Of Teachers? 

1. The loss of teachers from the schools of Maryland during the war 
emergency has been appalling. The per cent of teachers leaving 
the system has been growing steadily since 1939. In the counties, 
from June 1, 1942, to December 1, 1943, a total of 2,262 teachers 
out of a total of 5,287 has left. This number does not include 
those teachers who have transferred from one county to another 
because of higher salaries. (See pages 63 to 69). 

2. Two county superintendents have already intimated that not later 
than September 1, 1944, they will be faced with the alternative 
of closing school for 2,000 or more children in their respective 
counties or of using 1944 high school girl graduates as teachers, 
provided they can be persuaded to accept teaching positions. 
These girls would be required to take charge of classes varying 
in size from 45 to more than 60. This situation is likely to 
occur in other counties also. From the standpoint of teacher 
qualification and efficiency, this step would take the State school 
system back to where it was more than twenty-five years ago. 

B Why Should The State Be Concerned About This Problem? 

1. Public education is a State function. It is the responsibility 
of the State to make it financially possible for every political 
subdivision of the State to maintain a satisfactory program of 
education. 



By-Law Changes re Lawful Absence, Definition of Elementary 147 
School, State High School Aid; Salary Adjustments 
FOR Teachers 



2. The needs of the various political subdivisions differ greatly, and 
the ability of these subdivisions to pay for educational services 
likewise differs greatly. For more than twenty years it has been 
the policy of the State of Maryland to give financial aid to all its 
subdivisions in such a way as to equalize educational opportunities 
for youth in all parts of the State. 

C What Has Been Done By The State To Provide For Adjusted Compen- 
sation To Teachers During The War Period? 

1. The State adjusted-compensation act (Chapter 739, Laws of 1943) 
provided $20 a month for all teachers receiving less than $3,000, 
from the month of July, 1943, up to and including the month of 
April, 1944. It further provided that any county paying each of 
its teachers $140 over and above the State minimum scale between 
July 1, 1942, and January 1, 1945, would be reimbursed to the ex- 
tent of $27 per teacher for that period. The $20 a month payment 
from the month of July, 1943, up to and including the month of 
April, 1944, was to be paid to the county boards of education; the 
$27 reimbursement, however, was made payable to the County Com- 
missioners and to the City of Baltimore. The total amount pro- 
vided by the Governor and the State Legislature for these purposes 
was $1,900,000, including about $200,000 representing the amount 
for the contingent payments of $27 per teacher. 

D What Have The Counties And Baltimore City Done? 

1. During the school year 1942-43, which was before the beginning of 
the present State salary adjustment program, 12 counties gave 
their teachers additional compensation over and above the county 
salary scales, which in some counties are higher than the State 
mininum salary scale. The additional tax rate necessary for this 
additional compensation ranged in the 12 counties from 2 to 10 
cents. See page 155 in 1943 Annual Report. 

2. During the school year 1943-44, 22* counties and Baltimore City 
are paying additional compensation to their teachers over and above 
the regular county or city salary scales, which in some counties 
and in Baltimore City are higher than the State mininum salary 
scale. The additional tax rates vary from 2 to 11 cents to accom- 
plish this purpose. 

3. The fact that 9 counties and Baltimore City have a fiscal year 
corresponding with the calendar year and that the other counties 
vary in their fiscal years means that it is almost impossible to 
tell at any one time what is going to happen in all counties. 
This situation merely adds greater confusion and uncertainty 
as to what teachers may expect in the way of salary for any lengtn 
of time. 

4. Nineteen f counties and Baltimore City will have provided $140 per 
teacher above the regular salary schedule, the contingency pro- 
vided in the State salary adjustment act, so that they will qualify 
for the additional $27 per teacher from the State. Most of these 
counties will have met the contingency prior to July 1, 1944. Be- 
cause of the way in which the act is worded, this small additional 
sum ($27 per teacher) does not necessarily mean a continuation 
of the $20 monthly payment for even one month. 

♦The twenty-third county has just levied to pay its teachers additional compensation. 
tBy January 1945 twenty-one counties qualified for the $27 payment, all except 
Dorchester and Worcester. 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



5. From July 1, 1942, to January 1, 1945 (the period covered by the 
act), excluding those counties which will make up their budgets 
in the spring of 1944 and have not yet indicated whether they will 
continue adjusted payments through the fall of 1944, the counties 
and the City of Baltimore have paid or will pay teachers in ad- 
ditional compensation the sum of $2,139,954 at their own expense; 
undoubtedly, some of the counties will continue to give extra com- 
pensation to their teachers, which will increase this sum con- 
siderably. (This additional sum does not include the regular sal- 
aries paid by several counties and Baltimore City in excess of the 
State mininum salary scale.) In other words, the local subdi- 
visions, although in a far less favorable financial condition than the 
State, will have done far more to alleviate this situation than the 
State, despite its enviable tinancial situation. The amounts which 
will probably be provided in the county budgets in the spring for a 
continuation of the supplementary payments, regardless of what 
the State does, will almost certainly total several hundred thousand 
dollars more. In addition to the extra compensation paid teachers, 
the local subdivisions have also provided additional compensation 
to other employes. 

6. Following is a list of the counties which have been paying extra 
county funds in addition to the State adjusted compensation, hut 
tvhich as yet have made no provision beyond July 3, for a 
continuation of their payments. On April 30, 1944, teachers in these 
counties will receive a cut of $20 monthly when the State adjusted 
salary payment stops. 

All these counties except three will have levied more than the $140 
additional per teacher which is the prerequisite for receiving the 
State's $27. Unless these counties use these funds to make up for 
the discontinuance of the State payments and continue their county 
payments beyond July 1, 19 UU, their teachers will lose both State 
and county adjusted salary compensation on September 1, IQIflf. 



Table 70 on page 79 shows the emergency adjustments made 
during the school year 1943-44 from State funds in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 739 of the Laws of 1943 and Chapter 
3 of the Special Session of 1944 and from county funds. County 
funds made available in 1942-43 appear on page 155 of the Seventy- 
seventh Annual Report of the State Department of Education. 

What Other Conditions Influence The Program For Adequate Adjusted 
Compensation For Teachers During The War Period? 

1. The chief additional cost for schools during an emergency period of 
generally high wages is teachers* salaries. Unless teachers' salaries 
bear some fair relationship to the general income of the public, it 
is impossible to staff the schools with properly qualified teachers. 



Cecil 
Charles 
Montgomery 
Prince George's 



Queen Anne's 



Somerset 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



2. There are many persons trained and qualified as teachers who are 
not now teaching because the salaries are low. It would be unfair to 



Need for Salary Adjustments for Teachers 



149 



say that adjusted compensation would take care of the situation 
entirely, but it would help a great deal. Many of these people 
would prefer teaching to their present occupations, were the salaries 
for the two positions equal or commensurate. 

3. The State must be concerned with the professional leadership in its 
schools. Those of middle age or more are likely to remain in their 
positions because of their equity in the retirement system and be- 
cause of the uncertainty of new positions taken in war times. 
Such teachers should not, however, be permitted to become dis- 
satisfied with their profession, particularly as they exert a tremen- 
dous influence upon youth who are considering entering teaching as 
a profession. 

4. Very few high school graduates are entering the teachers colleges 
for training to become elementary teachers nor are many enrolling 
in the education departments of the liberal arts colleges with a 
view to becoming high school teachers. 

5. Chiefly it is the younger teachers who are leaving the system and 
it is they v/ho should be the leaders of the profession ten and 
fifteen years hence; instead they may be permanently lost to the 
teaching profession. They have little stake in the retirement system; 
they are well trained and are able to compete with the best in other 
fields of endeavor, even in normal or depression times, and they have 
no desire to place themselves in the position of being suppliants. 
(The present basic State schedule for teachers is far out of line 
with the present living expenses of teachers.) 

6. Teachers patriotically have carried a load as heavy as any group 
during the war period. War work has been school work, as illus- 
trated in rationing, registering men for Selective Service, caring for 
relief needs, helping the delinquent cases, engaging in community 
war work, selling war bonds and stamps, engaging in Red Cross 
work, taking an active part in civilian defense work, conducting 
salvage campaigns, carrying oversize classes, etc. 

7. The present uncertainty about future salary policies is just another 
factor afl'ecting teacher morale. Over a period of time it is inevi- 
table that pupil morale is afl'ected by the teacher's attitudes, frame 
of mind, and feeling of security. 

What Are Some Significant Facts About The Fiyiancirig Of Schools 
From State And Local Funds? 

1. In times of great industrial prosperity the greatest source of tax 
income is individual and corporate income, and not real estate, 
which is relatively stable. Tax on income is restricted to the 
Federal Government and to the State. The county commissioners 
and the Baltimore City Council have practically no sources of income 
for schools other than tax on real estate. 

2. During the twenty-one-year period from 1922 to 1942 the counties 
and Baltimore City made capital outlays for schools totaling 
$73,924,492, to which the State contributed not a penny. Some of 
this capital outlay came from Federal grants, particularly during 
the years 1933-1940, but the counties and Baltimore City themselves 
bore a large share of the burden of this expenditure of nearly 
$74,000,000. The entire cost for new construction of school build- 
ings and their equipment falls upon the local units. During the 
school year ending July 31, 1942, the counties and the City of 
Baltimore made capital outlays of $1,699,579.49. 



150 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



8. Most of the counties and the City of Baltimore are still obligated 
for principal payments and interest on bond issues for years to 
come. The average amount of school bonds outstanding for all 
counties and Baltimore City was $125.90 per pupil belonging, and 
interest jmyments amounted to $5.40 per pupil belonging in 1941-42. 

4. The Maryland schools do not receive an excessive share of the 
public money. As a matter of fact, the increase in the amount 
devoted to public education in the State has not kept pace with 
other governmental expenditures, nor with the increased burden 
imposed upon the schools. This, too, despite the very generous 
increases that have been made in State appropriations during 
the past few years. In 1922, when the equalization fund came 
into existence, but a year before it began to function, the public 
schools received $2,783,703 from the State, or 20 per cent of total 
State expenditures from general and special funds, excluding loan 
funds. In 1942-43, the State public school budget was $7,881 ,748, or 
14.6 per cent of the general and special funds in the total State 
budget, a decrease of 5.4 per cent.* 

G Has The State Resources For Continuing The Twenty-Dolla/r-a-Month 
Salary Adjustment Payment To All Teachers! 

1. It is generally understood that there are sufficient State funds 
available for the uninterrupted payment of the adjusted teachers' 
salaries. 

2. The statement that Maryland now is well able to provide for the 
schools was made repeatedly in respect to a recent bill making 
Federal appropriations for education to the states. Unless the 
states use the power of state machinery to raise funds for the 
schools to meet present conditions, the only alternative will be 
the use of Federal machinery to provide funds which such local 
units as counties and cities can not raise through the tax on 
tangible property. 

3. The State is financially able to meet this responsibility: The 
report of the Treasurer of the United States on the income taxes 
paid by the various States to the Federal Government in 1941 
indicates Maryland's relative position among the states in ita 
ability to pay for the costs of government as follows : 

a. Only 7 states {including the District of Columbia) had a 

higher percentage of their population paying Federal in- 
come taxes. 

b. Only 14 states, regardless of population, had more persons 

paying Federal income taxes. 

c. Only 11 states paid a larger amount of Federal income taxes. 

4. Since the beginning of the fiscal year, July 1, 1943, the State has 
had increased tax receipts sufficient to cut the State income tax by 
fifty per cent (50%). 

5. There is considerable argument for increasing Federal taxes to 
avoid inflation, at the same time that there is argument for lower 
State and local taxes. The danger in these arguments is that 
lower State and local tax income means a curtailment in State and 
local governmental functions, while greater Federal tax income 

•The percentaee for 1948-44. whp" th<^ State budp-et includes a temporary adjustment 
for teachers' salaries, is 18.5 still 1.5 loss than in 1922. 



Need for Salary Adjustments for Teachers 



151 



means a greater financial ability on the part of the Federal Govern- 
ment to absorb or to duplicate State and local governmental func- 
tions. Shall the State abdicate its own taxing authority to the 
Federal authorities? 

BASIC PRINCIPLES THAT SHOULD GOVERN IN PROVIDING 
ADJUSTED COMPENSATION 

1. Any adjustment should cover the entire period of the 
emergency, thereby avoiding confusion and uncertainty. 

2. The adjusted compensation allov^ed by the State should 
be at least the amount now granted. 

3. The adjusted compensation granted should continue 
after April 30, 1944, 

4. There should be no contingency imposed upon the coun- 
ties and the City of Baltimore to raise additional a- 
mounts for the same purpose. The amount provided by 
the State, unless it is greatly in excess of the amount al- 
ready provided, will not itself be sufficient to care for 
the situation, and the counties and the City will be re- 
quired to raise more. They can be trusted to meet this 
responsibility; the record speaks for itself. 

5. The needs for educational services in the various coun- 
ties and the ability of the counties to pay for these needs 
vary greatly ; if the State should assume the cost of basic 
State needs, the counties and the City will pay in accord- 
ance with their needs and their abilities. 

6. Any salary adjustment should not end prior to the time 
the Legislature can take action; payments ending Jan- 
uary 1, 1945, would cause an interim during which 
teachers would not receive the extra compensation, as 
the Legislature at its regular session can not act prior 
to January 1, 1945, and can not grant retroactive pay. 

7. If education is a State responsibility, the State must 
meet the responsibility. If it fails to do so, the people, 
who want adequate education for their children, will look 
to the Federal Government for it, as they have looked to 
it for other services. 

THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS REQUEST FOR ACTION IS TO ELIMINATE 
UNCERTAINTY FROM THE TEACHERS' MINDS SO THAT THEY MAY CONTINUE 
THEIR EFFECTIVE SERVICE WITH AS LITTLE DISTRACTION AS POSSIBLE 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

In line with the foregoing facts and principles and in 
view of the seriousness of the situation, the school superintend- 
ents of the State respectfully request the Board of Public Works 
to grant sufficient funds to the various political subdivisions to 
continue to July 1, 1945, exclusive of the months of July and 
August, 1944, the present State adjusted compensation to 
teachers. 



152 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The school superintendents further respectfully urge 
that the Governor of the State immediately call a special session 
of the Legislature to meet the exigencies of the situation, if the 
Board of Public Works does not provide the funds requsted. 

CHAPTER 3 SPECIAL SESSION OF 1944 CONTINUED SALARY ADJUSTMENTS 

The Special Legislative Session called by the Governor 
in March 1944 for the specific purpose of meeting this crisis 
enacted Chapter 3 which provided for teachers, attendance 
officers, and supervisors receiving less than $3,000, twelve pay- 
ments of $20 per school month between May 1944 and June 1945, 
the State to provide for nine of these twelve payments or $180. 
Each county was required to notify the Board of Public Works 
of its arrangment to pay the remaining $60. The State set aside 
$1,530,000 as its share of the cost of this law- 

New Edition of the State Public School Laws 

In July 1944 the State Department of Education published 
the first complete edition of the Public School Laws since 1927. 
This is based on the Annotated Code of 1939 and the 1943 supple- 
ment. References to Opinions of the Attorney General as well as 

the by-laws of the State Board of Education are included. The 
new edition has received much commendation. 

Radio Broadcast Service 

On February 10, 1944 the State Superintendent of Schools 
was authorized by the State Board of Education to take immedi- 
ate steps toward the establishment of non-commerical, education- 
al frequency-modulation radio-broadcast service throughout the 
State of Maryland, said service to be inaugurated at the earliest 
practicable date. 

To the end that the State of Maryland may be assured of 
adequate technical facilities for accomplishing this objective, 
the State Superintendent of schools is further authorized: 

(1) To determine, immediately, the optimum number, locations, 

and spacing of educational broadcast stations and studio 
facilities, together with point to point communications 
facilities for the inter-station transmission of programs, 
for providing proposed educational-broadcast service to all 
parts of the State; 

(2) To employ whatever qualified engineering counsel may be 

needed in order to make this determination; and 

(3) To take such steps as may be necessary in order to obtain 

access, for the Maryland State Department of Education, to 
the desired transmitter locations. 

The State Superintendent of Schools is authorized and 
instructed to apply to the Federal Communications Commission, 
at the earliest practicable date, for construction permits and 



Teachers' Salary Adjustments; New Edition of Laws; Radio 153 
Broadcast Service; Rationing; School Lunches; War 
Bonds and Stamps 

licenses for whatever number of non-commerical educational 
FM broadcast stations is considered necessary for the establish- 
ment of the proposed educational broadcast service. 

A survey made by Dr. R. R. Lowdermilk of the U. S. Office 
of Education indicated the need for five sub-stations located in 
such a way as to cover the State. 

School Cooperation with the War Effort 

Officials of various government departments asked the 
cooperation of the school officials and teachers in the following 
activities to help the war effort : 

rationing 

The Office of Price Administration requested services of 
teachers in issuing Ration Book No. 4 in December 1943. Nearly 
2,000,000 books v^ere issued throughout the State in the after- 
noons and evenings of the period advertised for each county and 
Baltimore City. The school staff was made cognizant of the 
opportunity offered by the presence of all of the public in the 
school for building better public relations. 

SCHOOL lunches 

Participation of the schools in the school lunch program 
for v^hich there is a Federal Fund for the country of $50,000,000 
as well as the possibility of using surplus commodities was re- 
quested by the War Food Administration of the Department of 
Agriculture, The amount which Maryland could have would 
be approximately $500,000. An amount of 9, 7, or 5 cents is 
granted as a subsidy toward the cost of each lunch of a specified 
kind sold. The purpose of the plan is to give each child a nutri- 
tious lunch and to develop a desire for food which will stimulate 
food demands and greater food production. Approximately one- 
third of the counties participated in the Federally aided program. 

Miss Elisabeth Amery, State Supervisor of Home Econom- 
ics, brought up the need of consideration of various essential 
elements in connection with a school lunch program, viz., proper 
selection of foods ; labor and wages of the necessary staff ; equip- 
ment; sanitation, i. e., hot water supply for dish washing and 
adequate garbage disposal as prescribed by regulations of the 
Health Department. In many schools members of the Parent- 
Teachers Associations canned fruits and vegetables for use in the 
school lunch program. This was a great help when food was high 
in cost and scarce in quantity. 

sale of war bonds and stamps 

The public schools of Maryland made an outstanding record in 1943- 
44 by investing nearly $9,252,000 in War Bonds and Stamps. The total for 
the counties was over $5,000,000, an average of $28 per pupil. The schools 
are to be congratulated on their excellent achievement. 



154 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



War Bonds and Stamps Sold by Public Schools of Maryland 1943-44 



County Amount 

Total Counties $5,064,267.71 

Allegany 119,884.90 

Anne Arundel 407,732.90 

Baltimore 1,453,521.55 

Calvert 9,600.00 

Caroline 50,300.61 

Carroll 152,931.95 

Cecil 85,985.27 

Charles 57,946.90 

Dorchester 29,533.45 

Frederick 266,574.05 

Garrett 29,436.99 

Harford 165,534.10 

Howard 82,673.95 

1 Kent 35,671.85 

il Montgomery 1,042,095.65 

•! Prince George's 417,380.00 

j! Queen Anne's 41,948.35 

il St. Mary's 35,278.20 

id Somerset 41,124.05 

It Talbot 87,000.00 

j; Washington 205,962.00 

K Wicomico 215,861.69 

!J Worcester 30,289.30 

III; Baltimore City 4,187,560.70 



jiii Total Entire State $9,251,828.41 



i" PROVISIONS FOR ACQUISITION BY BOARDS OF EDUCATION OF PROPERTY OP 

III NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION 

|! Under date of August 12, 1943 county superintendents 

j! were notified of provisions under which it was possible to obtain 

surplus available facilities and equipment of the National Youth 
Administration if they can be used for the vocational education 
program during the war or post war period. Such facilities and 
equipment included machine shop, sheet metal, woodworking, 
auto mechanics, radio, electricity, home economics (food and 
clothing) , office machines, and other items. The boards of educa- 
tion in the counties and Baltimore City could make use of the 
facilities and equipment for the following : 

a. Preemployment or supplementary war production training 

b. Trade extension in the adult evening school program 

c. Cooperative part-time education with vocational high school 

or apprentice groups 

d. Rural war producton training 

e. Regular vocational high or trade-school programs 

Allegany County was the only one which met the require- 
ments and obtained the equipment available. Washington County 
obtained the N. Y. A. equipment desired by purchase. Equipment 
obtained by the University of Maryland is used by the high school 
students of Prince George's County. 



War Bonds and Stamps; NYA Equipment; Transportation; 155 

Equipment 

Problems of Transportation 

As of September, 1943, matters relative to school bus 
transportation were assigned to Mr. D. W. Zimmerman, Super- 
visor of Special Education. In addition to a study of school bus 
contracts, it was necessary for him to cooperate with the Office 
of Defense Transportation in approving all requests from the 
counties for gas and new equipment. Maryland was thus able to 
get its fair share of new buses to replace those unsafe or out of 
use too much because of need for repair. 

It was the supervisor's responsibility to help the counties 
to develop a preventive maintenance program to keep old buses in 
operation. Because of the shortage of tires and essential parts, 
which could only be released by obtaining certificates from local 
rationing boards, it was necessary to promote the conservation of 
tires by every means possible and recapping at the appropriate 
time. The supervisor helped bring about the release of essential 
equipment when it was found to be absolutely necessary to keep 
buses in operation. 

The Office of Defense Transportation studied the report 
from each county regarding each bus route in order to eliminate 
non-essential or dead mileage ; to double up on bus routes when 
possible; and to eliminate short runs where buses were making 
trips to pick up pupils who lived a mile or a mile and a half off 
the main routes. The new regulations required these pupils to 
walk to the main road. 

Every county was asked to send in a copy of safety prac- 
tices in connection with school transportation which had been 
prepared for school bus operators and for pupils. This material 
was analyzed and used as a basis of setting up tentative standards 
to be promulgated for all of the counties. 

Applications to the War Production Board for Equipment 

During the year the War Production Board provided a re- 
vised form to use in applying for 52 items of equipment which 
formerly required twenty different forms and requested that the 
applications be designated as for a "Government Division". 

Because of the paper shortage, the Government has limit- 
ed the amounts and kinds of paper publishers can use. This may 
make it impossible to fulfill contracts for textbooks. Commission- 
er Studebaker advised the contracting parties to consider adjust- 
ments in provisions relating to quality of paper, price, number 
of copies, etc. to insure XI) the continuous supply of the largest 
possible quanity of textbooks and other instructional materials 
using paper, and (2) the least possible interference with the 
efforts of the Government to make available an adequate supply 
of paper for military purposes. 



156 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
Participation in Maryland Educational Conference for Post-War Organization 

At a meeting of college presidents, educational representa- 
tives, and Dr. Ernest Hollis from the U. S. Office of Education 
on February 29, 1944 held at Johns Hopkins University, Father 
Bunn, President of Loyola College, was authorized to call a meet- 
ing for the purpose of forming a state-wide organization to meet 
post-war educational problems. 

Approximately 150 representatives of professional and 
graduate schools, liberal arts and junior colleges, teacher train- 
ing institutions, vocational, secondary and elementary schools 
(public, private, and parochial), adult education, rehabilitation 
and veterans' administration and public health, met on March 25, 
1944 at Loyola College to organize the Maryland Educational 
Conference on Post War Organization. Father Bunn was elected 
Chairman, Dr. Pullen Vice Chairman, and Prof. Glen D. Brown, 
Secretary. The post-war problems center about the following 
three questions: 

1. How may our schools fit into the immediate and anticipated very 
important program of educating returning veterans? Also how 
may the schools meet education and training needs in regard to 
conversion of war workers to peace time occupations? 

2. It is fundamental that education and training matters shall be 
channeled through established educational agencies. It is essential, 
therefore, to have decisions on the question as to whether education 
shall be handled by established educational agencies on national, 
state and local levels, or by non-educational Federal agencies 
usurping State and local prerogatives. 

3. What are some of the urgent problems confronting us now and in 
the post-war period and how may the schools contribute to education 
and training needs in meeting these problems? 

The National Conference of State School officers had 
recommended that in each state there shall be designated or creat- 
ed a duly authorized State educational agency which shall be 
broadly representative of the various levels and types of educa- 
tion within the state. Among the functions of such a state educa- 
tional agency should be the following : 

1. To furnish lists of approved educational and training institutions 
equipped to offer training to veterans. 

2. To advise and assist the approved educational and training institu- 
tions in furnishing training to veterans. 

3. To determine, subject to policies to be established on a national 
basis, the amount of payments to the educational and training 
institutions furnishing training to veterans. 

4. To provide educational and vocational guidance. 

Among the many problems facing schools in the education 
of veterans and civilians the following are typical: 

1. There must be a wide range in the educational offerings fcxr 
adults on all levels—college, secondary, vocational, including part- 
time education in agriculture, trade, industry, distributive and 
other occupations. 

2. Many mature men with certain definite types of education will want 
re-training and many will need rehabilitation. 

3. There will be need for special classes for veterans and other 
adults who differ psychologically from younger students. 

4. More than ever, there will be need of sympathetic and understanding 
instructors. 



Postwar Organization for Education; Supervision of White 157 
Elementary Schools 



5. There will probably be need for "short cuts" in instruction for 
mature students, but there should be no lowering of standards, 
although possibly changes in traditional standards. 

6. There will be evident shifting from course to course, restlessness, 
and lack of proper guidance. These matters must be given due 
consideration. 

7. There is need of restoring teacher training to a position of im- 
portance. 

TABLE 122 



Number of Supervisors in Maryland Counties for Varying Numbers of 
White Elementary School Teachers, 1943-44 



Number of 


Number o f 






White 


Supervisors 


Number of 




Elementary 


Allowed 


of 


Names of Counties 


Teachers 


by Law 


Counties 




Less than 80 


1 


12 


Calvert, Caroline, Charles, Dorchester, Howard, Kent, 
Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, 

Worcester 


80 to 119 


2 


3 


Cecil, Carroll, Garrett 


120 to 185 


3 


3 


Anne Arundel (2), Frederick (2), Harford (2). 


186 to 235 


4 






236 to 285 


5 




t* Washington 


286 to 335 


6 


3 


t Allegany (5), ° Prince Georges's (4). 
x°t* Baltimore (6.2), *tMontgomery (4.5). 


336 to 385 


7 


1 



The number of supervisors actually employed in October, 1943, is shown in parentheses for 

counties which employed fewer than the minimun number required by law. 
* Includes a supervisor of music, 
t Includes a supervisor of art. 

° Includes a supervisor of physical education and health, part time. 
X Includes an assistant superintendent in charge of curriciilum and instruction. 

State Supervision of White Elementary Schools 

The State Supervisor of Elementary Schools held four 
one-day conferences of groups of county elementary school super- 
visors in September and October, 1943, at Salisbury and Frost- 
burg State Teachers Colleges, Upper Marlboro, and Westmin- 
ster with the following program : 

I. Information concerning the i child which is significant in our program: 

1. What information concerning the child is of importance to us in 

our school program? 

2. Where and how can we secure the information we need? 

3. How can we make best use of such records as cumulative record 

cards, reports, age-grade studies, health records? 

The new elementary cumulative record card which had 
been under discussion for two years preceding was introduced 
for use with first and seventh grade pupils in the fall of 1943. 
Detailed plans for methods of collecting information and for the 
types of information desired were made available to the Super- 
visors by the State Department office. 

II. The child's place in our program: 

1. What part can the child have in making and carrying out his school 
program? 



158 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

2. How are we arranging our program to give the child: 

a. Activities important to him 

b. The skills and techniques he needs in attacking problems 

c. Opportunity to solve problems which he faces in his own present 
or will face in future living? 

III. Reports on new undertakings for this year 

IV. Suggestions for future meetings. 

At the close of the year in June 1944, Miss Alder, State 
Supervisor of Elementary Schools, asked supervisors to send in 
plans for 1944-45 in v^hich they would consider the following: 

1. The educational direction that is expressed in the program. 
Consistent and long term influences build definite traditions in a 
system of education. They are expressed in curriculum planning, 
pupil-teacher relationships, school-community relationships, and 
the goals toward which the teachers and pupils are working and 
about which they are enthusiastic. 

2. The procedures to be used in carrying along the program. 

The procedures emphasized by the supervisors and the teachers in 
carrying out the program determine, in a large measure, what the 
program will produce. Procedures include the part pupils and teach- 
ers take in developing plans, standards and evaluations; the place 
of the skills, the way content is selected; the use of materials; and 
ways of making the program significant to all children. 

3. The professional goals planned in connection with the program. 
Professional goals may include: The adjustment of new teachers; 
the selection of materials and supplies; the use of standardized 
tests; making analytical studies of conditions; means of having 
frequent contact with schools ; and ways of meeting problems unique 
to various schools and their communities. 

The Child-Care Program 

The Child-Care program for services to pre-school children 
(ages 2 to 6) of working mothers was recognized by the State 
Board of Education in March 1943 by the appointment of a 
State Child Care Consultant. The program is sponsored, in most 
cases by the local boards of education which have appointed 
county Child Care supervisors. An activity program is given the 
children in addition to care of their physical needs. The program 
is financed by Federal Aid from Lanham Act Funds for cost of 
equipment and for the major part of the cost of operation. The 
remaining operation costs, from $3 to $5 per week, are paid by 
the parent or local contributions. The child care centers are 
housed in school buildings, private dwellings, a fire house, or 
church basements which set a good example of use of available 
facilities. 

Children are taught to take care of their possessions, to 
explore the world around them, to share materials, to be friendly 
and helpful; they are told stories and listen to music; they are 
given a daily health inspection, taught health habits, given indoor 
and outdoor play activities, rest and sleep, necessary meals at 
midday, breakfast in some cases, and mid-morning and mid- 
afternoon snacks. 



Elementary School Supervision; Child Care Centers 159 



16 



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160 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Under this program school age children of working moth- 
ers were also cared for before and after school, on Saturdays and 
during vacations. This program provided meals, physical educa- 
tion, training in arts and crafts, and opportunity to participate 
in individual activities of interest to the children. In Baltimore 
City, this program is the responsibility of the Department of 
Recreation. 

The State Supervisor of Elementary Schools held a con- 
ference of County Child Care Supervisors at the office of the State 
Department of Education on April 21, 1944 with the following 
program : 

Status of the Child Care Centers in Maryland 

Dr. Pullen, State Superintendent, and Mr. Zimmerman, 
State Supervisor of Special Education 
Suggestions for a Teacher Training Program for Child Care 
Centers 

Discussion led by Miss Clara Quincer of Goucher College 
Faculty 

Nutrition and Food Standards for Daily Menus 

Discussion led by Miss Marion Waters, Nutritionist, State 
Department of Health 
Programs for School Age Children 

Reports of what is being done in the counties 
Suggestions for Programs 

Mr. Minnegan and Miss Sammis, Acting and Assistant 
Supervisors of Physical Education and Recreation 
Discussion of Problems of Specific Centers 

Health Standards, Teacher Hours, Sanitation, Securing 
Trained Teachers 

Supervision of County High Schools 

The supervision of county high schools was cared for by 
four State high school supervisors, each of whom was assigned 
counties for which he was responsible as v/ell as the accredit- 
ing of private schools. In addition, there were State Supervisors 
of the following special subjects: Industrial arts and education 
(part-time), home economics, educational and vocational guid- 
ance, agriculture (part-time), physical education and recreation 
(part-time), and special education classes for retarded youth 
(part-time). Allegany, Baltimore, Carroll, and Montgomery 
Counties each employed a full-time high school supervisor, while 
Anne Arundel and Harford had part-time supervisors, with 
whom the State supervisors cooperated when they visited these 
counties. 

Early in the school year the following statement on em- 
ployment of school age youth prepared by officials of the United 
States War Manpower Commission, Children's Bureau, and 
Office of Education was sent to the superintendents and high 
school principals : 

employment of school-age youth 
School-age youth can aid in meeting the manpower needs in areas 
of acute labor shortage. The first obligation of school youth, however, is to 
prepare for greater future service to the nation thru continued education. 



Child Care Centers; High School Supervision; Employment 161 

OF Youth 

If critical areas observe wise standards in establishing part-time school 
and work programs, youth can play a role of increased importance in the 
war effort without personal detriment. 

The following safeguards to the welfare of employed school youth 
have been issued for the guidance of local school authorities and local offices 
of the U. S. Employment Service is formulating their own programs: 

1. Schooling is of first importance; employment secondary. 

2. In-school youth should not be included in any employment plan 
when other sources of labor are available; employment of such 
youths should be proportionately curtailed as other labor becomes 
available. 

3. All state and federal child labor and school attendance laws and 
regulations should be respected. 

4. Students under fourteen should not be employed as part of the 
labor force (i.e., in nonagricultural, commercial, or industrial 
work) . 

5. Students fourteen and fifteen years old should not engage in any 
work that would preclude a regular and complete school schedule 
of class work and study, or in manufacturing companies. Maximum 
hours of employment on school days should be three, with a weekly 
total of eighteen hours during school sessions and forty hours week- 
ly during holidays and vacations. 

6. Students sixteen and seventeen years old should not exceed four 
hours of employment on school days, twenty-eight hours weekly 
during school sessions and forty-eight hours when school is closed. 
No evening employment beyond 10 p.m. should be allowed. 

7. Work and age certificates should be required, also consent of parents 
and evidence of physical fitness. 

8. Prevailing wages should be paid as for adults. 

9. Healthful working conditions should be provided and freedom from 
hazardous employment. 

10. The U. S. Employment Service should contact employers in the 
community, determine their job requirements, and examine working 
conditions. A school representative should follow up students on the 
job to determine the probable effect of the work on school progress, 
health, and well-being. 

WORK EXPERIENCE ON FARMS 

The following provisions for attendance and scholastic 
credit for emergency work experience on farms were adopted for 
Maryland county schools: 

1 No minimum number of days in attendance can be fixed as a basis 
for determining promotion. Individual circumstances must be con- 
sidered in all cases. 

2 Scholastic and attendance credit will continue to be given as in the 
past for pupil participation in regularly established and approved 
high school work-experience programs. 

3 The only conditions under which attendance credit can be allowed 
for emergency farm work are 

a When such work is under the supervision of the teacher in voca- 
tional agriculture and is properly considered as a phase of the 
training in that subject. 

b When pupils who have reported to school are sent out in groups 
for emergency work under the supervision provided by the school 
principal. 

c When the principal, by means of a shortened school day or by 
schedule adjustments, makes possible a pupil's being present for 
his regular school work. 



162 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

4 High school pupils as well as elementary pupils who are marked 
absent because of emergency work on the farms will be given 
scholastic credit commensurate with make-up work accomplished. 

Policies of High School Supervisors in 1943-44 

The policies emphasized for the county high schools in 
1943-44 were based on adapting and strengthening those initiated 
in 1942-43. 

The Victory Corps, designed to be the overall framework 
for all wartime secondary school programs, was more active in 
some schools than in others. The form involving organization and 
insignia for carrying on the program of activities necessary to 
adapt to the war situation was less important than carrying on 
the activities themselves which the corps was designed to foster. 

The Pre-Induction Vocational Training pamphlets issued 
by the War Department stressed understanding the issues of the 
war, realizing the nature of military life, becoming physically 
fit, securing a command of basic language skills, developing 
satisfactory accuiacy and assurance in arithmetic, and acquiring 
a basic occupational skill. The regular pre-induction one-sem- 
ester courses in the fundamentals of shopwork, machines, elec- 
tricity, radio and automotive mechanics and courses in pre-flight 
aeronautics continued in a number of schools. (See Table 39, 
page 49). They were particularly useful for pupils who would 
not ordinarily take physics or chemistry. New pre-induction 
vocational training publications in Auto Mechanics, Machine 
Shop Practice, Air-craft maintenance and Electric Signal Com- 
munication (PIT.Nos. 331-334) were released in the fall of 1943. 

Pre-induction training outlines of Army Clerical Proce- 
dures and materials on the work of the army clerk as well as 
outlines for Driver Education became available in the spring of 
1943. From November 1943 to January 1944 Education for 
Victory included rather complete pre-induction suggestions for 
"Guiding Youth for Army Service", in the basic fields of language 
communication and reading, history, and the social studies, health 
and mathematics. 

The Navy stressed the following courses for high schools : 

1. Thorough physical conditioning of at least one hour per day and 
with emphasis on basic military drill and posture 

2. Mathematics, the more advanced the better 

3. Science, both physics and chemistry 

4. English composition 

5. Public speaking, especially for those hoping to attain commis- 
sions 

6. Mechanical drawing 

7. Shop training in manual arts 

8. Good manners 

The high school supervisors considered approving care- 
fully planned one-semester courses taught by teachers qualified 



Curriculum Policies; Adapting Program for Students 163 
Prior to Induction 



to teach them successfully in the following fields in addition to 
the pre-induction courses previously listed: 



Typewriting 

* Based on monograph My Part in This War. 
t Also may be planned as a full-year course 

MILITARY induction AND HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

The State high school supervisors sent to the principals 
early in the school year 1943-44 the following advice on the 
adaptation of the school program to the needs of students prior 
to induction. 

An amendment to the Selective Service Act passed by Congress and 
signed by the President on July 9, 1943, allows a boy to be deferred, at his 
request, until the end of the last half of his academic, year (regardless of 
time when his school year ends), if his call for induction comes during this 
last half year. This means that for some boys whose eighteenth birthday 
comes prior to February 1, a program making possible graduation in 
February rather than in June should be planned, if circumstances permit. 
It means, also, that it will be advisable to plan accelerated programs for 
boys who will become eighteen during the first semester of the year 1944-45 
or during the first semester of succeeding school years. 

In many schools a few pupils will complete their high school courses 
at midyear and become eligible for diplomas. Superintendents were advised 
to order diplomas at any time and to distribute them to pupils before they 
leave for the armed services. It was suggested that recognition be made 
of the mid-year graduates at a special assembly or other appropriate occa- 
sion, since it was assumed that they would not be able to be present for the 
regular commencement exercises. 

The few boys who may not be able to graduate before induction will 
have opportunity to complete the requirements afterwards while undergoing 
military training. 

A summary of the available opportunities for earning high 
school credits follows: 

Opportunities for Completing Graduation Requirements Prior to Ind,uction 

A Summer school work 

Summer sessions are being conducted in high schools in two or three 
counties of Maryland; also in the nearby cities of Baltimore, Washington, 
and Wilmington ; and in a number of accredited nonpublic secondary schools. 
The State Department has formulated standards and policies for summer 
school work in both public and nonpublic schools which it approves. Work 
completed in these accredited institutions may be accepted toward gradua- 
tion. 

The Department will be glad to recognize work done in out-of-State 
summer schools which are approved by the proper agencies and will gladly 
furnish information about any of these schools. 

During the emergency and until further notice, pupils who have fin- 
ished at least three years in a Maryland high school and are within a few 
units of graduation may complete their graduation in an approved summer 



pupils) 

Plane trigonometry (for pre- 



Review of mathematics 
Review of practical arithmetic 
Solid geometry (for pre-coUege 



fPsychology 
Latin-American relations 
Far Eastern relations 
* Consumer problems 
fHuman or social geography 



college pupils) 



(global) 



164 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



school and receive a Maryland high school diploma, provided the special pro- 
gram is approved by the principal, the superintendent, and the high school 
supervisor. 

B Adjustment of the pupiVs program as suggested in the mimeographed 
material sent out to all schools in\ February, 19^3, and reprinted in the 
April issue of *'the Bulletin of the National Association of Secondary- 
School Principals*' 

In many cases adjustments of individual pupil programs may be 
made by "doubling up," by giving special assignments, and by offering 
semester courses such as in pre-induction work, so that pupils who will 
become eighteen during the first semester of their senior year may 
complete the requirements for graduation in February rather than in 
June. 

C Opportunities for enlistment in certain branches of the armed services 
while continuing school 

The Navy V-5 and V-12 and the Army A-12 programs have pro- 
vided opportunities for selected boys to choose particular branches of the 
service and still remain in school until their graduation. Such opportuni- 
ties are likely to be continued and may even be expanded. Another series 
of examinations will be administered in November, 1943. 

Opportunities for Completins Secondary School Work After Induction 

Some few boys may not be able so to adjust their programs as to 
qualify for graduation before induction, and other boys may be so far from 
graduation that they can not complete graduation requirements before 
beginning military service. For such boys there are several channels through 
which high school graduation may be achieved. 

A Army training courses 

Provision will probably be made to allow a certain amount of high 
school credit for regular Army induction and training courses which the 
soldier takes shortly after induction while finding his place in the armed 
services. The amount of credit to be allowed has not been decided, but 
the Army Service Forces are engaged now in clarifying the problem, 
in order that school authorities may reach a decision. 

B. Armed Forces Institute courses 

The Armed Forces Institute (originally the Army Institute) is setting 
up a comprehensive program of courses on the high school and on the 
college level, which will be available at small cost to any member of 
the armed forces. Further information may be found in bulletins de- 
scribing these courses. They are approved correspondence courses and 
may be taken by the person serving iii the armed forces, regardless of 
where he is stationed, whether in this country or abroad. The State De- 
partment of Education will recognize this work toward a regular high 
school diploma ivhen thp boy concerned has left high school to go directly 
into the armed forces and when his former high school principal helps 
him plan his program with the Institute, vouches for him, corresponds 
with him, and later recommends him for a school diploma, if he completes 
all requirements. 

The Armed Forces Institute is now formulating a comprehensive 
testing program, the results of which will be available to schools concerned 
with the progress of individual boys. 

Any boy who did not go directly from high school into the service 
because he left school for work or for other reasons and later entered 
the armed forces automatically comes under the adult education program 
and may proceed to quaMfy for a State Department equivalence certificate 



Ways of Completing Secondary Work Prior to or After 165 
Induction 

rather than for a high school diploma. In this case he plans his work not 
with the high school but with Dr. Hawkins of the State Department of 
Education staff. 
C State equivalence examinations 

For out-of-school people the State Department twice a year offers 
examinations which lead to the Certificate of High School Equivaleyice, 
the legal equivalent of a high school diploma. By a recent act of the Legis- 
lature, these courses may be taken by men in the service who are seven- 
teen years of age or older, although for civilians the minimum age is 
nineteen years. This certificate will be available to men who left school 
for reasons other than to enter the service, and the Armed Forces Insti- 
tute courses will apply toivard this certificate in cases where the member 
of the armed forces has not gone directly from high school into the 
service. (See Table 123, page 164.) 

The equivalence certificate may be earned also by young men who 
went directly from high school into the service but who prefer to ftake 
equivalence examinations rather than enroll with the Armed Forces 
Institute. 

D Credit allowed for general military experience 

The Army Service Forces are working now on comprehensive ex- 
aminations to evaluate the general growth and experience gained by men 
who served in the armed forces. These examinations will be administered 
at the close of the man's military experience, when the results will be 
available to high schools or colleges which wish to evaluate the total 
experience in terms of academic credit. 

In view of the varied possibilities for deferment, program 
adjustment, and special educational opportunities in and out of 
the service, the practice of awarding diplomas to boys who leave 
during the year to enter the armed services without having 
qualified for graduation will not be continued. The responsibility 
rests clearly on the individual school to counsel with boys and to 
plan with them the transition from, school to military life. Cer- 
tainly it would not be wise to award diplomas to boys who leave 
school as early as December 1, if they would normally graduate 
in June. The induction authorities are showing by their defer- 
ment policies the viewpoint that they prefer boys to complete 
their high school courses. 

It is important that each principal and superintendent 
follow carefully previous suggestions as to adjustment, accel- 
eration, and graduation policies, including (1) classifying all boys 
under the school's jurisdiction as to their probable periods of 
induction; (2) arranging as far as possible each boy's program 
in the light of his individual needs and capacities; (3) providing 
facilities in the way of schedule adjustments for the benefit of 
the pupils concerned; (4) informing all older boys of all the 
opportunities for qualifying for the diploma and of the State and 
county policies; and (5) arranging each older boy's program so 
that, as far as reasonably possible, his call for induction into 



166 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 123 — High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 



Date 



October 1941 
April 1942 . . . 
October 1942 
April 1943 . . . 
October 1943 
AprU 1944. .. 



Candidates Examined 1941-1944 



Candidates 



Total 



New 



Examinations 



Taken 



82 
115 
114 
86 
71 
76 



Cer- 
tificates 
Issued 



1943-1944 



County 



Allegany. . . . . . 

Anne Arundel . . 

Harford 

Kent 

Prince George's 

Somerset 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Baltimore City . 
Special 



Candidates 



Oct. 
1943 



AprU 
1944 



No. of 

Examinations 
Taken 


No. of 
Candi- 
dates 


Number Who Passed Following Number of Subjects 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


October, 1943 


5 

4.... 

3 

2 : 

1 


1 

7 
6 
5 
10 


2 
3 


1 
7 


3 


3 
5 


4 


1 


April, 1944 


4 

3 

2 

1 


11 

5 
8 
2 


3 
1 


3 
1 


1 
2 


5 
5 


5 





Subjects 
in Which Examina- 
tions Were 
Taken 



No. of Examinations Taken 



Oct. 1943 



*P. *F 



April, 1944 



Subjects 
in Which Examina- 
tions Were 
Taken 



No. of Examinations Taken 



Oct. 1943 



P. 



April, 1944 



P. F. 



English I, II, III, IV. 
Gen. Mathematics . . . 

Algebra I, II 

Geometry 

Ancient History 

Modern History 

U. S. History 

Prob. of Democracy. . 

General Science 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Spanish I-II. 

German I-III 



Stenography I, II . . . 

Typing I, II 

Bookkeeping I, II . . . 

Bus. Arithmetic 

Business Law 

Business Training 

Econ. Geography .... 

Salesmanship 

Mech. Drawing I, II . 

Electricity I 

Auto Mechanics 

Machine Shop III. . . 
Agriculture I, III, IV 

Music I, II 

Art I 



*P.-Pa8sed *F-.Failed 



High School Equivalence Examinations; Diplomas to Seniors 167 
Who Transfer; Fall Report of High School Principal 

milita/ry service will come when he is one semester or less away 
from graduation. 

Issuance of Diploma to Transfers during Senior Year 

If a pupil transfers during his senior year to an approved school 
outside the State and the receiving" school feels that the pupil has not been 
enrolled there long enough to warrant graduating him, a Maryland diploma 
may be issued to him on the following conditions: (1) A sufficient pro- 
portion of his work was taken in a Maryland school; (2) he has pursued, 
after transferring, subjects corresponding to those he had previously been 
taking; (3) his work in both schools is clearly satisfactory; (4) the princi- 
pal of the school where the year is completed certifies to his former school 
that he has satisfactorily completed the year's work; (5) the principal of the 
Maryland school where he began the senior year recommends his graduation; 
and (6) the high school supervisor approves the action. 

THE FALL REPORT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

An entirely new form of the Fall Report submitted annual- 
ly to the State Department of Education by the high school 
principal which was under discussion in 1942-43 was first made 
available for use in the fall of 1943. The complete report was 
presented to principals in each area by the State high school 
supervisor. 

Part I STATISTICS of enrollment by grade, year, and sex, distribu- 
tion of class sections by size and of average daily pupil load per 
teacher, length of class period, number of periods daily and 
weekly and number of days in session. 

Part II For each TEACHER, subjects in which certificated, experience, 
salary, subjects taught and number of recitations in each sub- 
ject and all subjects, average daily load of pupil periods, and 
the daily program of each class each period with the number of 
periods a week and the number of pupils enrolled. Provision 
is made for including the extra-class and administrative re- 
sponsibilities of each teacher. 

Part III The PROGRAM OP STUDIES in the various subject 
matter fields in detail giving the year taken, whether the 
subject is required, elective, or variable, number of weeks of- 
fered, number of periods a week, number of sections, average 
size of sections and total enrollment. Space is arranged to show 
the curricula offered in the school, provision for physically 
or mentally handicapped children, remedial work in various 
subjects, courses showing a high withdrawal or failure and 
provision for evening classes. 

Part IV LIBRARY data regarding book collection showing number 
of books of each classification added and the total number; 
periodicals, pamphlets, bulletins, clippings, and the methods 
of filing them; records of supplementary learning materials 
not housed in the library ; newspapers ; room and equipment for 
housing books, magazines and its capacity; amounts and 
sources of funds spent for various library purposes; organiza- 
tion and qualifications of the library staff, periods given to 
library service; method of cataloguing books, accession records, 
hours the library is open; pupils' and teachers' use of school 
and other libraries and instruction in use of the library; 
methods of selecting library materials. 



168 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Part V GUIDANCE data regarding types of service offered in the 
guidance program; guidance classes offered by year, number 
of periods, and number of weeks for number enrolled; staff 
assigned to counseling, time given and professional training 
for guidance work; homeroom organization for guidance; 
standardized tests used by grades and enrollment; information 
on failures and withdrawals. 

Part VI The PUPIL ACTIVITY PROGRAM indicates general 
policies toward activities; control of pupil participation; 
finances and their control; homeroom organization and its 
purposes; assemblies-planning and responsibility for them by 
teachers and pupils ; student council, its activities and responsi- 
bilities; social life during and outside of school hours; school 
publications-form, frequency, cost, financing, and circulation; 
athletics-types of intra-mural and inter-school, and percent- 
age of pupil participation; musical, dramatic, and literary 
organizations-frequency of meeting, membership and produc- 
tions; clubs and miscellaneous organizations-frequency of 
meeting, membership; special events or activities. 

Part VII ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION - Provisions 
for improvement of instruction, time given, clerical service 
provided, participation of staff in formulation of plans, profes- 
sional faculty meetings and the nature of topics, professional 
study; basic office records of various types; statistics and data 
compiled for professional study; other forms used. 

Part VIII SCHOOL - COMOMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS - Policies 
for defining relationships and planning activities which promote 
relationships, parent-teacher association and its affiliation with 
State and national organizations; activities used to devel- 
op interpretive relationships, follow-up programs needing 
attention; use of community facilities and resources, guidance 
relationships, extended school services by out-of-school groups. 

Part IX SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL - Printed, mimeographed 
or dittoed material giving a complete picture of school activi- 
ties. 

Parts I and II were sent to the Department office for 
record and the calculation of State high school aid and for study- 
by State high school supervisors. Parts III to IX were discussed 
with each principal during the visit of the State high school 
supervisor as a means of self analysis by the principal of the 
school program. 

THE SECOND ANNUAL STATE-WIDE SPRING PRINCIPALS' CONFERENCE 

The second annual State-wide principals' conference was 
held April 20-22, 1944 at Towson State Teachers College on the 
theme "School Community Relationships - the Role of the Princi- 
pal in Initiating, Planning, and Directing the Program of Educa- 
tional Interpretation." 

The following Guiding Principles were formulated: 

1. A public relations program can be formulated only after a con- 
sideration of the underlying principles involved. These must be in 
accord with the immediate and long-range plans of the school and 
their relationship to the educational program of the State and 
county. 



Fall Report of High School Principal; Principals' Conference 169 
ON THE Public Relations Program ; the Guidance Program 

2. The principal should plan carefully the first steps in initiating an 
organized program of public relations. He should plan also whatever 
further steps are necessary to carry the program forward and make 
it function continuously. 

3. The public relations program should include the utilization of all 
the resources of the school and its personnel in offering such a 
variety of interpretations of the work of the school as will appeal 
to varying levels of understanding in the community. 

4. The public relations program should keep the people of the com- 
munity so well informed of the purposes, plans, achievements, and 
problems of the school that the educational program will receive 
strong and continuing support. 

5. A well-organized public relations program should provide not only 
for informing the public but for obtaining from the public reactions 
to the school program, suggestions for its improvement, and coop- 
erative school-community planning on a long-term basis. 

The principals were organized into six committee groups 
which discussed and formulated reports on : 

I. What the Public Should Know about Its Schools 
II. Enlisting Teachers and Pupils as Active Participants in 
the Program 

III. Helping to Strengthen and Engage the Natural Educa- 

tional Interests and Efforts of Organized Community 
Groups 

IV. Using All of the School's Public Events to Interpret 

the School Favorably 
V. Reporting to the Supporting Community Most Effectively 
the Purposes, Plans, Achievements and Problems of 
the School 

VI. Achieving Understanding and Support of the Schools 
Through Organized Associations of School Patrons 

Principals were informed that the best single book on the topic is 
entitled "Today's Techniques", the First Yearbook of the School Public 
Relations Program. 

The reports of the committees together with a bibliography were 
collected for later publication as a State Department Bulletin. 

An inspiring talk by Mr. David L. Gibson on School Community 
Relationships ended the conference program. 

The Guidance Program 

During 1943-44 the principals of 81 white and 14 colored 
high schools reported time given to the guidance program. This 
was an increase of 29 white and 4 colored high schools over the 
number reported for the preceding year. (See tables on page 
57.) 

The staff received aid in carrying this service by the pub- 
lication in November 1943 of A Basic Program of Guidance pre- 
pared by Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell, State Supervisor of Education- 
al and Vocational Guidance. 



170 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

The 29 page bulletin has the following Table of Contents : 
The Viewpoint 

Pupils' Problems in Which the Guidance Program Can Help 
The Planning- of the Guidance Program 
Getting the Guidance Program Under Way- 
Things to Do 

Pupil Inventory Counseling 
Occupational Information Placement 
Follow-up 

How the Guidance Program Affects the Individual Pupil Year 
by Year ^ 
How the Teacher Can Contribute to the Guidance Program 
Guidance in the Elementary School 
Checking the Guidance Program of the School 

Supervision of Colored Schools 

The State Supervisor of Colored Schools spends the great- 
er part of his time in the field working with the colored high 
school principals and teachers and the remainder in assisting the 
county supervisors of colored schools and in finding qualified 
teachers to nominate to the county superintendents, this requir- 
ing more time than in normal times because of the abnormal turn- 
over of teachers due to the draft, enlistment and work for the 
government or war industries. The State supervisor visited 
various colleges in the winter and spring to interview applicants 
for positions. 

In each of eight counties a full-time colored supervisor 
was employed toward whose salary the State gave $750. In Fred- 
erick and Talbot the part-time colored supervisor also acted 
as principal of the high school, in Caroline as principal of an 
elementary school, and in Harford and Carroll as part-time high 
school teacher. In Cecil, Howard, Queen Annes' Somerset and 
Worcester, the attendance worker also acted as supervisor of 
colored schools, in Baltimore County supervision of colored 
schools was assigned to the assistant superintendent of schools, 
and in Kent it was done by the county superintendent. 

At the conference of county supervisors of colored schools 
held August 30-31, 1943 at the Booker T. Washington Junior 
High School in Baltimore City the following was the central 
theme : 

Every activity carried on by the school should foster so- 
cially desirable learning by the pupils. Supervisors were asked to 
consider how they could help teachers promote pupil learning 
through the following : 

1. Appropriate selection and advantageous use of materials 

2. Wise use of available equipment within and without the classroom 

3. Reasonable care of the school room and school grounds 

4. Good administration in classroom procedures 

5. Choice and skillful use of satisfactory methods of teaching 



The Guidance Program; Supervision of Colored Schools 



171 



6. Preparation of well-pianned lessons 

7. Stimulating consideration of events incident to World War II 

8. Development in pupils of ability to think 

9. Testing and following up weaknesses disclosed 

10. Recognition of individual differences among pupils 

11. Promotion of respect on the part of pupils for punctuality, re- 
sponsibility, regularity, meeting obligations, tolerance 

12. Setting a good example of teacher behavior 

13. Attendance by the teacher at summer school, participation in teach- 
ers' meetings, and in study groups and conferences 

14. Reading of professional and non-professional literature 

Supervisors were asked to consider what could be done to 
bring about the following: 

1. Effective adaptation of the elementary school program to wartime 
needs and the changing social order 

2. Lessening the turnover of teachers 

3. Reduction in late entrants, irregular attendance and early with- 
drawal of pupils 

4. Arousal of interest of parents in school activities 

5. Counteraction of pupil problems which have resulted from the war 

In January 1944 the State Supervisor asked the super- 
visors to adopt the following supervisory measures to offset the 
heavy teacher turnover accompanied by the employment of many 
inexperienced poorly trained teachers : 

1. Visit weak teachers often to give help in school organization and 
management 

2. Show teachers how to analyze their instructional difficulties 

3. Recommend pertinent professional reading 

4. Recommend lessons in English and arithmetic if the teacher's schol- 
arship is weak and check the results 

5. Explain the use of various teaching procedures, one at a time 

6. Check the work of pupils with the teacher to help her evaluate her 
results 

7. Administer a test in February to measure progress and to plan for 
reteaching and remedial work so that there would be fewer failures 
and over-age pupils. 

8. Improve housekeeping inside the building and care of grounds out- 
side the building 

9. Secure cooperation of patrons in obtaining suitable comfortable 
homes for teachers to be appointed for 1944-45 

10. Appraise the work of recent graduates of Bowie teaching in the 
county and send a report to President Henry at Bowie 

Supervisors and high school principals were asked to eval- 
uate teachers holding war emergency certificates or who were 
substitutes to see whether they should or should not be retained 
the following year, advising those to be retained to plan to take 
the courses they need at summer school, and planning for replace- 
ment of those who should be dropped by well-trained teachers 
who seem to be available. 



172 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

The influence of supervisors and high school principals 
was asked in recommending the enrollment at Bowie State Teach- 
ers College of high school seniors with the necessary scholarship, 
aptitude for teaching, and desirable personality traits. 

No meeting of the colored high school principals was called 
during the year. They were sent a summary report of the work 
done by their group in studying the curriculum at Bowie State 
Teachers College in May, 1943, which was mentioned in the 1943 
Annual Report of the State Department of Education on pages 
175-6. Principals were asked to check on their offerings and ac- 
tivities in the following fields : 

Pre-induction courses 

Instruction in arithmetic for all high school pupils 
Carrying on the spirit of the victory corps designed to have pupils 
give maximum aid to the war effort 

As a result of the testing of entrants at Bowie State 
Teachers College in the fall of 1943, principals were asked to give 
more supervision to the following areas in the program : 

Knowledge and skill in the use of the high school library 
Remedial work in reading, English, arithmetic and other subjects 

Before filling in the new fall reports (See pages 167-168 
for a description) each high school principal was asked to restudy 
the Evaluative Criteria used several years before in appraising 
the work of the high school. 

In having the faculty consider the curriculum for war and 
peace time, the following conditions will exist and should deter- 
mine the school's offerings : 

1. There will be group living and members of the group should live 
amicably and helpfully. 

2. There will be need for qualitative and quantitative computations. 

3. There will be need for communication of ideas in oral and written 
form 

4. There is need for intelligent interpretation of environment. 

5. Physical fitness is a personal and social requirement. 

6. Aesthetic appreciation becomes increasingly desirable. 

Each principal was asked to send a report at the close of 
the year on the problems other than teacher turnover and lack 
of classroom space, for the year 1943-44 and those anticipated in 
1944-45. Achievements in course of study construction and in 
other fields as well as solutions of problems which arose were 
also asked for. 



Supervision of Colored Schools; Conference on School Attendance 173 

Conference on School Attendance February 8-9, 1044 
The annual conference on school attendance was held at 
Towson State Teachers College with Mr. D. W. Zimmerman, 
State Supervisor of Special Education presiding. 

In discussing Institutional Adjustment for Youth, INTr. 
Dwight H. Ferguson, recently appointed Chief of the Division of 
Institutions, State Department of Welfare, brought out that 
delinquent youngsters were first cared for in almshouses, later in 
reform schools, and still later in training schools. Now we are 
looking forward to having the training schools become child study 
centers. Behavior is a sympton, and if a child is to receive treat- 
ment for a behavior problem, a center must be set up to study the 
causes of the behavior and to recommend treatment. A normal 
child is a happy child. 

The four State training schools are now under the control 
and supervision of the Maryland State Department of Welfare. 
At present every training school is filled to capacity except that 
at Cheltenham six more beds are available. On March 1 tempor- 
ary arrangements will be made to accept for a period not to ex- 
ceed 45 days any child committed by a Court. A plan for foster 
home care after the 45-day period at the training school is now 
under consideration. 

In the past we have failed to relate a child's care to past 
experiences in his family. After boys and girls have been released 
from the training schools, they need another type of care, prob- 
ably different from what they had before entering the training 
school. This must continue until they become adjusted to society. 

The schools are the first agency to work with the child 
who becomes a behavior problem. Other agencies work with him 
after he has been released from school. In the past cooperation 
among the agencies has been the weakest link. It is hoped that 
this situation can be remedied and that we can help the children 
to become happy, normal youngsters. 

For practical commitment the training schools are asking 
for a social history, a medical report, a Wassermann test, and a 
psychiatric examination. The Welfare Department may be called 
upon to collect this information for the Trial Magistrate. 

Several counties described cases in which cooperation of 
the social agencies with the school officials was lacking. 

Following the general meeting, the group was divided into 
three committees which studied and discussed the problems as- 
signed and formulated reports which were presented to the entire 
conference the following morning. The following summaries 
bring out the salient points included. 



ii 



174 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Improving the School Attendance of Pupils Over Fourteen Years 

Since the beginning of the war period, the number of work 
permits granted to children under sixteen years of age and the 
number of age statements issued to young people 16, 17, and 18 
years old has increased remarkably as may be seen below : 

Employment Permits Issued Age Statements Furnished 

Year Baltimore City Counties Baltimore City Counties 

1939 708 102 2,208 227 

1942 5,777 542 36,010 2,208 

1943 10,677 1,091 27,181 6,300 

Types of both legal and illegal work opportunities for 
young people have increased greatly. Among the types of employ- 
ment available to school children are the following : 

a. Selling papers h. Working on farms 

b. Domestic work i. Working in coal yards, on wood 

c. Running errands trucks, and in production of 

d. Caring for shops lime 

e. Working in restaurants : j. Delivering ice 

cooking, washing dishes k. Unloading freight and truck 

f . Sweeping floors in ten cent cargo 

stores 1. Bell hopping 

g. Shining and repairing shoes m. Caring for children. 

These and other types of work may have the following 
effects upon children enrolled in school : 

1. Frequent absence from school 

2. Fatigue the day following work after school or in the evening, and 

consequent inability to do good school work 

3. Discouragement and often withdrawal from school as a result of re- 

curring absence and poor achievement. 

The causes of poor attendance and early withdrawal, in 
some cases, lie in community conditions or in the attitude of the 
child or his family, but in all too many cases the school itself must 
accept the blame. Too often curriculum materials fail to meet the 
needs of many of our children. A way must be worked out to give 
children of low intelligence the same length of time in school but 
not the same kind of schooling provided for the more intelligent 
child. If this is not done, the natural consequence is that day after 
day the children derive from their school attendance only a sense 
of futility and frustration, with the result that as soon as they can 
legally do so they withdraw from the school. The mental and e- 
motional needs of the fourteen-to sixteen-year age group must 
be taken into consideration. A special effort should be made in all 
schools to provide as soon as possible a program of guidance 
which will help children find themselves and their places in school 
and community. 



Improving School Attendance of Pupils Over Fourteen Years 175 



Partly because schools do not interpret the possible serious 
effects of irregular school attendance and of child labor, school 
patrons and the general public do not appreciate their full import. 

County superintendents who feel the need of additional 
service in the enforcement of Child Labor Laws were urged to 
request it by writing to the Commissioner of Labor and Statistics. 
In order that children interested in securing vacation, after- 
school, or full-time employment may be informed so that they do 
not violate the child labor law unwittingly, it is recommended that 
principals and teachers be furnished accurate information as to 
legal types of work and as to the specific methods of securing the 
different types of work permits. 

It was recommended that in the postwar period a well- 
planned program of education be undertaken to bring about legis- 
lation which will raise the age of compulsory school attendance 
to 18 years. It must be recognized, of course, that such a change 
will require far-reaching and thoroughgoing revision, diversifica- 
tion, and enrichment of the curriculum which is now offered. 

In Washington County in addition to provision of a more 
varied and attractive curriculum for junior and senior high 
school pupils, the following matters are considered : 

1. The most important factor in school attendance is that the child 
have an opportunity to feel that "he belongs" to the school. When a 
child is misplaced or is assigned to a teacher not sympathetic with 
him, absence from school usually increases. 

2. It is essential that within each school the principal be responsible 
for securing absentees within five minutes after the opening of 
school in the morning and also at noon. A list of children who are 
absent illegally should be prepared immediately which procedure has 
a tendency to help children realize they cannot "get by" if they stay 
away from school without good reason. On his weekly visit the 
attendance worker uses these data to determine the pupils, the par- 
ents, and the homes needing attention. 

3. Many children come from homes where there is very little coopera- 
tion from parents in seeing that children attend school regularly. 
This is a community as well as a school problem, and involves the 
cooperation of social agencies. 

4. Many businesses, such as bowling alleys and sale of newspapers 
employ young children. Employers should realize that for the good 
of the community, employment should be given only to children who 
have reached a cerrain maturity and age, and who are recommended 
by the school ol?icials. In some instances employment may be good 
for certain children. The school officials, however, are perhaps in a 
better position to consider the effect of school attendance and em- 
ployment on the welfare of individual children than the Welfare De- 
partment, Child Labor Bureau, or County Health Department. 

Coordinating School Attendance with Health and Welfare Programs 

Surveys reveal that the war has increased the number of 
situations which result in behavior problems, but has not neces- 



176 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



sarily created new types of situations. Therefore, our main con- 
cern is in finding new and better ways of working with the agen- 
cies, such as the Welfare and Health Departments, which can give 
assistance with family problems. 

It was learned that a family receiving assistance may re- 
quest from the Welfare Department suggestions concerning effi- 
cient ways of planning the family budget. Work with indigent 
families varies greatly among the counties. In many counties the 
Welfare Department is not equipped to render types of service 
other than cash assistance. And to receive financial assistance a 
personal application must be made by a responsible member of 
the family. Miss Elizabeth Smith, Field Supervisor on the staff 
of the State Department of Public Welfare, assured the group 
that additional help in child-placement, protective services and 
aid to neglected children will soon be available in every county. 
Since each county's needs and resources vary, it was felt that 
problems may best be worked out in conferences of the welfare 
executives and school officials in each county. 

Another cause responsible for unsocial behavior is poor 
health of the child or of members of his family. Teachers can do 
much to prevent smallpox, diphtheria, and other communicable 
diseases by carrying out the regulations of the Health Depart- 
ment for 

1. The complete vaccination of all school children 

2. The use of toxoid to prevent diphtheria 

3. Exclusion of children from school when the first signs of the disease 
appear. 

Dr. Halliday, Chief of the Bureau of Communicable Dis- 
eases in the State Department of Health, reported that new 
health regulations concerning communicable diseases are in prep- 
aration, and copies of the rules, when completed, will be sent 
to the counties. An example of changes in regulations are those 
affecting children with measles. After children have been in con- 
tact with someone who has measles, they may remain in school for 
a fourteen-day period, during which they must be watched care- 
fully by the teacher. 

As a result of conference with the Health Officer of Queen 
Anne's County, it was recommended that principals and teachers 
carry out the following suggestions : 

1. Uphold the diagnosi's of the Health Department 

2. Be alert in reviewing health records of pupils 

3. Sell the idea of immunization for diphtheria, smallpox, and whoop- 
ing cough. Immunization is usually in direct proportion to the teach- 
er's interest 

4. Report to the Health Department all symptoms of communicable 
diseases. 



Coordinating School Attendance with Health and Public 177 
Welfare; Devices for Improving Attendance; Better 
Interrelationships Among Agencies 

In Montgomery County a health education program in the schools 
participated in by pupils and teachers in setting up health standards supple- 
ments the vi^ork of the Health Department. The pupil must have an interest 
in and understanding of his own health. Only then will he practice desirable 
health habits while he is away from home or school. Principals must see that: 

1. A program of health is explained fully to children so that they can 
see and understand its effect on and relation to them and adopt it 
as their program. 

2. Children help plan what they are going to do by choosing and select- 
ing their health program under the teacher's guidance. 

3. Children select a specific area for which they set up a program, set 
up standards by which they are to work, carry out and help evalu- 
ate their own program. 

Devices for Improving Attendance and Actual Improvement in Attendance 

In the past devices for attaining better school attendance 
have been exploited. If they are used at all, they should be only a 
means to an end. Emphasis should be on group rather than on 
individual approval. If the devices have been used to encourage a 
desire to attend school regularly, and if the desire is still strong, 
after the devices are no longer used, they have done some good. 

The efforts of attendance workers and teachers and cooper- 
ation with the health and welfare agencies have helped to improve 
attendance, since in 1923 the State attendance average was down 
in the low 80's. Since that time it has come up to as high as 93% 
and at present fluctuates in the low 90's. Perhaps there is a 
saturation point beyond which attendance cannot improve be- 
cause of contagious diseases and other illnesses which cannot 
be avoided. 

The Need for Better Interrelationships among Agencies 

In spite of all the work that attendance workers do, there 
are bound to be children who will not fit into the normal setup. 
Many of these problem children come from families which have 
lived in our communities for years. To meet their needs more 
cooperation and coordination with all the other agencies in the 
community are needed and in addition : 

1. A coordinating council 

2. More intensive and thorough investigation of facts and causes of 

juvenile delinquency 

3. Adjustment of school curricula to meet needs of retarded children 

4. Special emphasis on the guidance program 

5. Better cooperation from Child Labor Bureaus regarding employ- 

ment of youths. 

Only after the county has tried every means should com- 
mitment and the use of the new division of Institutions in the 
State Department of Public Welfare be called upon. 



I 



178 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
Using Guidance Techniques in School Attendance Work 

Findings 

The same old problems exist but show an increase in num- 
ber. The following wartime conditions were listed as conducive 
to an increase in juvenile delinquency: 

1. Employment factors: Too much work available for minors; too much 
money unwisely spent; unwholesome working environment; desire 
for temporary gain at the expense of education; competition of high 
wages with education values. 

2. Housing and population factors : Congested housing facilities ; unad- 
justed, restless nev/comers; exploiters of youth in the community. 

3. Emotional factors: General w^ar hysteria; emotional appeal of men 
iuj uniform; let-down in legal, moral, and social restraints; tempta- 
tions of amusement places; anxiety over welfare of relatives. 

4. Inadequacies in school provisions : In some cases, lack of school hous- 
ing facilities causing too large classes, lack of fuel to keep schools 
comfortable in winter; loss of qualified teachers. 

5. Inadequacies of social forces: Lack of recreation facilities; less ser- 
vice from overburdened, undermanned law enforcement agencies. 

Recommendations : 

1. That all of us emphasize a "back to school" program, in which the 
principal and teacher cooperate and play the leading role in keeping 
the children in school. 

2. That, in the case of the newcomers, we make every effort to help 
parents and children to become adjusted in their communities. That 
we have a sincere understanding and establish "good will" with 
them. 

3. That we work in close cooperation with the social and welfare agen- 
cies. 

4. That we make every effort to improve public relations-educate the 
public or convince the public that it is essential for boys and girls 
to go to school. Show why youth need education and why the country 
needs educated youth. 

5. That we give constant stimulation to better enforcement of child 
labor and school-attendance laws. 

Education is the natural birthright of boys and girls, and 
the object of school attendance service is to help preserve for 
them their just and rightful opportunity to become good and use- 
ful citizens. 

It is normal for children to want to go to school. Most of 
them attend regularly. Frequent absence of a child is a signal that 
a careful study of the child should be undertaken. An attempt 
should be made to discover the factors that contribute to poor at- 
tendance adjustment, and, through sympathetic understanding, 
to help eliminate them. There should be sufficient follow-up to as- 
sure that the adjustment is really effected. 

The factors underlying attendance problems are generally 
found by studying the child himself, his family, the environment 
in which he- lives, and his school adjustment. The study of the child 
himself includes his health, habits, personality traits and inter- 



Using Guidance Techniques in School Attendance Work 179 

ests. The study of his family and home environment includes its 
physical, social, and moral factors; and the study of school en- 
vironment includes the philosophy of the school, the relationship 
between teacher and pupil, and whether the school program fits 
the particular child's needs. 

The teacher is in daily contact with the child and there- 
fore holds the key position in his life. Her friendly, understanding 
attitude makes her the best qualified person to study and collect 
facts about him. These data should be entered on the cumulative 
record card filed in the school and should be available for study 
in connection with the pupil's adjustment. 

Promoting the attendance program in the classroom is 
primarily the responsibility of the teacher and she must make a 
careful investigation to determine the causes of absence in each 
case. If she needs help, she refers the case to the principal or the 
member of the school staff designated to handle attendance mat- 
ters. If the school fails to solve the problem, help is requested 
from the county superintendent's office. The school should give on 
the absence report complete information about the case, in order 
that the attendance worker may proceed immediately either by 
visiting the home or, if this is impossible, by sending a letter to 
the parent. Should the attendance worker feel the information 
furnished about the case is not sufficient, a visit should be made 
to the school to clarify any factors that are not understood. Many 
times complete understanding of the case and a fair and patient 
interview with the mother, father, or both parents clears up what 
may have been a serious attendance problem. 

Since most attendance problems are solved by the princi- 
pal and the teacher and only the most serious ones are reported 
to the county superintendent's office, it is important that the at- 
tendance worker keep a brief running case history of the findings 
and of the progress made in each case. Often a serious family case 
needs following for several years. The close cooperation between 
the principal and the attendance worker and systematic follow-up 
from school to county oflice and vice versa is the key to success in 
solving the problem. Assistance is requested from community 
agencies and interested adults when necessary. 

Home visitation gives the parent an opportunity to clear 
school problems in his mind, gives a better school-home relation- 
ship and a better feeling toward education, whether the parents 
be poor or wealthy, uneducated or well trained. Most parents are 
interested in the success of their children and are eager for the 
right kind of help. 

In chronic cases legal pressure is the last resort of the at- 
tendance worker who follows a carefully planned procedure and 
has true appreciation of his work. 



180 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The New Cumulative Elementary Record Card 

Miss Grace Alder, State Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
interpreted the use of the new elementary cumulative record card, 
v^hich is being put into use in some or all elementary schools in 
1943-44. It is necessary to make a complete study of the child over 
a period of years. No one teacher can accomplish this, but each 
one can add information to the record. 

In spite of the war, the teachers have been doing a wonder- 
ful job. At least 60 per cent have remained rather then take work 
at higher salaries. It is our job to help them know every pupil. 
They need to help each child on his level. Many problems can be 
averted if teachers make the school interesting to their pupils. 

A cumulative record to make possible a diagnosis of the 
child is indispensable. Each child should have a folder, but the 
teacher should include in it only information that is already 
known to her. 

The cumulative record card should be of utmost value in 
studying the causes of poor attendance and unusual behavior. It 
should furnish the guidance teacher background material for 
use in planning with children for their future. 

It was suggested that the note at the bottom of the new 
yellow and white transfer cards be enlarged to read **When a 
pupil withdraws from a school, his large cumulative record card 
will remain in the school last attended from which it may be ob- 
tained ; of if it is filed in the office of the County Board of Educa- 
tion it may be obtained from the attendance worker." 

Wartime conditions make it necessary to add another 
cause of legal absence : 

Work meeting the following three conditions : 

(a) Done because of national, State, or local emergency 

(b) Accepted by school authorities as reason for excusing the 

pupil 

(c) Done with some measure of responsibility on the part of the 

school authorities. 

WGr. may be used for the withdrawing of a senior for 
graduation before the end of the year. The graduate should be 
counted as not belonging for the remainder of the year. 

The Forgotten Child 

Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell, State Supervisor of Guidance, who 
talked about "Our Forgotten Youth" said that guidance is univer- 
sal. Every pupil must have it. We have "Forgotten Youth"-usual- 
ly unattractive problem pupils whom many of us want to f orget- 
which creates a bigger problem, because the less attention these 



Cumulative Elementary Record Card; The Forgotten Child; 181 
Teachers Colleges 

forgotten children get, the more they withdraw. Dr. Cromwell 
gave several examples to show that a forgotten child can fre- 
quently improve his position in school and in society by a little 
encouragement and friendly attention from his teachers. 

Teachers usually talk in terms of a child's intellectual abili- 
ty rather than in terms of his abilities. ToO' often the one talent 
emphasized is the ability to interpret the printed page. This stand- 
ard of ability is much too narrow in scope. Examples were given 
of men who have been successful in life who had a difficult time 
adjusting to regular school work. Teachers must exploit the pos- 
sibilities of the pupil, so that he can realize the importance of 
what he can contribute and feel that he is successful. Larger 
areas of accomplishment need to be explored by the teachers, 
such as ability to do things and to get on ivell ivith people. Our 
estimations and evaluations of children are usually limited. We 
all need to know more and more about the possibilities of each 
pupil. One ability may be used as a ''handle" to find others. 

We cannot expect to find or to make children perfect. 
Teachers must recognize the limitations of the individual pupil 
and work from there. The keynote of guidance is to make the child 
happy. 

Dr. Cromwell ended his talk with some suggestions on 
interviewing by Patterson, Schneidler and Williamson adapted 
from School Progress, a journal published by the State Teachers 
College at Mankato, Minnesota. 

TEACHERS COLLEGES 
Admission Policies 

Recommendation of the high school principal and county 
superintendent or of the Superintendent of Schools in Baltimore 
City shall be required for admission to any one of the State 
Teachers Colleges. 

New Curricular Requirements in the Teachers Colleges 

The following basic core curriculum effective in 1944-45 
was adopted by the faculties of the State Teachers Colleges in 
conjunction with the State Department of Education and ap- 
proved by the State Board of Education November 1, 1943. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

To qualify for the degree of B.S. in education, a student must earn 
credit for four full years of work, or 128 semester hours, including the 
following courses: 



182 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Subject Semester hours 

English 

English and American Literature 6 

Composition 6 

Elective (required) 6 18 



Social Sciences 

History of Europe 6 

History of the United States 6 

Elective (required) 6 18 



Mathematics ' 3 3 

Geography 6 6 

Science 

Physical and Biological Science 12 12 

Art 6 6 

Music 6 6 

Physical and Health Education 8 8 

Education 

Educational Psychology 3 

Curriculum Materials and Methods 12 

History of Education 2 

Children's Literature 3 

Directed Teaching 16 36 

* Free Electives 15 .15 



TOTAL 128 



(* Not more than 9 semester hours in electives v^ill be allowed in any 
one subject.) 

Cadet Training Accepted as Practice Teaching 

Cadet teaching done by teachers college seniors constitutes 
the last credit necessar^^ for the degree for participating students. 
In all cases in which work had been satisfactory, credit for 
practice teaching will be considered to have been earned by Dec. 
1, 1943, and this will be considered the date of graduation. 

Experiment in Cadet Teaching by High School Graduates 

Towson was given permission during the emergency to 
plan summer school courses in 1944 for high school graduates 
from Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties who would be per- 
mitted to teach in 1944-45 with the opportunity to have instruc- 
tion on Saturday and one or two evenings a week and to be super- 
vised by the staff of the Teachers College. 

Salary Schedule for Instructors at Teachers Colleges 

A salary schedule for the instructional staff at the State Teachers 
Colleges approved by the State Board of Education was made effective as 
of December 1, 1943: 

Teachers with A. B. Degrees $ 2,000 to $2,500 

Teachers with A. M. Degrees 2,400 to 3,600 

Teachers with Ph. D. Degrees 2,600 to 4,500 



Curriculum; Cadet Teaching; Faculty Salary Schedule; 183 
Graduates 



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184 



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Home and Teaching County of Graduates; Enrollment at 185 
Teachers Colleges 

TABLE 126 



Day Enrollment at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges 



Fall of 


Towson 


Frost- 


Salis- 


Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppin 












City 


County 


burg 


bury 


County 


State 







Regular Session Enrollment 



1920 




184 


57 




241 


241 




124 


1921 




397 


101 




498 


498 




185 


1922 




506 


134 




640 


640 




225 


1923 




569 


125 




694 


694 


11 


225 


1924 


518 


602 


149 




751 


1,269 


23 


211 


1925 


411 


513 


197 


107 


817 


1,228 


36 


161 


1926 


275 


475 


201 


158 


834 


1,109 


81 


117 


1927 


268 


402 


192 


170 


764 


1,032 


104 


121 


1928 


315 


359 


178 


186 


723 


1,038 


128 


9^ 


1929 


346 


368 


173 


174 


715 


1,061 


120 


125 


1930 


298 


348 


161 


165 


674 


972 


109 


171 


1931 


348 


306 


111 


127 


544 


892 


106 


145 


1932 


289 


257 


136 


101 


494 


783 


122 


127 


1933 


230 


230 


116 


114 


460 


690 


99 


282 


1934 


178 


193 


124 


108 


425 


603 


100 


111 


1935 


193 


147 


137 


185 


469 


662 


96 


112 


1936 


284 


175 


131 


201 


607 


791 


116 


141 


1937 


290 


186 


170 


210 


566 


856 


138 


163 


1938 


340 


222 


212 


239 


673 


1,013 


177 


168 


1939 


322 


249 


223 


273 


745 


1,067 


131 


164 


1940 


277 


234 


221 


221 


676 


953 


150 


156 


1941 


210 


209 


195 


209 


613 


823 


155 


161 


1942 


172 


162 


145 


159 


466 


638 


120 


154 


1943 


141 


146 


96 


°154 


°396 


°537 


109 


130 


1944 


103 


134 


°83 


°120 


°337 


°440 


110 


134 


Summer Enrollment 


1942 


136 


137 


§417 


173 


§527 


§663 






1943 


119 


115 


154 


142 


411 


530 






1944 


77 


tl38 


76 


91 


t305 


t382 







° Includes evening and extension students. § Includes 22 taking Spanish, 
t Includes 60 high school stiidents having six weeks instruction before teaching with special 
supervision. 



TABLE 127— Distribution of Enrollment in Maryland State Teacherg 
Colleges and Coppin Teachers College by Class, Fall of 1944 



Class 


Towson 


Frost- 




Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppla 








Salis- 








City 


County 


burg 


bury 


County 


State 






Freshman 


32 


45 


28 


46 


119 


151 


41 


36 




25 


37 




36 


73 


98 


24 


27 










16 


16 






Junior 


10 


4 




-) 


4 

15 


14 

15 


22 


83 


Senior 


35 


45 


21 




66 


101 


29 


38 


Cadeta 




*32 


2 


4 


*38 


*39 






Total 


103 


163 


67 


101 


331 


434 


116 


134 


Extension or Evening. . 






16 


19 


35 


35 






Resident Students 


9 


96 


82 


50 


178 


187 


116 




Day Students 


93 


35 


84 


47 


116 


209 




184 


Cadets 




*32 


1 


4 


♦37 


*38 






Elementary School .... 


34 


167 


162 


95 


424 


458 


116 


701 



Includes 29 high school graduates acting as cadets after summer school preparation and work- 
ing under supervision of Towson faculty. 



186 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Enrollment and Faculty at Teachers Colleges 187 



TABLE 129—1944 Entrants at Teachers Colleges 



State 
Teachers 
College 


Total 
Num- 
ber 


Percent Having Had Vari- 
ous High School Courses 


Percent from High. Middle, and 
Lower Third of Class 


Aca- 
demic 


Gen- 
eral 


Com- 
mercial 
Voc. 


High 


Middle 


Low 


Unclassi 
fied 


Towson 

City 

County 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 


31 

43 
28 
46 
42 


90.3 
69.8 
75.0 
69.6 


27 '.9 
17.8 
28.2 


*9.7 
*2.3 
t7.2 
°2.2 


45.2 
67.4 
64.3 
39.1 
66.6 


51.6 
27.9 
28.5 
39.1 
28.5 


3.2 
4.7 

19.6 
4.7 


7^2 
2.2 



♦Commercial tVocational "Unclassified 



TABLE 130— White Freshmen Who Entered Maryland Teachers Colleges 
in September, 1943, Who Withdrew at the Request of the School, 
or Voluntarily, Before September, 1944 





Towson 












Frostburg 


Salisbury 




City 


County 






Freshman Enrollment, September, 1943 


t41 


t54 


19 


59 




5 


2 


1 


8 


Withdrawals at Request of School 


1 


2 






Voluntary Withdrawals 


1 


4 


4 


3 




1 






15 


Percent* Withdrawn at Request of School 


2.8 


3.8 






Percent* of Voluntary Withdrawals 


2.8 


7.7 


22.2 


■5.9 


Percent* Withdrawn to Enter Armed Services 


2.8 






29.4 













* Percent of enrollment exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer or death, 
t Includes entrants in February and June 1944. 



TABLE 131 



Faculty and Staff at Maryland State Teachers Colleges, 1943-44 



StafT 


Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppln 


President 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 




18.5 


9.0 


c9.4 


9.0 


6.0 




3.0 


2.0 


2.0 


1.0 




Campus Elementary School . . 


9.0 


5.3 


3.0 


2.4 


16.0 


Training Centers: 












County 






d7.0 


fl2.0 




City 


al9'.6 










Office Staff 


8.0 


2.0 


2.0 


3.0 


1.0 




b4.0 


.4 


el.O 


g2.0 





a These 19 teachers are in 9 different schools 

b The resident physician and director of student activities also act as instructors, 
c Includes the director of student training who acta as the principal of the elementary school, 
d Includes three teachers in one Somerset County school and four teachers in two Wicomico 
County schools. 

e Includes the social director who also acts as an instructor, 
f Includes five two-teacher and two one-teacher schools. 
K The dietician also acts as instructor in homemaking. 



188 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



At the special legislative session in March 1944 provision was made 
in Chapter 6 of the Lav^s of 1944 to pay to each teacher and employee in 
the State Teachers' Colleges receiving an annual regular salary of less than 
$3,000 on July 1, 1944, in addition to his or her regular salary, $180, to be 
paid in three installments of $60 each on July 1, 1944, October 1, 1944, and 
January 1, 1945; provided, however, that if any employee's regular salary 
plus $180 would amount to more than $3,000, then he shall receive only that 
portion of $180 which when added to his regular salary gives him a total 
annual compensation of $3,000. 

Post-War Construction Plans for the State Teachers Colleges 

Proposed plans for post-war reconstruction and new build- 
ing developments at the State Teachers Colleges were approved 
by the State Board of Education on February 10, 1944 : 

State Teachers College at Frostburg 



A 


(1) 


First unit 


*$125,000 


A 


(2) 


Second unit 


* 125,000 


B 


(3) 


Third unit 


** 60,000 


A 


(4) 


Purchase of property 


25,000 


C 


(5) 


Boys' dormitory building 


75,000 


B 


(6) 


Common room, diningroom, 








and kitchen group 


125,000 


C 


(7) 


Field house 


100,000 


A 


(8) 


Conservation of heat 


30,000 


A 


(9) 


President's residence 


20,000 $685,000 



State Teachers College at Towson 

C (1) Library building $150,000 

C (2) Elementary school addition f 36,000 

A (3) Toilet facilities t 5,500 

C (4) Boys' dormitory 125,000 

A (6) Heat conservation 30,000 

A (8) Repair to terra cotta 15,000 $361,500 

State Teachers College at Salisbury 

B (1) Boys' Dormitory t$25,000 
B (2) President's cottage 15,000 
A (3) Heat conservation 20,000 $60,000 

State Teachers College at Bowie 



A (1) Addition for library room. 


$25,000 


A (2) Farm shop group and garage 


12,000 


C (3) Brick facing of present 


5,000 


gymnasium 


B (4) Housing of employees 


25,000 


A (5) Heat conservation 


25,000 


B (6) Rebuilding of president's 




cottage 


3,000 


A (7) Fire protection 


25,000 


Summary 




Frostburg 


$685,000 


Towson 


361,500 


Salisbury 


60,000 


Bowie 


120,000 


Total 


$1,226,500 



$120,000 



*$100,000 previously recommended in the 6 year plan 
**$60,00<) previously recommended in the 6 year plan 
t Previously recommended in the six year plan 



Salary Adjustment; Post War Building Plans; Total and per 189 
Student Costs 

TABLE 132 



Total and Per Regular Student Costs at State Teachers Colleges, 1930 to 1944 



Year 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Fees 
Paid 
by 
Students 


Cost 

to 
State 


College 
Enrollment 


Percent 
Elemen- 
tary is of 
College 
Enroll- 
ment 


Average Annual Cost per 
College Student 


Total 


Percent 
Resident 


Total 
K 


in 
Fees 


to 
State 
K 


TOWSON 


1930 


$314,699 


$64,660 


$250,039" 


604 


49 




$521 


a$107 


$414 


1932 


277,642 


57,201 


220,441 


582 


43 


46 


477 


a98 


379 


1933 


261,686 


42,182 


219,504 


503 


36 


53 


520 


a84 


436 


1934 


210,135 


79,108 


131,027 


450 


36 


54 


487 


bl96 


291 


1935 


1'92 , 873 


58^Fi7 


1^4,556 


354 


31 


n 


545 


bl65 


380 


1936 


179, 75a 


50,286 


129.465 


330 


25 


75 


545 


bl53 


392 


1937 


184.263 


65,395' 118, 868' 


438 


23 


54 


420 


bl48 


272 


1938 


217,359 


70,312: 147,0471 


455 


26 


54 


478 


bl^5 


323 


1939 


218,6991 81.737. 136,962! 


531 


25 


47 


412 


bl54 


258 


194D 


224,929 


88,414 


136,515! 


535 


31 


46 


420 


bl65 


255 


1941 


219,112 


82,597 


136,515] 


482 


34 


49 


455 


bl7l 


^4 


1942 


222,487 


h74,468 


148,091! 


403 


37 


58 


553 


hbl85 


368 


1943 


tl87,934 


53,264 


134,670; 


*292 


38 


79 


644 


bl83 


461 


1944 


°208,906 


43,145 


°165,76l! 


*234 


39 


103 


892 


1 bl84 


708 



Frostburg 



1930 


$76,581 


$13,22ll 


$63,360 


161 


43 


65 


$476 


a$82 


$394 


1932 


75,575 


9, 8091 


65.766 


113 


50 


166 


669 


a87 


582 


1933 


71,254 


9,175 


62,079 


121 


41 


175 


589 


a76 


513 


1934 


61,359 


21,545! 


39,814 


115 


49 


171 


533 


bl87 


346 


1935 


56,780 


23.230 


33,550 


117 


49 


171 


485 


bl99 


286 


1936 


59,558 


22,415 


37,143 


130 


42 


161 


459 


bl73 


286 


1937 


64,087 


23,444 


40,643' 


131 


45 


153 


489 


bl79 


310 


1938 


77,755 


29,625: 


48,130! 


167 


44 


123 


466 


bl78 


288 


1939 


82,025 


33,895| 


48,130 


204 


39 


93 


402 


bl66 


236 


1940 


80,919, 


37,869! 


43.050! 


214 


46 


86 


378 


1 bl77 


201 


1941 


82,220 


36,535 


45,685 


210 


41 


85 


392 


bl74 


218 


1942 


83,889 


h33.398 


50,491 


186 


41 


95 


451 


hbl79 


272 


1943 


t69,071 


20,757, 


48,314 


*116 


41 


167 


595 


1 bl79 


416 


1944 


°85,257« 


13.5361 


°71, 72111 


*75 


40 


216 


1,136 


U bl80 


956 



Salisbury 



1930 


$98,930 


$27,456; $71,474' 


168 


88 


53 


$589 


a$l63 


$426 


1932 


88,197 


20,475i 67,722 


124 


85 


79 


711 


al65 


546 


1933 


71,346 


12,575 58,771 


98 


72 


108 


728 


al28 


600 


1934 


66,144 


24,2671 41,877 


114 


71 


102 


580 


b213 


367 


1935 


59,435 


20,706 38,729 


109 


40 


121 


545 


b252 


293 


1936 


67,672 


32,289 35,383 


184 


41 


69 


384 


bl92 


192 


1937 


70,185 


34,8011 35,384 


200 


40 


61 


351 


bl74 


177 


1938 


87,595 


36,608 50,987 


210 


39 


58 


417 


bl74 


243 


1939 


89,119 


41,787| 47,332 


228 


49 


52 


391 


bl83 


208 


1940 


93,633 


48,746! 44,887 


268 


51 


49 


350 


bl82 


168 


1941 


84,281 


40,444f 43,837 


211 


55 


57 


400 


bl92 


208 


1942 


92,625 


h37,588 55,037 


194 


47 


59 


478 


hbl94 


284 


1943 


t68,922 


23.185 45,737 


*143 


36 


69 


482 


bl62 


320 


1944 


°87,428 


22,572; °64,856a 


*114 


50 


67 


767 


bl98 


669 



Bowie 



1930 


$57,004 


$14,799 


$42,205 


108 


97 


61 


$528 


d$137 


$391 


1932 


47,790 


13,600 


34,190 


97 


97 


71 


492 


dl40 


362 


1933 


55.064 


15,449 


39.615 


108 


98 


60 


510 


dl43 


367 


1934 


39,082 


13,385 


25.697 


89 


97 


65 


439 


el50 


289 


1935 


46,817 


14,723 


32,094 


87 


98 


68 


638 


el69 


369 


1936 


42,965 


13,571 


29,394 


86 


97 


79 


500 


el58 


342 


1937 


47,601 


17,673 


29,928 


111 


92 


59 


429 


el59 


270 


1938 


59,589 


19,275 


40.314 


128 


92 


75 


466 


el51 


315 


1939 


62,911 


19,069 


43,841 


158 


97 


66 


399 


fl21 


278 


1940 


57.695 


17.098 


40,597 


121 


98 


93 


477 


gl41 


336 


1941 


60.295 


19.270 


41,025 


140 


99 


86 


431 


gl38 


293 


1942 


63.134 


19.359 


43.775 


144 


98 


86 


439 


gl35 


304 


1943 


t56.693 


15,959 


40.733 


104 


99 


106 


545 


gl53 


392 


1944 


°72.307 


14,939 


°57,368 


103 


100 


108 


702 


gl46 


657 



a Day students paid $20, women residents $200, and men boarders $72. 
b Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 
d Resident students paid $120, day students $9. Service rendered by students, 
e Resident students paid $164, day students $19. 

f Resident students paid $110, day students $15. Service rendered by students. 
g Resident students paid $140, day students $20. 

n Includes excess of receipts over expenditures of summer school students transferred to offset 
deficit in actual under estimated student fees. 

* Each cadet teacher is included as one-half a student. 

t Expenditures for ten month period from Sept. 1, 1942, to June 30, 1943. 

k Entire cost of educating elementary pupils is charged against college students. 

° Includes bonus payments by state. 



190 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 133 — Expenditures and Receipts at State Teachers 
Colleges from July 1, 1943 to June 30, 1944 







Expenditures 


for Instruction 




Expenditures for Dormitory 






a 








c 
_o 


a 


a 

or.2 






1 


o 






i 










College 


O, 
X 


trat 


CO 

u 

•S2 




c 


t-i 

o 


trat 


C C o 






Total E 


Adminis 


Salaries ( 
Instruc 


other th 
Salaries 


Operatic 
Mainte 


Transpi 


Adminis 


Operatic 
Mainte 
Transpi 
Health 


Food 




a 

$208,906 


$22,286 


$95,531 


$6,184 


$35, 


810 


$5,048 


$30,999 


$13,048 


Frostburg 


b85,257 


12,362 


42,684 


3,053 


10, 


004 


1,558 


12,671 


2,925 


Salisbury 


cd87,428 


8,515 


39,678 


7,064 


7, 


059 


5,694 


14,850 


4,568 


Total White 


$381,591 


$43,163 


$177,893 


$16,301 


$ 52, 


873 


$12,300 


$58,520 


$20,541 


Bowie 


d72,307 


3,487 


26,876 


4,734 


9, 


504 


2.328 


14.368 


11,010 



Receipts For Operations Sept. 1943 To June 1944 



College 


Average 
Enrollment in 


Receipts for 
Instruction from 


Average 
Resident 
Enroll- 
ment 


Receipts for 
Dormitory from 


College 


Ele- 
mentary 
School 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Towson 

Salisbury 


e234 
ef75 
efll4 


240 
162 
76 


$23 , 473 
7,692 
11,441 


$136,338 
60,411 
50,875 


92 
30 
57 


$19,672 
5,844 
11,131 


$29 , 423 
11,310 
13,981 


Total White. . 
Bowie 


ef423 
103 


478 
111 


$42,606 
1,652 


$247,624 
42,949 


179 
103 


$36,647 
13,287 


$54,714 
14,419 



1943 Summer Session 



College 


Enrollment 


Receipts 


Expendi- 
tures 


Balance 
Carried 
Forward 


Total 


Resident 


Tuition 


Dormitory 




234 


92 


$8,267 


$7,835 


$12,951 


$3,151 


Frostburg 


154 


47 


5,390 


3,795 


7,433 


1,752 


Salisbiu-y 


142 


59 


4,855 


4,574 


7,071 


d527 



a Excludes $6,359.63, receipts to budget items and $3,597.97 faculty board and cottage rent, 
as well as $1,140 added to 1943 summer school expenditures for items not charged to summer school 
such as fuel, light, heat and power, etc. Bonus payments of $9,401.12 have been included. 

b Excludes $132.20, receipts to budget items and $1,712.94 for food and miscellaneous items. 
Bonus payments of $4,354.92 have been included. 

c Excludes $1,645, receipts to budget items and $1,826 for land and structures paid for from 
excess summer school fees. Includes $4,172.92 for State bonus. 

d Excludes $999, receipts to budget items, and $6,000 for capital outlay, but includes $200 for 
State bonus. 

e Cadets are included for the part of the year tuition was paid, i.e. .5 if tuition was $50, .25 
if it was $25. 

f Each evening and extension course student enrolled the entire year was counted .3. 



Expenditures, Receipts and Cost per Student 191 
CHART 33 



state 

Teachers 
College 
at 

Frostburg 

Towson 

Salisbuiy 

Bowie 



1943-44 COST PER TEACHERS COLLEGE STUDENT - REGULAR SESSION 
TOTAL COST OF INSTRUCTION PER STUDENT 

Paid by 



Average 
Number of 
College Elem. 
Students Pupilst 



f 75 
"234 
t»114 



H^HTotai COE 



Total 
Cost 



State 



Student 



103 




TOTAL COST PER RESIDENT STUDENT* 



State 
Teachers 
College 



Resident 
Students 
Average *Per 



Total Cost 



Pai d by 
State ^MlStudent 



Total 



at 


Number 


Cent 


Cost 


Frostburg 


30 


40 


$1480 


Towson 


92 


39 


1217 


Salisbury 


57 


50 


987 


Bowie 


103 


100 


702 



^1,183 
^903 
691 




° Each cadet teacher is counted as one-half a student. 

t Each extension oi evening school sUident is counted as .?> of a Student. 

t Not considered in calculating cost per college student. Elementary pupils were fol- 
lowing percent of college enrollment in 1944: Towson. 103; Frostburg, 21G ; Salisbury, CT : 
Bowie 108. 

* Percent that resident students were of total college enrollment, 
t Including instruction and dormitory cost. 



CHART 34 



AVERAGE PAYMENT PER TEACHERS COLLEGE STUDENT - SUMMER SESSION - 1943 



State Total Resident 

Teachers Summer Summer Payment —^ttt^ Payment per 

College Enroll- Enroll- per Resident 
at ment nent Resident 



Frostburg 154 47 
Towson 234 92 
Salisbury 142 59 



Payment for 

m HIT" 




192 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 134 

Contributions by Teachers to the Annuity Savings Fund of the Teachers* 
Retirement System of the State of Maryland for the Year Ended July 31, 
1944, Number and Percent of October, 1944, County Teaching Staff Who 
Are Members in Active Service 









Members in 






Amount Contri- 


Active 


Service 






buted Year 


October. 1944 




County or Institution 


Ending July 31, 










1944 
















dumber 


Percent 


County i 












Allegany 


*qi Hcr 


oU 


416 


85 




Anne Arundel 


25,235 


68 




71 


6 




4.Q 1 7^ 


y o 


518 


75 


3 


Calvert 


Q fiQC 
O , OOD 


QQ 
OO 


52 


72 


'.2 




6 286 


Ui 


sa 

oo 


83 


.8 


Carroll 




10 


190 


84 




Cecil 


9,136 


74 


1 QQ 

loo 


83 


is 


Charles 


6,511 


54 


77 


62 






O , OD^ 




111 


74 







19 127 


01 


OA r; 


87 


g 


Garrett 


a AQQ 

o , 4oy 


7Q 


117 


76 


.2 




15 243 


00 




83 


.8 








88 


75 


.9 


Kent 


5,237 


01 


1 D 


92 


.7 




40,664 


14 


°443 


75 






31,088 


78 


§432 


68 


g 


5.946 


98 


75 


87 


2 




3,870 


07 


50 


56 


2 


Somerset 


6 772 


45 


92 


83 


6 




6!096 


53 


81 


77 


9 


Washington 


29,590 


23 


362 


89 


4 




11,214 


35 


154 


85 


6 


Worcester 


7,403 


13 


104 


88 


1 




$346,672 


36 


4,407 


78 


5 


Teachers Colleges: 












Towson 


6,034 


96 


44 


97 


8 




2,320 


54 


17 


80 


9 


Salisbury 


2,184 


93 


17 


85 







1,516 


32 


15 


88 


2 


Department: 














5,508 


84 


*36 


97 


3 


Library 


573 


00 


5 


100 







211 


26 


t2 


100 







496 


52 


5 


100 





Other Schools: 












Maryland Training School for Boys 


1,845 


73 


18 








1,125 


24 


7 






Maryland Training School for Colored Girls 


780 


98 


7 






Rosewood State Training School 


1,500 


70 


10 








2,048 


52 


24 






Total Schools and Departments 


26,147 


54 


207 






Grand Total 


$372,819 


90 


4,614 







* Excludes four staff members who belong to the State Employees Retirement System and one 
who belongs to the Baltimore City Employees Retirement System. 

t Excludes one who belongs to the State Employees Retirement System. 

° Excludes 20 whose certification was received too late for inclusion in the October count. 

§ Excludes 50 whose certification was received too late for inclusion in the October count. 



Contributions and Membership; Teachers Retirement System; 193 
Inventories; School Dental Clinics 



TABLE 135— Inventories at State Teachers Colleges and State 
Department of Education as of June 30, 1944 



School or Department 


Land and 
Improve- 
ments 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


Towson State Teachers College 

Frostburg State Teachers College 

Salisbury State Teachers College 

Bowie State Teachers College 

* State Department of Education 


$127,970 
80,591 
19,723 
30,396 


$1,302,348 
354,718 
700,046 
454,285 


$215,903 
48,960 
101,679 
71,483 
20,565 
6,239 
1,549 


$1,646,221 
484,269 
821,448 
556,164 
20,565 
6,239 
1,549 


Total 


$258,680 


$2,811,397 


$466,378 


$3,536,455 



* Includes Vocational Education, Physical Education and Bureau of Educational Measurements. 



TABLE 136— School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of 
Maryland State Department of Health, August 1, 1943 to July 31, 1944 





"o 


s 


Time 


Number of 

Children 




Number of 










.5 


Given 

















County 






to 


Ex- 
















s 


■§ 


Serv- 


amined 




Fillings 


Teeth 


Clean- 


Treat- 


Total 






O 


ce* 


by 


Treated 


Inserted 


Ex- 


ings 


ments 


Opera- 








Dentist 






tracted 




tions 






8 




15,151 


2,917 


4,795 


5,632 


622 


3,100 


14,149 








Full 


4,737 


1,371 


541 


3,796 


402 


1.441 


6,180 


Anne Arundel 






Part 


378 


224 


132 


369 


11 





512 


Baltimore 






Part 


346 


76 


380 


74 


64 


275 


793 


Calvert 






Part 


100 


74 


190 


97 







287 


Carroll 






Half 


86 


79 


474 


372 





36 


882 


Harford 






Part 


55 


55 


93 


69 


5? 





214 


Montgomery 






Full 


8,<^41 


816 


2,159 


698 


1 


1.26S 


4,126 


Prince George's. . . 






Part 




222 


826 


157 


92 


80 


1,155 



• The scope of service varies from full-time and half-time service to part-time, meaning one or 
more one-day clinics per month. 



194 



1944 Report of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Services to School Children by State and County Health 195 

Offices 



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196 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 139 

Services of Maryland Public Library Commission to Maryland County 
Schools for White Pupils by Year 



Year 
Ending June 30 



Total Number 
Supplied 



Volumes 



Pictures 



Traveling Libraries 
(30-35 Books in Each) 



No. 



Supplied to 



Schools Teachers 



Package Libraries 
(1-12 Books in Each) 



No. 



Supplied to 



Schools Teachers 



White Elementary Schools 



12,022 
9,799 

16,606 
8,609 
8,675 
7,029 
8,255 
5,577 
4,258 
4,249 
3,751 
2,894 
1,934 
3,299 



569 
1,814 
574 
288 
14 



299 


157 


196 


393 


89 


124 


275 


165 


206 


266 


79 


84 


419 


182 


275 


334 


87 


112 


225 


96 


128 


210 


91 


107 


219 


81 


144 


247 


■ 77 


88 


184 


66 


80 


150 


46 


56 


207 


44 


52 


237 


56 


73 


133 


39 


43 


199 


47 


52 


92 


26 


31 


279 


66 


82 


86 


22 


25 


375 


64 


75 


69 


17 


21 


353 


56 


75 


62 


10 


12 


207 


44 


56 


46 


10 


11 


112 


37 


40 


91 


10 


16 


31 


17 


21 



White High Schools 



1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 
1935. 
1936. 
1937. 
1938. 
1939. 
1940. 
1941. 
1942. 
1943. 
1944. 



3,236 
4,562 
6,266 
4,148 
6,172 
3 , 723 
3,082 
3,937 
3,208 
5,076 
5,432 
3,791 
2,508 
2,273 



323 
125 
180 
27 
105 



77 


31 


47 


125 


27 


32 


105 


31 


48 


189 


49 


54 


148 


35 


45 


331 


47 


57 


91 


35 


39 


324 


37 


63 


148 


42 


79 


338 


48 


67 


95 


31 


46 


134 


24 


29 


61 


18 


21 


281 


37 


48 


54 


16 


17 


405 


35 


37 


51 


11 


11 


284 


26 


28 


37 


13 


13 


809 


37 


46 


35 


13 


13 


828 


43 


48 


32 


12 


12 


679 


35 


35 


25 


11 


11 


326 


29 


30 


30 


8 


9 


280 


34 


34 



Taking advantage of better discounts and assistance in selecting, eight 
white elementary and nine white high schools purchased library books 
through the Library Commission. As an aid to book selection the Commission 
now maintains an exhibit of graded books for school libraries, so that 
teachers may have an opportunity to examine current books before pur- 
chasing. 

Reading certificates were issued to pupils reading eight or more books 
approved by the Library Commission. The purpose of this activity is to 
encourage the reading of better books by young people. The awarding of 
certificates is optional with the teacher. In 1943-44 reading certificates 
were issued to 129 elementary school children. The number of books read 
for certification by elementary school pupils totalled 2048. 

A bookmobile covers Talbot County in four different routes: 1 — Clai- 
borne, Tilghman, Sherwood, Wittman, Neavitt, and Bozman; 2 — Trappe, 
Trappe Station, and Oxford; 3 — Unionville, Tunis Mills, Royal Oak, and St. 
Michaels; 4 — Longwoods, Newton, Wye Mills, Jarreiltown, Cordova, and 
Matthewstown. On these routes 26 schools are visited and 17 deposit 
stations for adults. The branch in the Cordova School is a very active one, 
serving both school and community. 



Services of Maryland Public Library Commission to White 197 

Schools 



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r h hr" hr" M '5 o* .9 c" 



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198 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 141 



Services of Maryland Public Library Advisory Commission to the County 
Colored Schools, 1943-44 



County 



Traveling Libraries 
(30 to 35 Books in Each) 



Num- 


Supplied to 






ber 




Teach- 




Schools 


ers 



Package Libraries 
(1 to 12 Books in Each) 



Num- 
ber 



Supplied to 



I T each- 
Schools I ers 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Total 


82 


2 


1 


1 


12 


4 


4 


Calvert 


8 








4 


1 


1 




7 








3 


1 


1 




64 


2 


i 




3 


1 


1 


Prince George's 


3 








2 


1 


1 



Colored High Schools 



Total 


89 


2 


1 


1 


12 


4 


4 


Anne Arundel 


5 








1 


1 


1 


Baltimore 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Calvert 


14 








6 


1 


1 


Howard 


60 


2 


i 


i 








Wicomico 


9 








'4 


i 


i 



In addition to school libraries books are available to colored children and adults through the 
following public libraries or branches: 



Allegany — Cumberland Public Library 

Anne Arundel — -Clay Street School, Annapolis 

County library lends to colored schools 
Baltimore 

Catonsville Colored School (Branch) 

Sparrows Point Public Library 

Towson Public Library 

Turner School — -Branch of Dundalk 
Dorchester — Cambridge Public Library 
Frederick — C. Burr Artz Library in Frederick 

lends books to colored schools 



Howard — County library lends on request 
Montgomery — River Road School (branch of 
Bethesda) 

Silver Spring lends to schools 
Rockville lends to schools 
Talbot — County library has branches in colored 
schools 

Washington — County Library lends collections 
of books on request 



Parole, Freetown and Cedar Hill Schools in Anne Arundel County received from the Rosenwald 
BXind one third of the cost of the books plus transportation charges toward elementary school libraries 
valued at $30 at Parole and $36 at the other two schools. The schools paid the remainder of the costs. 

Taking advantage of better discounts and assistance in selecting, one colored elementary and one 
colored high school purchased library books through the Library Commission. 



Library Service to Colored Schools 
List of Finanical and Statistical Tables 



199 



LIST OF STATISTICAL AND FINANCIAL TABLES 1943-44 
Subject of Tables 

Table No. Page 

Financial Statements 200-202 

I Number of Schools 203 

II Total Public School Enrollmemt 204-205 

III Catholic Private Schools: Enrollment and Teaching 

Staff 206-207 

IV Non-Catholic Private Schools: Enrollment and 

Teaching Staff 208-209 

V Non-Public Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 210 

VI Average Number of Public School Pupils Belonging 211 

VII Average Daily Attendance 212 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance 213 

IX Average Days in Session; Percent of Attendance 214 

X Number of Teaching Positions, Public Schools 215-216 

XI Receipts from State and Federal Government 217 

XII Receipts from All Sources 218 

XIII Total Disbursements 219 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 220 

XV Disbursements for Instruction and Operation 221 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance, Auxiliary Agencies, and 

Fixed Charges 222 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service and Capital Outlay 223 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Schools 224 

XIX Disbursements for the Last Four Years of White 

High Schools 225 

XX Disbursements for Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 

High Schools 226-227 

XXI Disbursements for Colored Elementary Schools 228 

XXII Disbursements for Colored High Schools 229 

XXIII Cost, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates, Courses in 

Individual County High Schools 230-235 

XXIV Enrollment by Subject in Individual County High 

Schools 236-241 



200 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



I 



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Financial Statements for Public Schools and Teachers 201 
Colleges 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1944 



Soiu-ce or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teachers 
College 


Frostburg 
State Teachers 
College 


Salisbury 
State Teachers 
College 


Bowie 
State Teachers 
College 


Receipts 


Students' Fees, Regular Session 

Students' Fees, Summer Session 


a$61,085.00 


b$166,975.00 
47,457.97 
16,102.37 


C$67,366.00 
15,362.75 
9,199.95 


d$68.385.00 
23,433.77 
9,471.20 


e$57, 169.00 
14,990.66 




4,750.00 


6,000.00 
999.17 




6,359.63 


132.20 


1,666.11 


a$65,835.00 


b$236,894.97 


C$92,060.90 


d$102,956.08 


e$79, 158.83 



Disbursements 



Salaries, Wages, and Special Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power and Water 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing other than Office Supplies . . . . 

All Other Contractual Services 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning and Disinfecting. . . 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and Recrea- 
tional Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Motor Vehicle Equipment Material . . . . 

Materials for Equipment 

Highway Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equipment. . . 

Live Stock 

Agricultural and Botanical Equipment. 

Educational, Vocational, and Recrea- 
tional Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Land 

Non-Structural Improvements 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Summer Session 



Total Disbursements . 



Refunds of Students' Fees 

Unexpended Balance Returned to 

State Treasury 

Summer School Balance Forwarded to 

1945 



Grand Total. 



a$54,613.96 
49.85 
479.74 

" 3,119.09 
30.14 
3,143.77 

86!46 



1,082.38 



655.32 
i!i22;92 



28.50 



31.70 



95.79 



241.75 
205.78 



i$65,587.09 



247.91 



i$65,835.00 



b$152,322.87 
4,353.00 
349.93 
5,904.84 
92.52 
47.06 
1,937.86 
651.08 
395.70 
20,773.60 
296.88 
10,335.33 
354.35 
96.56 
1,200.00 
145.34 

1,920.75 
188.68 
392.16 
97.43 
178.22 
1,431.48 
51.16 
1,000.34 

547! 48 
10.44 

4i!2i 

282.82 
49.71 



3,940.20 
47.25 
99.52 



946.66 
120.00 
11,811.35 



b$222,413.78 
715.00 
10,615.54 
3,150.65 



b$236,894.97 



C$66,464.07 
690.45 
19.85 
1,273.94 
206.94 
14.55 
425.67 
371.43 
716.81 
4,563.22 

' '2;43i!66 
100.56 
80.68 
15.61 



1,220.12 
46.13 
84.46 
18.05 

' '736;47 
49.36 
193.46 



11.23 



969.70 
27.72 



1,571.43 
24.98 



200.00 
"224! 35 



7,432.58 



C$90,179.42 
129.00 
.11 
1.752.37 



C$92,060.90 



d$60,395.13 
597.16 
99.32 
2,395.50 
400.51 
5.89 
884.30 
549.25 
488.58 
6,074.73 

' '21237.27 
367.29 
378.59 
384.80 
24.30 

1,718.78 

■ '436;64 
21.74 

322.52 
59.70 
427.32 



5.71 
700.00 
2.63 
17. «5 



249.81 



4,802.76 
10.90 
12.40 

1,795.91 
51.00 

' '288!23 

7!67i".i2 



d$93,817.64 
903.50 
7,708.06 
526.88 



d$102,956.08 



711 


82 


224 


89 


918 


42 





State bonus payments of the following amounts are excluded: a $1000; b $9,401.12; c $4,354.92; d $4,172.92; e $200.00. 



202 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Source or Purpose 


Vocational 
Education 


Physical 
Education and 
Recreation 


Bureau of 
Educational 
Measurements 


Supervision 
of Colored 
Schools 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


Receipts 


State'Appropriation 

Federal Appropriations and 
General Education Board . 

Transfers by Budget Amend- 
ment and Refunds 


e$12, 085.00 
al2,517.88 
350.00 
$24,952.88 


f $18, 620. 00 


g$12,000.00 


$4,000.00 
bl,200.00 


h$25,734.00 
a39,191.98 
65.00 
$64,990.98, 


Total Receipts 


$18,620.00 


$12,000.00 


$5,200.00 



Disbursements 



Salaries, Wages and Special 
Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Other Contractual Services- 
Tuition for trainees 

Office Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

O.Tice Equipment 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment . . . 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 



Total Disbursements . . . 

Returned to State 
Treasury 

Transferred by Budget 
Amendment 



Grand Total. 



e$20,091.93 
3 



183.98 
155.46 



251.80 
'82;84 



459.08 
472.63 



16.40 

11.65 
150.00 
31.80 



$24,907.57 



45.31 



$24,952.1 



f$8, 565.30 
29.78 
34.25 
1,055.15 
1.21 
575.44 



449 . 52 

199.35 
2.57.15 
1,161.55 
92.65 



76.04 



17. 
10.00 

$12,525.07 

994.93 
5,100.00 
$18,620.00 



g$8,719.81 



13.75 



24.10 
3,206.00 



32.00 
1.25 



$11,996.91 



3.09 



$12,000.00 



$4,000.00 
' '8i3!32 



$4,813.32 
d386.68 



$5,200.00 



h$24,665.42 



68.85 
c5,041.48 



970.47 



cl4,034.91 
521.92 



C810.54 
181.82 



172.94 
c6,021.64 
'26!62 

$52,510.61 

$12,480.37 



$64,990.98 



a-Federal funds b-Appropriated by General Education Board. c-In eludes expenditures for 
trainees. d-Unused travel allowance refunded to General Education Board. Excludes following 
bonus payments from State: e $400; f $200; g $600; h $364.80. 



Construction Accounts State Teachers Colleges 1943-44 



Purpose 


Frostburg 
State Teachers 
College 


Salisbury 
State Teachers 
College 


Bowie 
State Teachers 
College 


Receipts 


Bonds authorized in 1939 


$100,000.00 






Total Receipts 


7,000.00 


30,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$7,000.00 


$30,000.00 



Disbursements 



Architect's fees. 

Construction 

Well 

Equipment 

General Repairs . 
Miscellaneous . . . 



Total Disbursements . 
Balance to 1945 



Grand Total. 



;,264.15 



$2,264.15 
97,735.85 

$100,000.00 



$332.49 



5,541.50 



$5,873.99 
1,126.01 

$7,000.00 



$1,135.15 
15,394.75 
4,392.00 
4,860.14 

6^66 

$25,788.64 
4,211.36 

$30,000.00 



Financial Statements; Number of Schools 



203 



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204 



1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Enrollment in Public Schools 



205 



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206 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE III 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools 
in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County and School 



Enrollment 



County and School 



Enrollment 



Allegany 
*S. S. Peter's and Paul's, 

Cumberland 

*St. Patrick's, Catholic Girls' 

Central High, Cumberland 

*St. Mary's, Cumberland 

St. Michael's, Frostburg 

♦La Salle Institute, Cumberland . 

*St. Peter's, Westernport 

St. Patrick's, Mt. Savage 

St. Joseph's, Midland 



Total (8) . 



Anne Arundel 

St. Mary 's, Annapolis 

St. Mary's (Colored), Annapolis 

Baltimore 
♦School of the Immaculate and 

Catholic High, Towson 

♦Loyola High School, Towson ... 

Oxir Lady of Mt. Carmel, 

Middle River 

St. Rita's, Dundalk 

St. Ursula's, Parkville 

St. Mark's, Catonsville 

St. Michael's, Overlea 

St. Clement's, Rosedale 

St. Joseph's, Fullerton 

St. Charles, Pikesville 

♦St. Stephen's, Bradshaw 

Ascension, Halethorpe 

♦St. Charles College, Catonsville. 

St. Agnes, Woodlawn 

St. Clement's, Lansdowne 

Mt. de Sales, Catonsville 

St. Joseph's, Texas 

St. Vincent's Orphanage, 

Towson . 



Total (18), 



481 

307 
339 

288 

133 
159 
101 



1,808 



346 



384 



509 
386 
369 
363 
316 
286 
241 
232 
173 
225 

172 
159 
9 
86 




115 



174 
62 



25 



485 



209 
531 



12 



58 
223 

88 



19 



Calvert 
Our Lady, Star of the Sea, 
Solomon's 



76 



Caroline 
St. Gertrude's Academy, 
Ridgely 



Carroll 

♦St. John's, Westminster. 
St. Joseph's, Taneytown. 



Total (2) , 



Cecil 

Immaculate Conception, Elkton . 
Charles 

♦Sacred Heart, La Plata 

♦St. Mary's, Notre Dame High, 
Bryantown 



Total (2) 

St. Mary's (Colored), Bryantown 
Frederick 

♦St. John's, Frederick 

St. Euphemia's, Emmitsburg . . . 

St. Anthony's, Emmitsburg 

♦St. Joseph's College High, Em- 
mitsburg 

Visitation, Frederick 

St. Peter's, Liberty town 



Total (6) 

St. Euphemia's (Colored), Em- 
mitsburg 



Garrett 
St. Peter's, Oakland. 



Harford 
St. Margaret's, Bel Air. 



63 



34 



143 
40 



183 

122 

199 
12S 
327 
137 



179 
175 
125 



535 
5 

66 

105 



20 



27 



27 



90 



44 



104 
42 



42 



190 



♦Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



Enrollment and Teaching Staff in Catholic Schools 207 



TABLE III— (Continued) 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools 
in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County and School 



Enrollment 



0) 

S 
S 
o 



County and School 



Enrollment 



Howard 

St. Paul's, EUicott City 

♦Trinity, llchester 

St. Augustine's, Elkridge 

*St. Louis', Clarksville 

Total (4) 

St. Augustine's (Col.), EUicott 
City 

Montgomery 
St. Michael's, Silver Spring. . . . 
Our Lady of Lourdes ,Bethesda 
Academy of the Holy Name, 

Silver Spring 

♦Georgetown Preparatory, 

Garrett Park 

St. Martin's, Gaithersburg . . . . 

Total (5) 

Prince George's 

St. James, Mt. Rainier 

Holy Redeemer, Berwyn 

*St. Mildred's Upper Marlboro. 

St. Jerome's, Hyattsville 

St. Mary's, Upper Marlboro.. . 
*La Salle Hall, Ammendale 

Total (5) 

St. Mary's (Col.), Upper Marlboro 

St. Mary's 

*St. Mary's Academy, Leonard 

town 

♦St. Michael's, Ridge 

St. Joseph's, M organza 

St. John's, Hollywood 

Little Flower, Great Mills. . . . 

Holy Angels, Abell 

Leonard Hall, Leonardtown . . , 

Sacred Heart, Bushwood 

Our Lady, Medley's Neck.. . . 

Total (9) 



123 
56 
96 
82 



357 
53 



564 
402 



49 
135 



150 



427 
245 
163 
11 
90 



,043 
66 



166 
151 
231 
173 
171 
164 
110 
105 
102 



1,373 



79 



79 



37 



37 



74 



201 
150 



351 



139 
70 



1 09 48 



St. Peter Claver's (Col.), 

Ridge 

St. Joseph's (Col.),Morganza 

Total (Col.) (2) 



169 
102 



Washington 

♦St. Mary's, Hagerstown. 



271 



308 



All Maryland Counties 
White Catholic Schools (67) 
Colored Catholic Schools (7) 

Baltimore City 

♦Seton 

♦Mt. St. Joseph's 

♦Institute of Notre Dame. . . 

♦Catholic High 

♦Calvert Hall 

♦Notre Dame of Maryland . . 
♦Mt. St. Agnes 

Mt. Washington Country . . . 

Calvert Hall Country 

Visitation 



Total (10) 



♦St. Martin's 

50 Other White Parish 

Schools 

4 Institutions for White 
Children 



Total White (65) 26,010 



11,797 
601 



37 
284 



180 
75 

190 
56 
48 



208 



870 
893 
23,914 
333 



478 



♦St. Francis' Academy (Col.). 

3 Colored Parish Schools. . . , 

4 Institutions for Colored 
Children 



Total Colored (8) 



Entire State 
White (132). 
Colored (15) . 



73 
1,108 



153 
,334 



37,807 
1,935 



478 



26 



26 



75 



2,716 
26 



1,151 
1,005 
528 
775 
563 
267 
195 



4,484 
111 



14 



686 



4,609 
185 

20 



205 



7,325 
231 



1,412 
103 



♦Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



208 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE IV 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Public Other Than Catholic Elementary 
and Secondary Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June, 1944 



County and School 



Enroll- 
ment 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



No. OF 
Teachers 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary 



Full- 
time 



Part- 
time 



County and School 



Enroll- 
ment 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary 



No. OF 
Teachers 



Full- 
time 



Allegany 
tWaddell, Cumberland 



Anne Arundel 
♦Severn School, Severna Park 
HoUaday School, Annapolis. 
lAnnapolis Nursery and Kin- 
dergarten 

Thomas School, Annapolis. . . . 



Total (4) 



Baltimore 

♦McDonogh (Boys) 

Garrison Forest (Girls), 

Garrison 

Hannah More Academy 

(Girls), Reisterstown 

tCrosby, 20 Beaumont Ave., 

Catonsville 

St. Timothy's (Girls), 

Catonsville 

Oldficlds (Girls), Glencoe ... 
Greenwood (Girls), Ruxton 4 

°Blue Bird, Ruxton 

JHappy Day Nursery School, 

Anneslie 

tLutherville Kindergarten . . . 
fPlayground, 6414 Pinehurst 

Road, Baltimore- 12 

"Matthews School, La Paix 
Lane, Rodger 's Forge .... 



Total (12) 



Cecil 

♦Jacob Tome Institute, Port 

Deposit 

♦West Nottingham Academy, 

(Boys), Color a 

Seventh Day Adventiet, 
Perry ville 



Total (3) 



Kent 

Rigs O'Marlow, Chestertown 
Route 3 



Montgomery 

Columbia Junior College, 

Takoma Park 

Landon (Boys). Bethesda 14 
"Whitehall Country, Bethesda 
"Countryside, Silver Spring . . . 



:24 

55 

t53 
16 

124 

378 
64 
15 

t91 



18 

°58 

t33 
t26 

t26 

°14 



*120 



718 

221 
19 
20 



260 



198 
174 
=169 
'116 



120 

266 
108 
81 



655 

♦81 
♦47 

8 



131 



207 
74 



139 



23 



10 



21 



Montgomery (Cont'd) 

Longfellow (Boys), Bethesda. 
°Chevy Chase Country, 

17 Grafton St 

♦BuUis (Boys), Silver Spring.. 
=Lady Isabel, 4801 Edgemoor 

Lane, Edgemoor 

"^Green Acres, Bethesda 

Slade (Boys). Olney 

Chevy Chase Junior College, 
(Girls) 

Total (11) 

Prince George's 

Briarley Military Academy 

(Boys), Ammendale 

Avondale Country, (Boys), 

Laurel 

§Mrs. Ballinger's Nursery, 

Riverdale 

Hillside Seventh Day Ad- 
ventist, Laurel 

Total (4) 

Queen Anne's 

JGunston, Centreville 

Seventh Day Adventist 
(Boys), Grasonville 

Total (2) 

St. Mary's 

♦Charlotte Hall (Boys) 

♦St. Mary's Female Seminary 
St. Mary's City 

Total (2) 

Talbot 
"Country, Easton 

Washington 

St. James (Boys), Hagers- 

town 

JMiss Hoffmeier's, Hagers- 

town 

Hagerstown Church School. 

Total (3) 

Wicomico 
JMrs. Herold's, Salisbury 

Total County White (45) — 

5 Nursery Bchool only. 
X Includes kindergarten. 



114 

'103 



1008 

64 
41 
§14 
4 



123 

3 



20 



19 



13 
X53 



73 
X23 
2.445 



♦100 

3 
28 



412 



12 



12 

♦128 
♦53 



181 



74 



74 



1,593 



• Secondary school accredited by Maryland State 
Board of Education. 

t Kindergarten only. 

^ Includes nurgery school and klndersarten. 



Enrollment and Teaching Staff in Non Public Non 209 
Catholic Schools 



TABLE IV— (Continued) 



Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Public Other Than Catholic Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Schools in Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1944 



School 


Enrollment 


Number of 
Teachers 


Elemen- 
tary 




Secondary 


Full- 
time 


Part- 
time 


Schools for White Pupils 










Frierds 5114 N. Charles St. 


1314 


141 


34 


10 


Bryn Mawi (G'rls), West Melrose Ave 


il66 


122 


26 


2 


Calvert School Tuscanv Koad. 


t318 




27 




Park School, 3025 Liberty Heights Ave 


J215 


9i 


32 


3 


Roland Park Country (Girls), 817 W. University 










Parkway , . . . . 


n9o 


89 


18 


10 


Oilman (Boys), Roland and Belvedere Aves 


t1 t^Q 






o 


Talmudical Academy (Boys), 3701 Cottage Ave 


t233 


14 


10 


13 


St. Paul's School (Boys), 2101 W. Rogers Ave.. . 


103 


90 


11 


3 




t74 


78 


12 


4 




112 




3 






tioi 




11 


'2 


Girls' Latin, 10 Club Road 


13 


69 


7 


4 


Salvation Army Day Nursery, 242 S. Patterson 












xx69 




7 


4 


Hamilton Nursery, 3005-7 Hamilton Ave 


§66 




1 


2 


Nursery and Child Study Home, 721 Woodboame Ave.. . 


60 




3 




♦Samuel Ready (Girls), 5100 Old Frederick Road 

Miss Crater's Countrv, 3524 Meadowside Road 


28 


*31 


4 


4 


t56 




4 




Kornerstone Kindergarten, Lafayette and Bolton Sts 


XX 52 




1 


3 


Whitmore Nursery, Liberty Heights and Wabash Aves. . . 


§52 




4 


1 


Edgecombe Academy, 2907 Edgecombe Circle 


42 




3 


1 




§40 




2 


1 


Knox Nursery, 4407 Clydesdale Ave 


§40 




6 




Woodland Nursery, 3911 Groveland Ave 


§35 




5 




Cloverdale, 2235 Linden Ave 


t34 




2 




Southwest Center Nursery, 1920 Wilkins Ave 


§32 




3 


1 


Cathedral Kindergarten, University Parkway and 








Charles St 


xx30 




3 






§30 




4 






§29 




2 


"i 


Twin Maples, 5718 Park Heights Ave 


t25 




3 


2 


Walbrook Memorial, Gwynns Falls Parkway and 












§25 




3 






§15 




1 




Clifton Day Nursery. 2628 Harford Ave 

Garden School, 1525 Bolton St 


§12 
9 




2 




2 


2 




Total (33) 


2,779 


829 


278 


76 


School for Colored Pupils 










Seventh Day Adventist, Harlem Ave. and Dolphin St.. . . 


63 


13 


3 


2 



* Secondary School accredited by Maryland State Board of Education, 
t Includes Kindergarten. 

X Includes Nursery School and Kindergarten. 
XX Nursery School and Kindergarten only. 
§ Nursery School only. 



210 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE V 

Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled in Maryland Non-Public Elementary and 
Secondary Schools, for the Year Ending June 30, 1944 



County 



White 



Number 

of 
Schools 



Enrollment 





Com- 




Elemen- 


mer- 


Second- 


tary 


cial 


ary 



Number 
of 

Teacher f 



Colored 



Number 

of 
Schools 



Enrollment 



Elemen- 


Second- 


tary 


ary 



Number 
of 

Teachers 



fCATHOLic Parish and Private Schools 



Allegany 


8 


1,808 


25 


485 


76 












1 


346 






8 


' ■ "i 


" 69 






Baltimore 


18 


3,977 


' 12 


i;i69 


152 










Calvert 


1 


63 


6 


20 


5 












1 


34 






5 










Carroll 


2 


183 




"27 


9 










Cecil 


1 


122 






3 












2 


327 




' '96 


14 


. . 


"i37 




' ' '3 




6 


535 


■ 42 


190 


49 


1 


5 




1 


Garrett 


1 


66 






4 












1 


105 






3 












4 


357 




' "74 


30 


' "i 


"53 




■ ■ '2 


Montgomery 


5 


1,150 


"79 


351 


60 












6 


1,043 


7 


. 86 


35 


. . 


' '66 






9 


1,373 


37 


209 


48 


2 


271 


■ '26 


12 


Washington 


1 


308 




75 


15 










Total Counties 


67 


11,797 


208 


2,716 


518 


7 


601 


26 


22 


Baltimore City 


65 


26,010 


478 


4,609 


894 


8 


1,334 


205 


81 


Total State 


132 


37,807 


686 


7,325 


1,412 


15 


1,935 


231 


103 



*Other Non-Public Private Schools 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Cecil 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Total Counties 
Baltimore City 

Total State 



24 
124 
718 
260 
8 

1,008 
123 
20 
19 

45 
73 
23 

2,445 
2,779 

5,224 



120 
655 
131 
1 

412 
7 
12 
181 

'74 



1,593 
829 



2.422 



1 

19 
160 
26 
2 

132 
15 

7 
18 

8 
16 

1 

405 
354 

759 



♦Schools and Institutions for Atypical Children 



Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 
Cockeysville 

Maryland School for the Deaf, 

Frederick 

Maryland School for the Blind, 

Dept. for Colored Deaf, Overlea . . . 

Open Air School, State Sanatorium. . 

Reinhardt School for Deaf Children, 
Inc., Kensington 

Maryland Training School for Boys, 
Loch Raven 

Montrose School for Girls, Reisters- 
town 

Cheltenham School for Colored Boys. 

Maryland Training School for Col- 
ored Girls, Glen Burnie 

Rosewood State Training School, 
Owings Mills 



55 




9 


8 








151 

58 

' 29 




15 
20 


18 
15 

" i 




" "25 

52 


■ ■ 2 
1 


18 






2 








195 




9 


9 








53 




45 


5 




'iei 
112 


3 


183 






10 









t Figures furnished by Rev. John I. Barrett, Superintendent of Catholic Schools. 
* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



NON Public Schools; Average Number Belonging in Public 211 

Schools 



a a 
OH 



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212 



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213 



Grand 
Total 


*t28,270,550 

*2, 476, 44 2 
t2, 086, 126 
*4, 712, 841 
339,071 
475,176 
] ,009,326 
732,978 
604,909 
713,472 
1,490,726 
713,131 
1,096,092 
558,636 
351,911 
2.539,209 
t3, 2 15, 896 
371.936 
316,360 
535.663 
457,140 
2,060,743 
*857 , 573 
535,193 

°17,647,917 

11,875,055 
3,341.435 
2,114.644 
316,783 

* 

t°45,918,467 




Total 
Colored 


^- 00 








S ;i iiiil :ie : : : - i 




1 


1 




1 

1 

o 


Junior, 
Senior, 
Junior- 
Senior 
High 
(8or9 to 
llorl2) 


i i ;| ; ;g ; i : ; : ; -i - ; : ;^ - i s 
s s -s ■ -2 ? » ■ ■ 1 IP 1 


Junior 
High 
(7or7-8) 


1 1 ;| : ;| : : ; : : : : :S : : ; : :2 : : S ;S ; : | 
:3- : : : g :g : : | 


u 


1 


Grades 
1-6 


S 2 . J J . . S 1 . . . 1 

1 ?3 n s ■ • a g ■ ■ ■ 2 








5 -msBrnm mBrnm'^ ^li ■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■ b 






II 






Total 
White 


\0 C*" ~ OS w ~ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ C~ J- -M ~ w W -Ji ^ C^J v"-* w 1-3 CO 








5 :i ;2ls§Ssiiggi :2isil :g| : :::: | 




I 


! 


ec CO 


Schools 


Junior, 
Senior, 
Junior- 
Senior 
High 
(8 or 9 to 
11 or 12) 


7=^ rn r^TZ — '. — '■ — '■ — ^ — TT^ — '. — . ^ -« — ! — '. — TZTZh — '. — '. >. , y> 

1 I ;s :Sg : : ; ; :g : ;S| : : :Ss : : 5 ilSI 1 

i i i '-si -ss ■■ •■ --si ■ ■■ 1 --Hi i 


White Day 


Junior 
High 
(7 or 7-8) 


i i ;l -ll ; : ■: i il ; ill - :ll : : i ;i : ; g 
i i '-i ' ■ -i"' ■ ■ -i" ■'■ i T'- i 




1 


Grades 
1-6 


*5, 108, 843 

*1, 264, 440 

*716,007 

160,213 
200,877 

1021854 

1,422,301 
63,226 

105; 642 
1,073.283 

7,947,261 
7,947,261 

*13.056,104 






Grades 
1-7(8) 


*1 1,692, 692 

206,988 
1,129,438 
2,441,064 
121 332 
72,416 
457 , 820 
505,9.57 
262,440 
345,792 
976,588 
539,125 
589,658 
343,185 
166,415 

1,991,342 
189,0.56 
139,267 
231,016 
9H,8.54 
221.016 
*432,370 
231,5.53 

♦11,692,692 


County 


Total Counties 

Anne Arundel 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City 

Elementary and 

Occupational 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

Total State 



214 1944 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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$7,737,804.58 < 

857,912.96 
473,169.42 
998,032.40 
67,632.38 

314,382.02 
219,678.63 
127,035.96 
166,767.92 
407,112.09 
242,882.46 
294,993.31 
158,808.48 

91,680.31 
993,813.10 
835,907.51 
101,078.24 

81,232.35 
106,242.05 
104,953.92 
664,454.22 
195,124.53 
125,540.91 

3,937,241.2 6 

$11,675,045.84 ? 




$998,912.75 

82,218.38 
73,460.23 
110,125.11 

25,177.82 
°64, 117.02 
28,890.08 
28,357.43 
29,243.55 
71,189.15 
53,330.24 
33,991.69 
33,556.90 
14,888.17 
68,988.01 
60,738.37 
20,959.95 
22,947.22 
23,191.75 
20,177.44 
51,543.60 
33,579.04 
28,832.94 

d49,720.30 

$1,048,633.05 


i X t> t- — — — — -r" CO c 1-0 c; t> c; 1-0 --r eg Lo t> uo 
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$687,455.18 

87,513.73 
37,725.57 
95,980.14 
5,899.07 
7,533.01 
19,983.77 
17,276.12 
18,133.-56 
17,256.77 
32,837.95 
12,-500.01 
23,465.22 
12,341.01 
10,789.83 
100,089.46 
85,119.63 
8,462.66 
3,777.04 
7,517.80 
9,447.72 
4-5,154.79 
17,631.73 
11,018.59 

506,167.97 

$1,193,623.15 


uoiiDnj;sTii 
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$6,750,854.87 

634,330.18 
345,690.45 
768,773.84 
39.964.10 
74,0.53.57 
224,218.62 
168,492.67 
76,507.86 
114,284.98 
295,034.05 
172,121.78 
22a,(H;().Sl 
109,596. 10 
62,176.76 
762,050.04 
635,088.34 
68,548.93 
52,915.44 
73,380.04 
73,751.00 
6.52,481.21 
136,.534.87 
81,799.23 

3,279,167.22 

$9,030,022.09 


^uoi^onj^suj JO 


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$57,853.30 

13,328.47 
3,844.14 
4,986.77 
237.84 
1,270.92 
1,403.55 
1,967.19 
639.37 
509.90 
1,931.22 
714.18 
1,160.65 
1,056. .52 
320.16 
9,576.69 
4,696.43 
825.28 
667.37 
296.36 
877.20 
5,498.06 
1,695.72 
349.31 

38,902.44 

$96,765.74 


ST^ooq^jxaj, 


$119,430.30 

12,420.13 
11,967.52 
1 1 ,097.26 
'87 5! 63 
1,187.35 
3,733.75 
5,105.42 
2,366.25 
2,630.34 
3,993.72 
3,783.91 
2,990.08 
3,134.44 
993.56 
12,729.04 
17,134.00 
1,717.36 
660.25 
2,409.72 
912.29 
13,267.87 
2,536.89 
1,784.. 53 

32,368.89 

$151,799.19 


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$5,378,872.00 

584.144.89 
319.104.90 
737.372,32 
3.5,718.14 
68,235.30 
211,-537.95 
164,9.58.82 
70,640.41 
107,455.05 
281,942. .50 
1.59,964.94! 
217,.561.18 
101,617-99 
57,693.97 
711,063.05 
593.834.60 
62.681.09 
48.021.70 
66,476..S9 
68,688.73 
515,270.39 
128,767.61 
76.119.58 

3,077,625.00 

$8,456,497.00 


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$151,225,021 

17,217.29! 
7,927.271 

2,993.49 
3,280.0q 
6,316.50 
6,171.24^ 
2,627.60 
3,2.52.69 
6,232. llJ 
6,111.3a 
6,609.5ffl 
3,173.9^ 
2,643.4® 
14,062.79 
14,8.54.931 
3.048.80 
3,186.63 
3,216.39' 
2,840.00| 
16,977.17! 
2,821.89j 
3,296.61 

79,476.38| 

-$230,701.35 


guipua^jv 
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108,784 

10,672 
6,974 

18,778 
742 
1,-531 
4,222 
3,196 
1,637 
2,053 
5,904 
3,210 
4.311 
2,114 
1,010 

11,191 

12,487 
1,145 
874 
1,400 
1,329 
9,851 
2,644 
1,459 

49,032 

157,766 



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Disbursements 



FOR White Elementary and Secondary Schools 225 



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226 1944 Report of Maryland State 



Department of Education 





$57,370.69 

2.04 
9,989.47 


14,928.03 

1.00 
8.71 


9.71 

142.06 

one 00 

604.45 


1,062.51 


116.57 


116.67 
73.74 


73.74 


24.00 
1,747.63 


1,771.63 

"imp 


16.00 


s3Jiv)ipuadx3 


$2,337,635.91 

193,633.04 
389,768.39 


698,054.07 

3,908.60 
12,402.64 


16,311.24 

42,323.21 
51,082.57 


263,440.63 

4,046.33 
21,727.51 


25,773.84 

8,954.91 
56,997.22 


66,962.13 

14,708.79 
8,481,43 

OU,uOO.D^ 


103,745.84 

1,816.15 
9,481.35 


11,297.50 




$161,733.94 

17,385.16 
718.50 
27,985.26 


46,088.92 

316.17 
326.17 


642.34 

5,390.87 
2,170.65 
13,685.75 


21,247.27 

280.58 
1,218.53 


1,499.11 

2,102.54 
7,661.04 




9,763.58 

2,396.85 
1,605.89 
9,453.74 


13,456.48 

140.00 
2,005.22 


2,146.22 




$86,613.63 

y,oyu.4o 
934.56 
18,740.18 


29,265.19 

461.12 
1,126.08 


1,687.20 

698.94 
817.61 
2,277.77 


3,794.32 

71.79 
317.79 


389.68 

131.76 
983.99 


1,115.75 

162.08 
2,976.28 


3,247.58 

28.80 
150.42 


179.22 


uoi:}Bjado 


$195,564.10 

1,339.25 
36,032.93 


58,589.57 

412.75 
989.69 


1,402.44 
3,159.08 

O AQQ 

11,256.70 


17,904.45 

449.14 
2,207.07 


2,666.21 

519.39 
3,963.43 


4,482.82 
850.06 

«9Q OA 

5,726.51 


7,206.40 

78.35 
496.56 


574.90 


JO 56O0 IB^OJ, 


$1,893,724.24 

145,440.04 
11,660.33 
307,010.02 


464,110.39 

2,718.56 
9,960.70 


12,679.26 

33,074.32 
44,606.64 
142,814.63 


220,494.59 

3,244.82 
17,984.12 


21,228.94 

6,201.22 
44,388.76 


50,589.98 

11,299.81 
6,136.48 
62,399.09 


79,836.38 

1,569.00 
6,829.16 


8,398.16 


uoponj^jstij 
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$42,582.19 

3,140.28 
'l75.16 
t6,613.29 


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110.30 
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3,649.72 
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8,831.67 


12,669.06| 

44.59 
365.03 


409.62 

379.33 
1.072.09 
li072.'81 


2,524.23 

97.72 
439.02 


536.74 

94.17 
619.90 


714.07 

62.41 
62.66 
715.65 


840.72 

4.00 
99.56 


103.56 


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3 249 18 
'348.62 
8,534.88 


12,132.68 

10.24 
228.0r 


238.25 

282.5^ 
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2,402!39i 


3,630.1l! 

51.40 
487.93 


539.33 

116.38 
691.45 


807.83 

129.24 
166 67 
740!51 


1,036.42 

10.00 
76.95 


85.96 


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10,948.88 
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t429,379.92 

2,663.73 
9,355.69 


12,019.42 

t32,166.31 
t41,750.83 
tl36,048.93 


t209,965.07 

3,075.88 
16,966.69 


20,042.57 

5,990.67 
43,028.21 


49,018.88 

tll,074.38 
t6,868.52 
t59,513.11 


t76,446.01 

1,554.00 
6,603.50 


8.157,50 


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$108.57 

87.98 
162.80 
120.90 


108.44 

105.64 
213.84 


171.70 

68.60 
76.79 
96.90 


82.22 

48.17 
75.18 


69.10 

73.22 
122.60 


112.32 

86.52 
192.76 
121.32 


118.16 

161.34 
103.06 


108.63 


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$2,060 

1,727 
2,281 
2.064 


1.946 

1,480 
2,176 


1,970 

2,000 
2,162 
2,235 


2,181 

1,465 
1,731 


1,684 

1,619 
1,863 


1.829 

1,862 
1,973 
1.943 


1,933 

1,726 
1,738 


1,736 


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851.6 

78.4 
4.8 
133.2 


216.4 

1.8 
4.3 


6.1 

15.8 
19.0 
59.9 


94.7 

2.1 
9.8 


11.9 

3.7 
23.1 


26.8 

5.8 
2.9 
29.9 


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2,024 
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3.023 


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2,955 

74 
266 


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2,201 
90 
3,224 


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95 

617 
674 
1,913 


3,204 

84 
289 


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County 


Total Counties . . 

Allegany 
White: 

Grades 7-8. . 
Grade 9, Yr. I 
9-12, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Colored: 

Grades 7-8 ... . 
9-12, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Baltimore 
White: 

Grade 7 

8, 8-9, I,I-II. , . 
8-11, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Colored: 

Grade 7 


8-11, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Caroline 

Grade 7 

8-11, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Carroll 
White: 

Grade 7 

a O T TT 


8-11, I-IV. . . . 

Total 

Colored: 

Grade 7 

8-11, I-IV. . . . 

Total 



Disbursements for Junior and Junior-Senior High Schools 227 







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Entrants 
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INDEX 



A 

Absence. 145-146, 160-161, 174, 175, 178, 180 
Academic course, each high school, 230-235 
Acceleration and adjustment of school pro- 
gram, 163-165 
Adapting school program to wartime condi- 
tions, 162-165 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 104, 105 
Expenditures, 220 
Percent for, 102-103 
High school principal, 162-165, 167-168 
Superintendents, 143-155 
Admission 

Age for entrance of first grade pupils, 9 
Policies at State Teachers Colleges, l&l, 182 
Adult education, 92, 93, 95-97, 122, 144, 154 
Ages of boys and girls, age-grade study, 29-30 
Agriculture 

Adjustment to wartime conditions, 97, 161 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school^ 236-241 

White, 44 
Evening schools, 92, 97 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 56 
Federal aid, 119, 120-123 
Graduates working in, 40-41, 43 
Schools offering, 44, 45, 57 
Teachers, 57 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds to 
Counties and Baltimore 

Distributed by type of fund, 1943-44, 200, 
217 

1924-1944, 98-99, 150 
1943-1944, 100-101. 200, 217 
State teachers colleges, 189-191, 200-201 
Vocational education, 119-123, 200, 202 

Training for war production, 95-97 
Vocational rehabilitation, 94-95, 200, 202 
Appropriations 

County, 1944-45, 133, 135 
County and State 
1924-1944, 98-99 
1943-1944, 100-101, 217, 218 
State, 1943-1944, 100-101, 200-202, 217 
Architect, consultant, 200 
Armed services, entrants into 
Pupils, 163, 164, 165 
Teachers, 64-65, 145 
Art, white high schools 

Enrollment, 44, 52, 236-241 
Teachers of, 57 
Assessable basis, 136-137, 140, 149 
Attendance, 174-175, 177, 178, 179 
Aggregate days of, 214 
Average daily, 212 

Credit for work exper^ence, 145-146, 161, 162 
Effect of war on, 174-175, 177, 178-179 
Index of elementary, 16 



A -(Continued) 

Attendance (Cont.) 

Law, change recommended, 175 
Percent of, 14-15, 213 
Summer school pupils, 91, 185 
Teachers at summer school, 70 
Workers, 173-181, 215, 220 
Audiometer tests, 32-33 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per white pupil for, 108, 109 
Expenditures for 
Colored, 288, 229 
Total by purpose, 222 
White elementary, 224 
White high, 225 
Percent of current expense budget, 102-103 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 53 
Belonging, average number, 211 

Each high school, 230-235 

Per teacher, 71-76 

Proportion in high school, 13 
BiTth rates. 12 
Blind, rehabilitation of, 94 
Board of Education, State, 2, 200, 202 
Bonds for schools, 130, 150 
Bonus for teachers, 79, 146-152, 182, 188 
Bookkeeping, 51 

Books and instructional materials 
Cost per white pupil 

Elementary, 108 

High, 109 
Expenditures 

All schools, 221 

Colored, 228, 229 

White elementary, 224 

White high, 225 
Percent of current expense budget, 102-103 
State aid for, 1943-1944, 217 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

By age and grade, 18, 29, 30 

Total, 204-205 
Graduates 

Elementary school, 21, 22, 23 

High school, 35-36, 37-43, 230-235 
Non-promotions 

Elementary, 21, 24-28 

First grade, 26 

High school subjects, white pupils 
Each subject, 56 
One or more subjects, 54-55 
Budget (s) 

Local, county and Baltimore City, 148 
1924-1944, 100-101 

1943- 1944, 102-103 

1944- 1945, 133 

State public school, 200-202 
State teachers colleges, 200-201 



242 



Index 



243 



B- (Continued) 

Buildings, grounds and equipment 
Cost, (see capital outlay) 
Number of. 203 

Value of school, per pupil, 131-132 
Buses and tires, 155 
Business education 

Enrollment 

Each high school. 236-241 
Total and by county, 44, 51 

Failures and withdrawals. 56 

Schools having, 44, 67 

Teachers. 57 
By-laws, changes in, 145-146, 181, 182 

c 

Capital outlay, school 

By sites, buildings, equipment, 223 

By types of schools, 129 

By year, 1924-1944, 99, 149 

Colored, 228-229 

White elementary, 108, 224 

White high, 109, 225 
Census and attendance fund, 200, 217 
Certificates held by county teachers, 58, 60-G2, 
171 

Changes in requirements for, 144-145 
Child care program, 158-160 
Child labor laws, 161, 174. 175, 177, 178 
Child study, 178-179, 180 

Classes 

Evening school, 92, 93, 95-97, 122 
Size of, 71-76, 88-89, 90, 146 
Special for handicapped, 32, 33, 34 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 91 

Classroom unit, expenditure per, 115-117 

Clerks, county schools, 58, 215 

Clinics, 193, 195 

Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1943 entering, 39-43 

of 1944 entering teachers colleges, 37-39, 
149, 230-235 
State teachers, 181-191, 200, 201. 230-235 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland 

counties, 1943-44, 59, 184 
White high school graduates of 1943 entering 
Maryland, 42 
Commercial subjects, (See business education) 
Committee assignments of superintendents, 143- 
145 

Conference programs 

Attendance officers, 173-181 
Child care, 160 

High school principals, 168-169 
Post-war organization, 156-157 
Superintendents, 143-155 
Supervisors 

Colored. 170-172 



C- (Continued) 

Conference programs (Cent.) 
Supervision (Cont. ) 

White elementary, 157-158 
White high, 160, 163, 168-169 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 86 
Schools closed by, 203 
Transportation of pupils, 124-128, 222 
Coordinating welfare agencies. 175-176, 177, 178 
Cost per school pupil 

Analyzed for white elementary and high, 108. 
109 

By types of schools. 105 

Colored elementary and high schools. 112-113 
General control, 104, 105 
Individual high schools, 230-235 
One-teacher schools, white, 105. 107 
State teachers colleges, 189-191 
Transported. 126 

White elementary and high schools, 106-111 
Costs (see expenditures) 
Courses in individual high schools, 236-241 
Crippled children, services for, 195 
Cumulative record card, 155, 170, 180 
Current expenses ^ 
Cost per pupil 
Colored, 112, 113 
Individual high schools, 230-235 
White elementary and high schools, 106-108 
Expenditures 
Colored, 228-229 
Total, 219 
White, 224-225 
Curriculum, redirection of, 162-163, 167. 172. 
174, 175, 177, 181-182 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, days in 

session. 8, 213 
Debt service 

1943- 1944. 130. 131, 223 

1944- 1945, 133-135 
Tax rate for, 138-139 

Dental clinics. 193 
Diplomas for transfers. 167 
Disbursements (see expenditures) 
Distributive education. 51. 119. 120. 122. 123 

E 

Elementary school defined. 146 

Employment 

High school graduates. 40, 41, 43 

School age youth, 160-161. 174, 176, 177, 178 

English, high school, 162 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 
White, 44, 46 
Failures and withdrawals, white. 66 



244 



Index 



E- (Continued) 

English (Cont.) 

Schools offering, 57, 236-241 
Teachers. 57 
Enrollment 

Adult, 92, 93, 95-97 
Elementary, 7, 9, 11, 204-205 
Grade or year, 18, 19-20 
High school, 7, 10 11 

Course, each school, 230-235 
Growth in, 10, 11, 111, 114 
Subjects 
Colored, 45 
Each school, 236-241 
White, 44, 46-53 
Year, 10, 11, 111, 114 
Each school, 230-235 
White, 46 

Non-public, private and parochial schools, 7, 

11, 206-210 
Public schools, 7, 9, 10, 11, 204, 205 
State teachers colleges, 185-186 
Subject 

Colored high, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White high, 44, 40-53 
Summary, elementary and secondary, public 

and non-public, city and county, 7, 11 
Summer schools, pupils, 91 
Total public schools, 7, 11, 204-205 
Equalization fund, 100-101, 217 
Equipment, wartime problems in purchasing, 
154, 155 

Equivalence examinations, 16^-166 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 92, 93, 95-97 

Expenditures, 96, 119, 122, 123, 222 
Expenditures, 219-229 

(See also general control, instruction, opera- 
tion, maintenance, auxiliary agencies, 
fixed charges, tuition to adjoining counties, 
current expenses, debt service, capital 
outlay ) 

Colored schools, 228-229 

Elementary schools, 224, 228 

Evening schools, 96, 119, 122, 123, 222 

Health, 193-195, 222 

High schools, 225, 226-227, 229 

Junior and junior-senior high schools, 226-227 

Libraries, 222 

Per classroom unit, 115-117 

Salaries 

All schools, 221 
Colored high, 114, 229 
Elementary, 224, 228 
White high. 111, 225 

State teachers colleges, 189-191, 200, 201 

Summer schools, 222 

Total, by major classifications, 219 

Transportation, 124, 125, 222 



E - (Continued) 

Expenditures (Cont.) 

Vocational work. Federal. 119, 120-123, 200, 
202 

Extension courses, credit, 145 
Extra-curricular activities, 142 

F 

Failures (see non-promotions) 
Farm machinery, repair of, 97 
Federal aid, 150 

Federal Works Agency, 129, 149 
Vocational education, 200, 202 

Administration and supervision, 123 
Salaries of teachers 
Baltimore City, 123 
County day, 120-123 
County evening, 122 
War production, 95-97 
Financing schools 

County schools, 146, 217-229 
State public schools 200, 201, 202 
State teachers colleges, 190, 191 
First grade 

Enrollment, 18, 19, 20, 29, 30 
Non-promotions, 26 
Fixed charges, 222 
French 

Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White, 44, 50 
Failures and withdrawals, white. 56 
Schools offering, 57, 236-241 
Teachers, 57 

G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 104, 105 

Expenditures, 220 

Percent for, 102-103 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 53 
Grade enrollment, non-promotions, 18, 19, 20, 

26 

Graduates 

Elementary school, 21-23, 35-37 
High school. 180 

Entering teachers colleges, 37-39, 40, 42, 43. 
149 

From each school, 230-235 
Inductees. 163-166 
Occupations of 39-43, 146 
Teachers colleges, 171, 183, 184 
Growth in high school enrollment, teachers, and 

salaries, 111, 114 
Guidance, 57, 156, 163-165, 168, 169-170, 174, 
178-181 



Index 



245 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 32 

Home instruction, 32, 33, 34 

Hospital schools, 32 

Institutions for, 210 

Opportunities for education of 32-34 

Receipts from State, 32, 200, 217 

Services for crippled, 195 

Transportation, 32 
Hard-of-hearing children, 32, 33. 34 
Health 

Activities of State Department, 176. 193-195 
Cooperation with health officials, 108, 109, 

176, 177, 194 
Cost per pupil, 194 
Expenditures 

All schools, 222 

By county health offices, 194 
Programs for children, 176, 177. 193-195 
High school equivalence examinations, 164-166, 
200 

High schools 

Aid for, 146, 217 

Disbursements, 225, 220-227, 229 

Individual, 230-241 

Reports, 167-168 
Home Economics 

Adjustment to war conditions, 144, 153 

Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White, 44, 50 
Evening schools, 92, 93, 119, 122 
Federal aid, 119, 120, 121, 123 
Schools having, 44, 57, 236-241 
Teachers, 57 
Home instruction of pupils, 32, 33 

I 

Immunizations, 195 

Income taxes. Federal and State, 141, 149. 150 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 134, 135 
Index of school attendance, 16 
Industrial arts (see also trades and industries) 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White, 44, 50 
Schools having, 57, 23G-241 
Teachers, 57 
Instruction 

Cost per white pupil, 104-109 
Expenditures 

Colored, 228-229 

Junior and junior-senior high, 226-227 
Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 221 
State teachers colleges, 189-191 
White elementary and high, 224-225 
Percent of current expense budget, 102-103 
Insurance, 144, 222 



J 

Junior and junior-senior high schools, 226-227 
Juvenile delinquency, 177 

K 

Kindergartens, enrollment, 19, 20 

L 

Languages (see English, French. Latin, 

Spanish) 
Late entrants, 16, 171 
Latin (see French) 
Legislation, 145, 147, 148. 152 
Length of session, 8, 213 
Levies, county, 133, 134, 135, 147-148 
Libraries 

Colored schools, 172, 198 

Expenditures all schools. 222 

High school, 167-168 

Service from Library Advisory Commission. 
196-198 

Library Advisory Commission, service from, 196 
-198 

Lip reading classes, 33 

Lunches, school. Federal aid for, 144, 153 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per white pupil for. 108. 109 
Expenditures 

By type of repair, 222 

Colored, 228, 229 

White elementary, 224 

White high, 225 
Percent of current expense budget. 102. 103 
Materials of instruction and books 
Cost per white pupil for, 108. 109 
Expenditures 

Colored, 228, 229 

Total, 221 

White elementary, 224 

White high, 225 
Percent of current expense budget, 102, 103 
State aid for, 217 
Mathematics, high school, 162, 163, 172 
Enrollment 

Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 
White, 44, 47 

Failures and withdrawals, white, 56 

Schools having, 44, 57, 236-241 

Teachers, 57 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 195 

Teachers, 152 
Men teachers, 59, 215, 216 
Mentally handicapped children, 33. 34 



246 



Index 



M- (Continued) 

Military service 

Credit for teachers, 145 

Induction of high school students, 163, 1G4, 
165.-166 
Music, high school 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White, 44, 52, 53 

Orchestras, bands, etc., 53 
Schools having, 44, 57, 236-241 
Teachers, 57 

N 

N. Y. A., equipment, 154 

Night schools (see evening schools) 

Non-promotions, 21 

Colored elementary schools, 21, 25, 26, 28 
First grade, 26 
Subject, white high schools 
Each subject, 56 
One or more subjects, 54-55 
White elementary schools, 21, 24, 26, 27 
Number belonging, 211 
Each high school, 230-235 
Per teacher, 71 
Colored, 74, 75 
White elementary, 72 
White high, 73 
Proportion in high school, 13 
Number of schools 

Having one teacher, 86 
Non-public. 206-210 
Public, 203 

Elementary, 85 
High, 87-90 
Nurses, number, 194, 215 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 37-39, 

40-43, 174, 175 
One-teacher school organizations 
Decrease in, 86 
Number of, 85, 86 
White 

Capital outlay for, 129 
Cost per pupil, 105, 107 
Decrease in, 86 
Number belonging in, 86 

Per teacher, 71 
Percent of attendance, 15 
Salary per teacher in, 78 
Operation 

Cost per white pupil, 108, 109 
Expenditures 

By fuel, janitors' wages, supplies, 221 
Colored, 228, 229 
White elementary, 224 
White high, 225 
Percent of current expense budget, 102, 103 
Orchesftras, bands, etc., 63 



P 

Parent-teacher associations, 142 
Parochial and private schools, 7, 11, 2U6-210 
Part-payment of salaries, 200, 217 
Persistence to high school graduation, 35-37 
Physical education and recreation 

Appropriation for, 200, 202 

High school enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 

White, 44. 52 
Schools offering. 44, 57, 236-241 
Teachers, 57 
Physical examinations (see medical examina- 
tions) 

Physically handicapped children, 32. 33, 34 
Services for crippled children, 195 

Postwar construction program, teachers col- 
leges, 188 

Pre-induction courses, 49, 162, 164, 172 
Pre-Kindergarten classes, 19 
Presidents of teachers colleges, 2, 187 
Principals, high school, salaries, 71, 73 
Private and parochial schools, 7, 11, 206-210 
Programs of conferences (see conferences) 
Property, valuation of 

County and City, 136-137 

School, 131-132 
Public relations program, 168-169, 171, 178, 179 
Public welfare agencies, relations with, 175, 

176, 177, 178 
Pupils 

Non-public schools, 7, 11, 206-210 
One-teacher schools, 86 
Per teacher, 71-76, 
Public school 

Enrollment, 7, 9, 10, 11, 204-205 

Number attending, 212 

Number belonging, 211 

Percent of attendance, 213 
Transported, 123, 124, 125, 127 
Pupil-teacher planning, 155 

R 

Radio broadcast service, 152-153 

Ratio of high school to total attending and 

belonging, 13 
Rationing aided by teachers, 149. 153 
Receipts from 
All sources, 218 
Federal Government, 217 

Evning schools, counties, 122 
Federal Works Agency, 129 
Teachers' salaries, counties, 119-123 
Vocational education, 119-123 
Baltimore City, 123 
War production, 92-97 
Rosen wald fund, 198 



Index 



247 



R- (Continued) 

Receipts from State 

Distributed by type of fund, 1943-1944, 200, 
217 

1924-1944, 98, 99 

Teachers colleges, 189-191. 200-201 
Total and percent, 100, 101 
Record card for elementary pupils, 157, 180 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 94-95 
Repair of farm machinery, 97 
Report of high school principals, 167-168, 172 
Resignations of teachers, 63-65 
Retarded children, classes for, 33, 34 
Retirement System, Teachers 

Financial statement, 200 

Members, 149, 192 

Status of members in armed services, 145 
Rosenwald fund, 198 

s 

Salaries 

Adjustment of, because of abnormal loss of 

teachers, 78-83, 146-152, 188 
Attendance officers, 220 
Growth in high school. 111, 114 
Percent of school budget, 102, 103 

Relation to public income, 148-149 
Superintendents, 143, 220 
Supervisors, 221 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 77-83 

Cost per white pupil, 108, 109 
Teachers colleges, 182, 188, 190 
Total 

Colored elementary, 228 
Colored high, 114, 229 
Teachers colleges, 190 
White elementary, 224 
White high. 111, 225 
Scholastic credit for work experience, 145-146, 
162 

School laws, new edition, 152 
Schools, number of, 7 
Science, high school, 162 
Enrollment 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 
White, 44, 49 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools. 
56 

High schools offering, 44, 57, 236-241 
Teachers, 57 
Session, length of, 8, 213 
Sex of teachers, 59, 215, 216 
Sick leave, 144 
Size of 

Classes, 71-76 
Schools 

Each high. 230-235 
Elementary, 85, 86 
High, 87-89 



S- (Continued) 

Size of (Cont.) 

Teaching staff, 85-89, 143, 215-216 
Social studies, 163 

Enrollment in high school 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 
White. 44, 48 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools, 
56 

High schools offering, 44, 57 
Teachers, 57 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 32, 33, 34 
Special high school teachers, 57, 230-235 
State 

Aid to health, 194 
Aid to schools, 146 

Showing various school funds, 200, 217 
1924-1944, 98, 99, 147, 153 
Board of education, 2, 200 
Department of Education, 2, 200, 201, 202 
Department of Health 
Expenditures, 194 
School activities, 193-195 
Teachers colleges, 2, 37-39, 42, 181-191 
Teachers Retirement System, 2, 192. 200 
Statistical tables, 203-229 
Stenography, typewriting, bookkeeping, 51 
Subjects studied in high school 
Colored, 45 

Each high school, 236-241 
White, 44, 46-53 
Summer school attendance 
Pupils, 91. 163-164 
County teachers, 70, 145 
Superintendents. 2, 143-144, 215. 220 
Supervision. Supervisors 
Activities 

Colored, 170-172 

White elementary, 157, 158 

White high, 160-173 
Cost per white elementary pupil for, 108 
Cost, salaries and expenses 

All schools. 220 

Colored, 228, 229 

White, 224, 225 
Curriculum revision. 162-163, 1^"^ 
Names of, 3 
Number of, 155, 215 

Percent of current expense budget, 102-103 

T 

Taxable basis, 186, 137 

Tax dollar, distribution of school. 102-103 

Tax rates, county. 138-139. 147-148 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 57, 230-235 
Cadets from Teachers Colleges, 182, 184, 185. 
186 



248 



Index 



T- (Continued) 

Teachers (Cont.) 

Certification of, 58, 60-62, 144-145 

Colleges, 2, 37-39, 40, 42, 149, 151, 172, 181- 

191, 193, 200, 201 
Entering armed services, status of, 64, 65, 
145 

Number of, 7, 215-216 

For each high school subject, 57 

In each high school, 230-235 

In schools of each type 

Colored, 7, 88, 90, 216, 228, 229 
Non-public schools, 7, 204-210 
Public schools, 7, 215-216 
White elementary, 7, 85, 86, 215, 224 
White high, 7, 88, 167, 215, 225 
White junior and junior-senior high, 7, 
215, 226-227 

Per county, 143 

Total public schools, 7, 215-216 
Pupils per, 71-76, 146 
Resignations of, 63-65 
Retirement, 64-65 

Salaries of, 77-83, 111, 114, 148-149, 150, 151- 

152, 188, 221, 224-229 
Sex of, 59, 215-216 

Special high school, 57, 144-145, 230-235 
Summer school attendance of, 70, 145, 172 
Turnover of, 63-69, 144, 146, 149 
Welfare, 144 
. Teachers* Retirement System, 149 
Financial statement, 200 
Staff, 3 

Status of members who enter armed services, 
145 

Teachers' contributions to, 192 
Trades and industry, courses in 
Enrollment, day schools 
Colored, 45, 121 
Each high school, 236-241 
White, 44, 50 
Evening schools, 92, 122 
Federal aid. 119-123 
Schools having, 44, 236-241 
Training for war production, 95-97 
Training centers, teachers colleges, 187 
Training for war production workers, 95-97 



T - (Continued) 

Training schools for juvenile delinquents, 173 

Transportation of pupils, 124-128 

Cost, total and per pupil, 124, 125, 128 
Percent of pupils transported, 127 
Problems due to war conditions, 155 

Tutition charge, teachers colleges, 189, 190, 191 

Turnover in teaching staff, 63-69, 146, 149, 171, 
178, 180 

Typewriting, 51, 163 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 136-137 

School property, 131-132 
Veterans, conference on meeting educational 

needs, 156-157 
Victory Corps, 162, 172 
Vocational education 

Enrollment, day schools, 44, 45, 50, 120, 121, 
123, 236-241 

Evening schools, 92, 122, 123 

Federal aid, 119-123, 200, 202, 217 

State aid, 200, 202 

Training for war production workers, 95-97. 
154 

Vocational guidance, 57, 156, 163-105, 168, 169- 

170, 174, 178-181 
Vocational rehabilitation, 94-95, 200, 202 

w 

War effort, adjustment of schools to, 149, 153- 
154 

War emergency certificates, 58, 60-62, 144-145 
War saving stamps, 149, 153-154 
Welfare department, cooperation with, 175-176, 
178 

Withdrawals of pupils 
Elementary, 16, 171 
High, 167, 168 

Teachers colleges, freshmen, 187 
Work experience, high school credit for 145-146, 
162 

Y 

Year, length of school, 8, 273 




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